Thin Clients – Web clients

The late 1990’s saw growth in the Internet through the utilization of an underutilized network infrastructure and the browser wars. PC’s were everywhere and they contained an application Host (IE, Netscape, Mozilla, etc..) for running code (script). Corporate IT departments were overburdened with the support off all the thick client application components. As upgrades for…

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Taking advantage of the distribution of power – Rich Clients

The superior usability of the PC with its mouse for input and the ability to quickly relay information in a language neutral manner via a graphical user interface became the client platform with which we could develop rich applications. These applications were rich in functionality since they could take advantage of local (client PC’s) processing…

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Let’s get personal

Around the late 1980’s Personal Computers (PC’s) were starting to provide functionality suited to individual user usages like word processing and spreadsheet functionality. This brought processing and data storage down to the user and away from the central server and mainframe (“big iron”) environments. As PC’s became more affordable and the need for computing power…

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We get smarter as we evolve

Back in 1984 I was attending college and the classes reflected the current computing architecture. I took Assembly, Cobol, CICS, and DL1. Assembly and Cobol where the languages of choice for mainframe applications. Cobol was a higher level language and had a lot of native support for reporting functionality. Whereas, Assembly (Assembler) was about as…

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Introduction

The idea of what constitutes a Smart Client Application and the architecture to support this model very much chronicles the evolution of my career.  So I decided to blog about this subject in the hopes of sharing, debating, and contributing to this evolution.  In this post, I will briefly touch on what constitutes a Smart Client…

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