Germany Votes Yes With Comments


We should have kids follow the Open XML votes as it would do more for their understanding of geography than Where Is Carmen Sandiego. Kids, today we are traveling to Germany.

The working group NIA 34 of the DIN (Deutsche Institut für Normung ) – the German National Body –  DIN OOXML Votehas voted Yes with comments for Open XML to become an ISO standard. Here is web link in German about this.

Gerd Schürman, Director eGovernment, Fraunhofer FOKUS, and Head of the DIN task force ‘Translation of Document Formats’ said this about the vote.

The standardization process of Open XML as an ISO standard will start now and result in the technological advancement of both standards – Open XML and ODF 1.0. The comments that were expressed by leading experts from the industry, science, public sector and politics together with the recommendation of the DIN committee, guide the way to interoperability. We will sustainably support this process in the Fraunhofer FOKUS eGovernment Laboratory and, as a member of ECMA International, provide our laboratory partner Microsoft assistance and know-how in implementing the recommendations.

So, this gets at the really important question that is being asked about what the implications are of yes with comments. I wrote yesterday about this given Ecma’s public statement that they will consider all comments – no matter if they come in as yes, no, or abstain. I will write a longer piece on this as it is really important question.

Focus on the long term though…

Keep in mind, September 2 is a really important milestone in the process but the BRM sometime in early 2008 is out there, and then there is another 30 days after that where national bodies may reconsider their votes. So – we are still a ways out on any final outcome. 


Comments (16)

  1. Germany just announced that their vote for Open XML will be “YES with comments”. The INCITS Executive

  2. Germany just announced that their vote for Open XML will be “YES with comments”. The INCITS Executive

  3. Jason has blogged about Germany’s announcement to Vote Yes with comments for Open XML on: http://blogs.msdn.com/jasonmatusow/archive/2007/08/22/germany-votes-yes-with-comments.aspx

  4. Imi cer scuze fata de cei care s-au saturat de postarile mele legate de standardizarea Open XML, dar

  5. I was out for the past week at a family event in Winnipeg. I didn’t have any access to e-mail or internet

  6. I was out for the past week at a family event in Winnipeg. I didn't have any access to e-mail or

  7. Andy says:

    shame, shame. MS stuffed the German committees. dialogika, fokus, DstGB  and other Microsoft partners. It is not about the argument anymore, why we need a second but broken document format. It is all about telling the world that 1+1=3 because enough people are in the committee.

    If Germany had comments the vote must be NO with comments.

  8. John Scholes says:

    Ecma will consider all comments.

    When you write your longer piece, please explain this carefully. Surely it is up to JTC1, not Ecma, how these comments are dealt with.

    In fact, JTC1 has a fairly elaborate procedure (the Ballot Resolution Meeting) for dealing with comments. It is entirely possible that ISO/IEC could end up adopting the original draft amended by some, but not all, of the comments submitted by National Bodies.

  9. jasonmatusow says:

    John – you are absolutely right. Someone internally sent me a mail clarifying this for me as she saw I had mistated it.

    1) DIS 29500, if approved, becomes a JTC1 standard and is in their hands for maitenance. JTC1 will likely work closely with TC45, but fundamentally you are correct.

    2) Yes, JTC1 has an elaborate BRM process and I think there will be significant work between now and then that should keep us all busy commenting on the various elements invovled.

    Thx

    Jason

  10. Today the results of the United States vote for Open XML were made public. The INCITS Executive Board

  11. Today the results of the United States vote for Open XML were made public. The INCITS Executive Board

  12. jean says:

    "Keep in mind, September 2 is a really important milestone in the process but the BRM sometime in early 2008 is out there, and then there is another 30 days after that where national bodies may reconsider their votes. So – we are still a ways out on any final outcome."

    Is it 30 days after the 2nd of September where countries can reconsider their votes?

  13. jasonmatusow says:

    Hi Jean –

    No, the work begins on the comments following the Sept. 2 close of the ballot. Then, the ballot resolution meeting (BRM) gets scheduled at some point – which is likely to be in the first few months of 2008. Following the BRM, votes may be changed based on that meeting.

    Hope that helps.

    Jason

  14. Clearly things are heating up to a fever pitch this week. September 2 is just around the corner and the