Working with the HTML5 Community


We’re always excited to engage with members of the W3C including the developers of other browsers as well as the broader web development community to help shape the direction of emerging Web standards, particularly HTML5.  This includes participating in events like TPAC, which we wrote about in November, and on-going engagement with various working groups.  Patrick recently talked about joining the SVG working group, and I’d like to share a brief list of other happenings on the way to making HTML5 well-defined, well-tested, and accessible:

  • Providing feedback on HTML5
    Tony Ross, Internet Explorer Program Manager, and Jonas Sicking of Mozilla, led a discussion about extensibility in HTML5 at TPAC after our initial submission.  While the working group hasn’t resolved the issue yet, we think the event helped inform everyone and generate the different proposals submitted since. 
  • Testing HTML5
    Kris Krueger, Internet Explorer Test Lead, was appointed facilitator of the W3C HTML5 Testing Task Force.  The task force has set up necessary infrastructure like a wiki, Bugzilla, a work item tracker, and CVS repository for test cases.  With that in place, they’ve started to review DOM Level 2 HTML test cases to use as the start of HTML5 testing.  As with CSS2.1, we think a good test suite is critical to ensuring a specification results in interoperable implementations.
  • Ensuring new specifications enable accessibility
    We care deeply about an accessible web so besides implementing accessibility-focused browser features, we’re working with Apple, IBM, and other interested parties to ensure the new HTML5 <canvas> and <video> elements have great accessibility support so everyone can use sites leveraging them.  This work is driven by the Accessibility Task Force.  Together, we’re working on <canvas> HTML prototypes to use as ‘proof of concepts’ to ensure the feature is well-designed, as discussed in a recent teleconference
  • Indexed DB Proposal
    Together with Mozilla, we’re excited about a new design for local storage called Indexed DB.  We think this is a great solution for the web.  Look for another post with more information about this proposal.  In the meantime, you can read the latest working draft
  • DOM Level 3 Events
    Travis Leithead, Internet Explorer Program Manager, continues to help close down open issues with the latest editor’s draft. It’s been awhile since the working group published the last working draft and the group plans to publish an update soon that will improve clarity for implementers and web authors alike. On a recent teleconference, we noted that DOM Level 2 Events was published as a Recommendation nearly 10 years ago; it’s exciting to have the next milestone in sight!

Finally, you can read an interview with Paul Cotton from Microsoft and co-Chair of the W3C HTML Working Group on the W3C Blog.

Adrian Bateman
Program Manager

Comments (66)

  1. Anonymous says:

    HTML5 rigor is outstanding. Just like going up against Jenner when you’re still crawling on all fours.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Great, all I need is a newer, more powerful way for marketing scum to put their filthy hands into my filesystem.

  3. Jon says:

    Before the complainers arrive, just want to say great stuff! Can’t wait for Mix to arrive to see what you guys have been working on in action!

  4. Avo Kicchi says:

    In before ridiculous and unrealistic comments about IE needing to switch to Safari.

    Great work! Can’t wait to play around with this whenever it all gets implemented.

  5. Retro says:

    Nice summary.  Will need to take a long hard look at these papers.

    Much as I’ve not been fond of IE for a long time, by the sounds of it you’re putting your efforts where they’re needed.  Looking forward to seeing what comes from this.

  6. Rob says:

    Too bad such an effort isn’t being put into IE9 but at least you’re helping get the HTML5 spec going for the other more modern, advanced browsers that will actually implement this stuff.

  7. Searcher says:

    good news, but what about compatibility with latest versions of CSS ?

  8. Tame says:

    Nice of you guys to remember the DOM Events spec actually exists!

    Yes, it has been 10 years and yes, that means IE is 10 years behind every other browser on earth. It’s very exciting to "have the next milestone in sight", but does that mean that IE9 will finally have some support for it, or are we going to have to wait another 10 years ?

