HTML5 : Microsoft Participation in the W3C HTML Working Group


W3chtml5wg I’m Paul Cotton, Group Manager, Web Services Standards and Partners, in the Interoperability Strategy Team. I’m in charge of a team that works on web services standards and interoperability.  My team is involved in W3C, OASIS, WS-I, Apache and ISO/IEC JTC1 and cooperates with the vendor and user communities to advance interoperability of the WS-* specifications.  In addition, I am co-chair of the W3C HTML Working Group that is developing the next version of HTML.


The Web has grown significantly over the last decade based largely on the interoperability of the W3C HTML4 Recommendation.  HTML forms the backbone of interoperability on the Web and the specification is being evolved at the W3C as part of the HTML5 effort.  Along with many other companies and individuals, Microsoft is contributing significant resources and expertise to work with the W3C to ensure the success of the HTML5 efforts (see this blog post [http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/09/Working-with-the-HTML5-Community.aspx]). 


I had a chance to sit down last week with Philippe Le Hégaret who’s a staff member of the W3C, to discuss Microsoft’s view on HTML5 interoperability and our work in the HTML WG. Please read the minutes of  the interview on the W3C blog: “Interview: Paul Cotton on Microsoft Participation in the W3C HTML Working Group


Paul Cotton

Comments (2)

  1. Alex Turner says:

    Interesting post and an interesting interview linked. However, "The Web has grown significantly over the last decade based largely on the interoperability of the W3C HTML4 Recommendation." that is a stretch IMHO. HTML4 has been important, but it seems that stuff outside the specification – like AJAX – has been more important technically. Further, a lot of web growth has actually centred around totally non HTML stuff like FLASH.

    I don’t think it is clear what HTML5 is even for, especially now that WebSockets have been taken out. I have a sinking feeling that HTML5 will bog down into an overweight specification which will cause an overall reduction in inter-op rather than an increase. Much as the ANSI2002 specification for COBOL did (for example).

    As I said here http://nerds-central.blogspot.com/2010/03/big-web-dynamics-shift-fat-cat.html I suspect that the age of the Web ‘leaders’ is an indication that the Web is loosing its energy and becoming far too bureaucratic and special interest centred. If we keep going this way, W3C will become irrelevant and the threat of commercial interests trying to gain leverage via differentiation in supported protocols will re-emerge is a more virulent form than it did even in the mid nineties.

    KISS guys!

  2. shuvo1 says:

    Have an intention to start with Microsoft. Also interested to work W3 HTML information worker.