UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.6 Introduction to SDP

We are almost at the point where our Powershell commandlet will be useful, but first we need to learn about establishing the session protocol.  You see, SIP stands for “Session Initiation Protocol”.  The key here is the word “Initiation”.  Yup, SIP just manages telling so and so that so and so wants to talk to…

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UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.5 Setting up a session

In our next iteration, we will add to our commandlet to create a signaling session.  In essence we will send an INVITE to the other party so that we can send a message later.  There are a number of steps involved in setting up a session but for now we will just send the INVITE. …

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UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.4 Signing in and signing out

It’s about time that we began writing some code and getting into the details of the API.  To start out, I will cover the signaling part of UCMA.  Those of you who read my previous blog series on UCMA will find the next several posts very familiar. For some of you, learning the signaling APIs…

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UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.3 Powershell and UCMA

Today, we will get started with coding UCMA applications.  First though, I would like to cover again the Signaling namespace exposed by UCMA.  While much of this is not necessary when using the new Collaboration namespace, I feel that it is still important in terms of understanding how the API and SIP work. In a…

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UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.2 – Asynchronous pattern and threading model

Before you really start coding in UCMA 2.0, or even UCMA 1.0, it is extremely important that you understand the asynchronous pattern.  UCMA is designed for server applications, meaning it supports many operations occurring at the same time.  In order to best manage this, it uses an asynchronous model. For instance, let’s begin by discussing…

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UCMA 2.0 – Part 1.1 – High level architecture and design of UCMA

Let’s be honest, UCMA 1.0, while very useful, was a bit lame.  The frustrating thing about it was it opened up many new possibilities, but didn’t give you the chance to take advantage of them.  You could send messages to another party, but could not determine that user’s presence.  You also were very limited with…

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All types of fun with marshaling!

There are several golden rules that I have learned over the last week while spending some time PInvoking Win32 functions from C#. 1) The content at PInvoke.net can often not be trusted. 2) The overwhelming precentage of articles on the net explaining how to PInvoke certain methods can also not be trusted. The following are…

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Some tricks with service restart logic

Today I will venture outside the safe confines of Office Communications Server and discuss some quirks I have noticed with Windows services.  (Disclaimer: I am not in the Windows org so these are just my observations after some experimentation) Some of you may be aware that in the services control panel, you can right click…

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UCMA ships!

UCMA has finally shipped!  For those of you who would like to download it, the full download is at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=b30306e4-7dc1-44d2-9a68-9b4a6fc5c2df If you would like to see a webcast about UCMA, see the following. http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/WebCastEventDetails.aspx?culture=en-US&EventID=1032343097&CountryCode=US  Perhaps even nicer, the documentation for UCMA is also now on MSDN at http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb759538.aspx   UCMA allows you to create signaling applications…

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Unified Communications Client API shipped!

I just received an e-mail that the Unified Communications Client API has just shipped and is now available externally at  http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=82c468da-3294-4ca9-bbcc-d455cfd06af2&displaylang=en This API has two acronyms – UCCA and UCCP.  I have been calling it UCCA since I was instructed to by marketing (and the page above seems to confirm that acronym) but everywhere here…

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