  9. Web 3.0 will be about websites replacing applications and applications replacing the OS.

    So with that in mind the most critical thing that I would like to shed some light on is importNode and event listeners. No browser from my previous testing correctly executed attached events to imported nodes (via AJAX). That means having to use JavaScript XHTML attributes such as <element onclick="" onfocus="", etc.

    I’m excited about Mix and I’m very much looking forward to next week’s announcements among other things.

  10. Andrew says:

    ‘That means having to use JavaScript XHTML attributes such as <element onclick="" onfocus="", etc.’

    Uh, no. More like jQuery/MooTools/etc and addEventListener (manually). Separate functionality from output and separate design from content. Inline styles and Javascript events are being deprecated.

  11. PhistucK says:

    Yes, I am also interested. Will Internet Explorer 9 support standard JavaScript like "addEventListener"?

  12. ZippyV says:

    In the DOM Level 3 Events WD I didn’t see anything about touch based events. Now that touch based devices are becoming more popular, is the working group thinking about that too?

  13. Andrea says:

    Great! I really believe you are excited in doing everything you are doing and it’s obvious, this job needs a lot of enthusiasm….

    But, what’s the matter?? What, who, and why makes you keep IE8 10 years behind ?

    Is it a commercial strategy?

    Lack of human resources?

  14. Paul McKeown says:

    Good to see you are back with the program!

  15. Lambros Vasiliou says:

    What about XHTML 2.0 and why is W3C moving two different standards forward?

  16. vasko_dinkov says:

    "On a recent teleconference, we noted that DOM Level 2 Events was published as a Recommendation nearly 10 years ago…"

    and you are still not supporting it in any released product. :)

    But, anyway, from what you are posting recently on this blog, I get the feeling you have big plans for IE9. Sincerely hope that’s true!

  17. Sort of me too to vasko.

    DOM Level 3 Events are nice, but it would mean much more to my work if you supported Level 2. And that includes Mutation Events.

  18. Jon says:

    @Lambros

    The W3C is not moving forward with XHTML 2.0, the charter for the working group expired at the end of 2009 and was not renewed. See here: http://www.w3.org/News/2009#entry-6601

    The only HTML standard that the W3C is working on is HTML5.

  19. @Andrew Read people’s posts before jumping to reply; I was advocating *FOR* event listeners to work correctly with imported XML.

  20. gmilano says:

    What about websockets, is IE working on this?

  21. billybob says:

    Does this mean that IE 9 is going to implement the HTML5 spec fully?  Or does it meant that you plan to work on the spec and then finally implement it when it is W3C Recommendation in 2022?

    We need information so that we can plan our long-term projects.  Will IE 9 support the code that we are writing now?  This blog was supposed to be all about communicating with developers but it has become a place for IE program managers to blow their own trumpet.

    I suppose that is why companies like Google go to all the effort of writing Chrome Frame because nobody knows when, if and how much of HTML5 you are likely to support.  At least we can rely on them.

  22. WithAClue says:

    It is currently impossible for anyone to "implement the HTML5 spec fully" as there is no full HTML5 spec.

    Ask for specific features and you demonstrate that you understand reality. Ask for sweeping generalizations that don’t understand the basic facts and you should rightly be ignored.

  23. steve says:

    Wow, what an amazing post.  I’m speechless.

    ———————————————

    Ok, so I’m quite glad to read this it looks like Microsoft is *really* making an effort now! Welcome back to the open web!

    I do have a few concerns though:

    1. DOM level 3 events – yeah sounds great but currently NO version of IE supports the DOM level 2 events that we’ve been waiting a decade for.

    2. Canvas – I take it that "proof of concept" is marketing speak for "we are not committing to anything yet" – thats fine, but please keep us posted!

    3. HTML Extensibility proposal – I’m torn. I agree in concept but I fear massive abuse and mis-use.  We’ve all seen the HTML generated from Word, Excel and similar and have *ZERO* interest in seeing markup like that becoming common.

