Support timelines for SQL Server, .NET Framework, Visual Studio, Team Foundation Server and Windows

Microsoft maintains a database of all supported products, along with the dates when those products’ various support stages end.  Anyone can search the database for a specific product, but that can be time-consuming when data for more than one product is needed.  I have therefore been maintaining a list of important dates and relevant information about several products…


Additional reasons to migrate off of Visual Basic 6

As most people know by now, support for Visual Basic 6 expired in 2008 (http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?sort=PN&alpha=visual+basic+6&Filter=FilterNO).  However, I frequently receive questions about the risks of NOT migrating.  I try to respond to each of these requests individually, but I thought that I would post a typical response here.  Perhaps some of you will find this useful. So, for…


VB 6 Support is Winding Down

Ah…. VB 6.  It’s been one of my favorite languages.  Over the years, I’ve created all kinds of programs with it; games, business applications, hardware control systems, etc.  Although I was among the first to admit its faults, I was also one of the first to proclaim its strengths and to defend its value.  Even…

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Subscribe to the Lifecycle Newsletter

In my last post, I discussed the Microsoft product lifecycle site, and how you should use it to ensure that your products remain supported.  If you have a lot of products, this can be pretty time-cosuming.  There is a better way.  Simply subscribe the the quarterly newsletter.  Each quarter, you’ll receive an email update of…

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Check Your Service Pack Lifecycle

Many people know about the support lifecycle site at Microsoft.  It contains information about the support policy for Microsoft products.  It allows you to look up a specific version of a Microsoft product and to see when support for that product ends.  It also explains the support phases that a product can travel through, and how…

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