Developer Support Myth #2: The phone doesn’t ring off the hook


At least not in the location I was sitting. In fact the call routing happens off-site, but most calls require one or more call-backs with developer support. I discovered rare for a developer issue to be resolved in the true “1st contact”. Like I said before, these are difficult issues and most developers willing to commit to a potential $250 phone call have already tried to use all the low hanging fruit to get answers.


I observed a lot of research, problem solving, and debugging (both customer code via live-meeting and Microsoft code to find root causes). Engineers would spend a lot of time doing research on a problem then call back customers with potential workarounds.


If you like solving a problem, and then another completely different one, and so on to the point where you get really broad exposure to technology, developer support is a cool place to be.

Comments (2)

  1. Joku says:

    Speaking of completely different problems, if you are running Vista there, could you take a few seconds and try this: Open cmd prompt, type:

    md !testing

    then attempt to cd into it by doing:

    cd !<TAB>

    where <TAB> is pressing the auto-completion key.

    One might expect this to procude:

    cd !testing

    But it comes of as cd !"!testing"

    The system cannot find the path specified.

    I won’t bother reporting this bug since I don’t have Vista installed. It could be fixed for all I know.

    Another possible bug seems to be that if NTFS 8.3 support is disabled in source machine, then under some unknown conditions moving of a folder to a machine where that is not disabled seems to cause "destination does not support long filenames". Upon rebooting machines it went away though.

  2. Norman Diamond says:

    Sunday, March 19, 2006 8:17 AM by Joku

    > then under some unknown conditions moving of a folder

    > to a machine where that is not disabled seems to

    > cause "destination does not support long filenames".

    > Upon rebooting machines it went away though.

    There are lots of cases where Windows will tell you that a destination doesn’t support long filenames.  Sometimes it happens on local disks when you’re looking at a long filename in Windows Explorer and just want to do a Ctrl-X Ctrl-V from one directory to another in the same partition.  You’re supposed to pay US$250 for each variation you find on this bug.  Even the assertion of getting refunds for known bugs doesn’t count, because a fix for one variation doesn’t fit all variations.  After one fix you still have problems, so there isn’t even any assertion that you can get a refund.