    4. Bugzilla and CVS in the same sentence – this acceptance of free/open source tools is quite a brave step.  Hopefully Microsoft can see beyond these to other areas that need it. E.g. MSIE public (always open) bug tracking.

    5. Indexed DB & working with Mozilla – awesome! Glad to see MSFT working with other browser vendors rather than against. (or at least appearing that way)

    Thanks for this bit of transparency – please keep it up!

  24. Carlos says:

    @Adrian

    Thanks for your update about "engagemente with the HTML5 Community"

    By the way, could you tell us something about what are your developers actually *coding* in IE?

    I mean, are they implementing Canvas support? the video element? SVG?

    Please, keep us informed, thanks!

           carlos

  25. Solrac says:

    Carlos: The obvious answer to your question is "No, he can’t" tell you, which is why he didn’t.

  26. Will Peavy says:

    Awesome, this is great news. … I can’t wait to get my hands on a build of IE9

  27. hAl says:

    Don’t ask about futuere features at all here but just wait for the MIX10 event.

  28. Very nice to see where IE is involved in creating a more consistent web experience for users.

  29. Phil says:

    Sounds good.  I’ll be interested to see what features under discussion do hit IE 9 (and become public knowledge after MIX) but what interested me is the comment that a bugzilla has been set up.  When IE 8 was in development, a lot of people on the blog were screaming they couldn’t access a public bug tracker.  Will the bugzilla be opened up so that developers of websites and testers can actually file bugs and see what is being done about them?

    Microsoft – when you really start to listen to the community, you will build a much better product.  Really.  Make it available to the public.

  30. Reader says:

    @Phil: The author said that Bugzilla was set up for the HTML5 **testcases** not IE.

  31. So what about support for XHTML 1.0 and XHTML 1.1? They have been standards since how many years now? As far as I now Internet Explorer has zero support for them. Actually there are even parts of HTML 4 that don’t work in Internet Explorer. Planning for HTML5 seems really backwards if you leave HTML4, XHTML 1.0 and XHTML 1.1 unimplemented.

  32. Tony Ross [MSFT] says:

    @John

    > No browser from my previous testing correctly executed attached events to imported nodes (via AJAX).

    The behavior you’re seeing is actually in compliance with the DOM Level 3 Core and Events specifications. Cloning operations do not clone registered event listeners.

    In DOM L3 Core, an explicit description of what should be copied is given. Event listeners are simply not included in the list. On the other hand, attributes are in the list, which is why markup-based event registration survives the import.

    In DOM L3 Events, this requirement is stated more directly, explicitly forbidding copying event listeners when copying a node.

    You can read the full details at:

    http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Core/core.html#Core-Document-importNode

    and

    http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Events/#interface-EventListener

    If non-markup-based event listeners are desired on the imported node, you’ll have to re-register them after the import.

  33. Phil says:

    @Reader – true.  I got all excited when I saw an MS employee use the word "bugzilla".  The idea of an open bug-tracking system got me so giddy there for a second I lost my mind. </sarcasm>

    Would still be nice if they did have an open bug tracker for IE 9 though… any comment, MSFT’s?

  34. adam says:

    ok .. let us say that IE is having more steps towards the standards .. great .. but late ..because when will the standard copmpliant version of IE be at a degree of popularity that allows developpers to write standard compliant code trusting it will be readable to the majority of IE audience ?! It still will be years for developpers writing specific codes to ( specific ) legacy IEs

  35. @Tony Ross [MSFT] Thank you very much for your reply. The problem is that one can not attach an event listener to content imported via an AJAX request as there is naturally no way JavaScript can attach an event to code not yet received from the server. What I attempted was to scan imported XML for certain id’s and should an id be found then attach the event listener.

    By cloning I can only make a guess that the original XML document is still somehow co-existing even after it’s content has been imported to the DOM? I’m presuming this by the phrase, ‘without altering or removing the source node from the original document’ in reference to importNode. Would be it that after using importNode one has to somehow discard the XML file that was loaded via AJAX and *then* scan and attach events? For clarification all the id’s are unique.

