.NET 4.6.2 and long paths on Windows 10

The Windows 10 Anniversary update is almost out the door. .NET 4.6.2 is in the update (as we’ve looked at in the past few posts). I’ve talked a bit about what we’ve done in 4.6.2 around paths, and how that is targeted at both allowing access to previously inaccessible paths and opens up the door for…

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More on new .NET path handling

In my prior post I talked briefly about the new path handling in .NET 4.6.2. In the latest drop (14367) PowerShell opts into both of the new behaviors so you can easily play around with the changes. There are two basic changes that can be controlled via two compatibility switches. The changes both originated in…

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New .NET path handling sneak peek

As mentioned I’m going to do the On .NET show in a couple weeks to talk about path changes in .NET. In the meantime, a little bit of fun for you if you’ve got the latest (14361) fast ring build for Windows 10 Anniversary Update… UPDATE: In the latest drop (14367) PowerShell opts into the new…

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Long paths in .NET

The answer is yes, we have done work to support long paths in Windows. As Windows unblocks MAX_PATH scenarios you’ll be able to take advantage with your .NET 4.6.2 applications. I plan to talk about what we’ve done with paths in both .NET Core and .NET 4.6.2 on an upcoming On .NET talk on June…

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Creating a SSCLI C# Template for Visual Studio

In my last post (MSBuild your SSCLI C# projects) I demonstrated how to create an MSBuild targets file for the SSCLI (Rotor).   In this post I’ll show you how to make it easier to use Visual Studio to develop SSCLI C# projects. To build successfully in VS you need to do a few things, notably: Override…

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MSBuild your SSCLI C# projects

[ Edit 22 Feb 2008: The complete SSCLI.CSharp.targets file can be found here. ] In my last post I got SSCLI compiling with the 2008 C++ compiler (SSCLI 2.0 and Visual Studio 2008).  (A side note: since it is clearly possible to build SSCLI with the compiler there is no reason you shouldn’t be able to get a VS Solution up and running that…

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Tools for Digging Deeper Into .NET

As I’ve been preparing more things to talk about I realized that it would be beneficial to have a list of tools to refer back to in my posts.  So here you go–a list of tools I find essential to development in .NET. The most important tool is Lutz Roeder’s .NET Reflector (http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/).  This powerful…

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Generic Collections IV

Back again, and as promised… Subclassing Generic Collections The framework provides three basic collections that are intended for derivation.  They are located in System.Collections.ObjectModel: Collection<T> KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem> ReadOnlyCollection<T> They are all intended to provide base implementations of the following interfaces: IList, IList<T> ICollection, ICollection<T> IEnumerable, IEnumerable<T> Collection<T> stores it’s data internally as IList<T> (and also takes IList<T> in…

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Generic Collections III

So far I’ve gone over the basics of generic collections and moved on to looking at List<T> and Predicate<T>.  As mentioned yesterday, this post will deal with subclassing and the other System delegate types. The “Other” System.Delegates  We’ve already looked at System.Predicate<T>.  Now we can turn our attention to the rest of the System deleagte types: Action<T>…

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Generic Collections II

In yesterday’s post I went over the very basics of generic collections in the 2.0 .Net framework.  Today I pick up where I left off with… Predicate<T> System.Predicate<T> is a generic delegate that is used to specify a search condition method to pass to the generic collections.  It simply takes an object of type <T>…

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