.NET from A to Z – The Index

As you might be aware, this week ended my A-Z series exploring various facets of Microsoft and .NET technologies.  It was actually a lot of fun to explore a different topic each week, and I’m even happier to say I didn’t miss one Monday, making me something like 1 for10 in terms of fulfilling New…

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Z is for… Zermatt

Zermatt is, well actually was, the code name for Microsoft’s next generation identity and access management API.   Zermatt is now known by its new code name of “Geneva” Framework, but short of z-index, I was coming up empty on something to cover for this final post of my A-Z series – so let’s just call…

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Y is for… Yield

Before we talk specifically about the yield keyword, let’s review a few constructs you probably use everyday, namely collection classes like lists and arrays.  We’re quite used to traversing these simply with a foreach loop, and what enables us to do so is that these types implement the System.Collections.IEnumerable interface. IEnumerable is a rather simple…

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X is for… XML Literal

XML Literal(s) is a feature that Visual Basic developers can call their own! The XML Literal syntax facilitates creating XML documents and elements that support the vast majority of the XML 1.0 specification. Complementing the literals are axis properties that aid in navigating and accessing XML elements and attributes. Let’s start with an example.  Below…

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W is for… WeakReference

With most of the major development technologies from Microsoft beginning with a “W” – Windows Presentation Foundation, Windows Communication Foundation, Windows Workflow Foundation – there was no shortage of choices for today’s post.  But somehow those just seemed too easy, and well, a bit large to tackle in one post. So, from the depths of…

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V is for… Velocity

Velocity is the code name (and a cool code name at that) for a highly-scalable, in-memory cache currently in a Community Technology Preview (CTP) stage.  The objective of Velocity is to increase performance by enabling your applications to grab data from the cache versus needing to make expensive calls back to the data source, whether…

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U is for… unchecked

Welcome to the Memorial Day edition of the A-Z series!  As I flipped through the index of Pro C# 2008 and the .NET 3.5 Platform, I happened upon the unchecked keyword – one of those things I remember seeing once or twice, but couldn’t really recall what it did or how it worked.  As  you…

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T is for… Tracepoint

I’ve presented various sessions on Debugging Tips and Tricks as part of the Northeast Roadshow and MSDN Events series, and one of the undiscovered gems in that presentation is that of tracepoints.  Tracepoints have actually been around since Visual Studio 2005, but weren’t all that discoverable until Visual Studio 2008. What exactly is a tracepoint? …

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S is for… sqlmetal

sqlmetal is one of the rare cases where a Microsoft utility or application ends up seeing the light of day with a cool name!  If you’re working with LINQ to SQL you may know what sqlmetal is, but since much of what it does is part of the Visual Studio designer experience there’s a fair…

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R is for… REST

REST stands for Representational State Transfer, an acronym coined by Dr. Roy Fielding in 2000 as part of his doctoral dissertation at the University of California, Irvine.  As Dr. Fielding states in Chapter 6, Since 1994, the REST architectural style has been used to guide the design and development of the architecture for the modern…

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