  36. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    John, can you clarify your question a bit? How are you "importing" your content specifically?

    How specifically were you attempting to attach an event listener?

  37. carlos says:

    "Carlos: The obvious answer to your question is "No, he can’t" tell you, which is why he didn’t."

    So, basically the IE response is:

    "sorry folks, but we can’t say nothing about what is really happing in IE; stay tuned and keep listening about conferences, engagements, talks, and the like"

  38. Travis Leithead [MSFT] says:

    @ZippyV

    The WebApps working group is working on rechartering and including a specific deliverable for "touch and gesture" events.

  39. blah says:

    I know Microsoft loves deleting my posts, but the fact remains that more powerful client-side storage technology will simply be abused by design by marketers. It must be a preemptive move in light of everyone wanting to dump Flash, thanks to strides in the latest (real) browsers. But as usual, Microsoft is the biggest roadblock to progress. Everybody who takes them seriously right now is dead guilty of ‘fool me thrice’.

  40. @Adrian Bateman [MSFT]

    Listening and communicating with other browser manufacturers and making an effort is one thing.

    Fully supporting and correctly implementing technical specs is another. "Results" in test suites is another. Fixing confirmed, reproducible and testcase-ed bug reports is also another.

    Your post leaves many unanswered questions.

    1- IE8 fails over 150 testcases in CSS 2.1 test suite: will they all be fixed in IE9?

    2- Bugs in HTML 4.01: will they all be fixed in IE9?

    3- DOM level 2 Events: will such technical recommendation be implemented in IE9? A lot of people expect a "yes" here.

    Why mention a WD of DOM 3 Events?

    4- "We care deeply about an accessible web (…)".

    There are many accessibility issues, problems, failures and bugs in IE8 and undeniable UAAG failures. Will IE9 address those issues and fix them?

    Will Microsoft issue a VPAT regarding IE9?

    5- DOM 2 Core: will the bugs in IE8 be fixed in IE9?

    6- DOM 2 HTML: will the bugs in IE8 be fixed in IE9?

    7- Will connect IE beta feedback be improved so that a testcase can be attached, so that components can be chosen, so that information fields can be set by IE team: e.g. fields like severity, gravity, importance, priority, target, etc.? All of the things that other browser manufacturers (bugzilla.mozilla.org, bugs.webkit.org, bugs.kde.org, bugzilla.w3.org, etc) have been provided during years, often through bugzilla.

    8- As far as I can say, canvas and video are sufficiently stable and defined that IE9 could implement those.

    9- SVG: will you implement SVG 1.1 in IE9? SVG tiny?

    10- Will IE9 support XHTML served as application/xhtml+xml?

    11- CSSOM view module: Will IE9 fully comply with such spec?

    12- DOM 2 Traversal and DOM 2 Range are now over 10 years old. And they are not implemented in IE8.

    etc..

    There can not be a lot of nuances, hesitations, "yes, but…" and "maybe, but.." with those questions. Some specs have been ignored by Microsoft Internet Explorer for over 10 years now and Microsoft Internet Explorer has been failing a lot of testcases for over 10 years and it’s still true in IE8.

    regards, Gérard Talbot

  41. hAl says:

    @Gerard Talbot

    Is there a list of those 150 fails in the CSS 2.1 testsuite that you claim?

    Afre all of those CSS 2.1 test fails or are there spec ambiguity issues in there as well?

  42. SocialGraces says:

    Gerard, it was fun as always to read your interrogation. I predict that, as always, it will be ignored.

    >Will Microsoft issue a VPAT regarding IE9?

    Microsoft issues a VPAT for every one of their major products. How do you know what a VPAT is and not know that?

  43. jesse says:

    @Mr Talbot – I agree with all questions!

    I too would like to know all of those with specific interest in:

    "Will connect IE beta feedback be improved"

    The current (now closed) IE Feedback using Connect is just shy of an utter failure.

    If users can’t submit refined test cases and in turn test/refine other users’ submitted test cases then your bug tracking is doomed.

    A closed bug tracking system (as in not open, as well as shut!) does not work!

    History of pseudo-public bug tracking for IE.

    The IE7 bug tracking system, full of great bug reports – closed and deleted.

    The IE8 bug tracking system, full of great bug reports – closed (and deleted???)

    MSFT has officially cried wolf twice now.

    If you want *anyone* to submit bugs for IE9 (and beyond) your bug tracking must be:

    a.) public

    b.) open (not to ever be closed)

    c.) enable test case submission, refinement and download/run options

    d.) written commitment of the above

    If these simple things are not in place for future IE bug tracking – we have no interest in participating at all.

  44. KingOfEngland says:

    Unless that’s the "royal we", jesse, I’d advise you to speak for yourself.

  45. jesse says:

    @KingOfEngland – I’m using "we" as a general term for those that have dedicated hours entering bug reports in the IE7 and IE8 bug tracker only to have it all deleted.. and very little if any fixed.

    I have no objection whatsoever to helping build a better IE by supplying good test cases and verifying bugs in IE.  I object (as do all contributors I’ve spoken to) to wasting my efforts in a system that doesn’t work well, gets shut down regularly, and doesn’t supply a mechanism to upload, review, edit and re-submit test cases.

    We’ve been led to believe that this will all be fixed and get better several times now.  Now the difference is that there is history.  There’s a chance for MSFT to change history here and make good – however if they decide not to, and developers don’t help out – don’t be at all surprised.

    If the KingOfEngland isn’t part of that "we", then by all means continue on – "we" have better things to do if we want to waste time.

    And seriously – the capatcha thing on this blog is broken. I don’t have any other tabs or windows open yet I still get errors.

  46. PhistucK says:

    Well, here is my suggestion. We can set up an issue tracker ourselves and post everything you post on the closed tracker there.

    Of course, we will also have scheduled back ups for the tracker, so if anyone shuts it down, the issues are safe. Microsoft will have access to the security issues and the rest of the issues will have unrestricted access for everyone.

    If everything goes alright and as planned, this can become the biggest unofficial issue tracker and will probably get some attention from Microsoft.

    Anyone thinks that this is a good idea?

    If you do, I will set up an issue tracker at GoogleCode for that.

    Votes?

  47. @EricLaw [MSFT] I take it would be better to setup a standalone test case and file a report on Connect? Whenever we’re able to test out a build of IE9 I’ll spend the time to create and post the test case. Hope Mix goes smooth for the whole team. :-)

  48. Daniel says:

    @Bertil Wennergren: Please infor yourself, HTML5 replaces HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.0

    And about XHTML 1.1: None of the big 5 implements this standard, it is actually not implementable because it’s incompatible to XHTMl 1.0 – this problem was reportet so many times to the W3C but never solved. With HTML5 on the Horizon I can’t think of a reason why XHTML 1.1 is needed (frankly, I’m a XHTML supporter, but frankly, I never saw an advantage in 1.1).

  49. Jon says:

    While I agree Connect is incredibly poor, I don’t think it’s fair to lay everything at the IE team’s door. Connect is clearly a pan-Microsoft project with its own development team. Unfortunately the team seems to be made up of people who were good enough to get on any other product team.

    I do think that a public, non-MS managed bug tracker would be an excellent idea though.

  50. Phil says:

    @PhistucK – sounds like a plan to me.

    @jesse – the Captcha works fine under Firefox… no issues here.

  51. FremyCompany says:

    I agree with others when they say the Connect site is a fail. I reported many bugs for IE8, but I’ve been under the impression many unuseful questions were asked, while what really maters was difficult to publish (test cases, side notes, …)

  52. Todd says:

    So how come IE isn’t cross-platform?

    How can you seriously expect web developers to develop with IE in mind when you only make it available for Windows?

    Safari? Available for Mac and Windows.

    Chrome? Available for Mac and Windows.

    Firefox? Available for Mac and Windows.

    IE? Internet Explorer 8 is available only on PCs running Windows.

    Oops.

    Now why would I bother wasting time developing with IE in mind if you don’t even bother coming out with a version of IE for people not running Windows?

  53. TheObvious says:

    <<<why would I bother wasting time developing with IE in mind>>>

    Because two out of three Internet users are using IE?

  54. @Todd

    > How can you seriously expect web developers to develop with IE in mind when you only make it available for Windows?

    > why would I bother wasting time developing with IE in mind if you don’t even bother coming out with a version of IE for people not running Windows?

    Those questions were answered more than 11 years ago in "Netscape Standards Challenge":

    "

    (…) standards-compliant browser provides developers and end users with the following benefits: (…)

    # reduced cost for content and application development by enabling development to a single specification

    (…)

    # freedom of choice by reducing switching costs between vendors and applications

    (…)

    Web standards were not designed or intended to be used in isolation from each other, with only piecemeal support of their features, or on specific platforms only. Web standards provide a platform-, vendor-, and device-independent foundation

    "

    Internet Archive Wayback Machine on this link:

    home.netscape.com/browsers/future/standards.html

    If IE8 was truly web-standards-compliant with stable, mature web standards (HTML 4, CSS 2.1, DOM 2 interfaces, ECMAscript 3rd edition, etc), then web developers would not have to test any of their web-standards-compliant webpages in any particular web browser.

    Right now, the latest IE version still dramatically fails publicly accessible test suites on DOM 1 Core, DOM 2 HTML, DOM 2 Events, DOM 2 Core and over 150 CSS 2.1 test suite testcases.

    One last detail. Chrome is available under Linux. Opera is available under all 3 major operating systems. Konqueror 4.4 can be used in all 3 major operating systems.

    regards, Gérard Talbot

  55. Paulo says:

    Drop the time wasted and use webkit!

    You’ll save lives of millions of developers around the globe, and stop IE menace once for all!

    Else we will start pushing Chrome Frame on all IEs as a must plugin, just like flash did :D

  56. Paulo says:

    Really: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/firefox-chrome-opera,2558-10.html

    Or try to run IE on Sputnik and feel the fail http://sputnik.googlelabs.com/

    will take years until IE catches up with others browser, PLEASE use webkit or even Gecko, and save us

  57. aza says:

    please add opacity, text-indent, text-shadow and border-radius css3 attributes in IE9!

    And also proper @font-face which can load ttf and otf fonts anti-alias!

  58. hAl says:

    @Gerard Talbot

    I looked at some of your issues on you page.

    I have a question on issue 10

    "10- Images should be underlined in the following testcases:"

    That issue actually contradicts the CSS 2.1 spec on text-decoration that states:

    "Underlines, overlines, and line-throughs are applied only to text (including white space, letter spacing, and word spacing): margins, borders, and padding are skipped. If an element contains no text, user agents must refrain from rendering these text decorations on the element. For example, images will not be underlined"

    Why are you listing this as a CSS3 issue against IE because it would seem more prudent at this time to still follow the CSS 2.1 spec as the CSS3 spec on text decoration does not seem finished yet.

  59. "@Bertil Wennergren: Please infor yourself, HTML5 replaces HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.0"

    Replaces? Both will be vastly used for years, probably decades. HTML5 is not even a finished standard, and it’s not much used. So it’s ridiculous to ignore the standards that are here now, are being used now, and focus only on a standard that is yet to come.

    I support HTML5, but browsers need to support HTML 4 and XHTML 1.0 first. Then they can move on to HTML5.

    Do you really think that Microsoft will drop all support for HTML 4, just because HTML "replaces" it?

    "And about XHTML 1.1: None of the big 5 implements this standard, it is actually not implementable because it’s incompatible to XHTML 1.0".

    Of course it is implementable. It works quite well in Firefox. I use it a lot. But XHTML 1.1 is indeed not used very much. If MSIE fully supported HTML 4 and XHTML 1.0, but not XHTML 1.1., I wouldn’t complain very loudly.

  60. Geminiman says:

    I would bet that Web 3.0 is the rise of the application for sure. But not HTML or a browser. I would bet that the future of the web is application stores, and applications deployed and updated transparently Silverlight, Flash or app-style like the iphone etc.

    I would bet also that the web will cease to be the "web" and just be "that application I use".  And yes, most applications will continue to run on the device, they will not be hosted like HTML. But they will be fully and transparently updated from the server, and the server will host all of the data.

    HTML 5 will be a standard without an application very soon. (just look at facebook use which is skyrocketing in specific apps and flat-lining in the browser)

  61. Open Web says:

    http://www.neowin.net/news/windows-phone-7-browser-is-based-on-internet-explorer-7

    MS still sabotaging open web standards by pushing outdated, obsolete browsers that can’t even render Acid2 correctly.

  62. Banned in Boston says:

    RE: "DOM level 2 Events" — this should have been implemented in IE *7*, much less IE8!

    So having it–finally–arrive in IE_9_ is underwhelming, to say the least.

    Since take-up of IE9 will (presumably) take quite some time after it is released (as with previous releases of IE), Developers will still have to deal with IE_8_ for a long time to come.

    Effectively, it means we STILL can’t use a standard event model. At least until the installed base of IE8 (and earlier versions) goes way down. Or, maybe, when IE10 comes out.

    NOT impressed.

  63. PhistucK says:

    Wow, I am impressed. I really thought addEventListener (and such) would be skipped again.

    Congratulations for starting in the right way.

    I also like the planned 8 week updates (though I would have preferred even less, say, almost weekly updates, like the Google Chrome Dev channel releases).

    By the way, GMail is not working (you can reach the inbox, but nothing works there) in IE9 standards mode. A JavaScript error is triggered. I suppose it is because of the not yet supported stuff, but maybe not. Hopefully, it would be more usuable later.

    Also, what about the Video and Audio tags? come on.

    Nice progress. :)

  64. PhistucK says:

    Wow, I am impressed. I really thought addEventListener (and such) would be skipped again.

    Congratulations for starting in the right way.

    I also like the planned 8 week updates (though I would have preferred even less, say, almost weekly updates, like the Google Chrome Dev channel releases).

    By the way, GMail is not working (you can reach the inbox, but nothing works there) in IE9 standards mode. A JavaScript error is triggered. I suppose it is because of the not yet supported stuff, but maybe not. Hopefully, it would be more usable later.

    Also, what about the Video and Audio tags? come on.

    Nice progress. :)

  65. JustinSC [MSFT] says:

    @Gerard Talbot

    Regarding your 7th point – we are definitely working to improve the Connect experience.  Connect already supports attachments, so you can submit test cases – however, it’s true that they’re not currently visible to other users.  There are privacy concerns that have made this a challenge.  That said, in the coming months you can expect improvements to the IE Connect experience that will impact state fields and attachments.

    @jesse

    If you check our recent blog posts you’ll see we’re addressing many of your comments.

    @Jon

    Thank you for raising a very important point.  I encourage people with feedback for the Connect tool itself to direct it to their Connect Improvement site: http://connect.microsoft.com/connect/

  66. PhistucK says:

    Everyone – you can spread the word.

    The unofficial public tracker for Internet Explorer is now up and running at GoogleCode.

    http://code.google.com/p/openbrowserissuetracker/issues/list

    I am posting this comment twice – one for this post and one for the newest post.

    Note that if it does not receive the proper attention after a certain amount of time, I will cease to maintain it.