Fixing Reliability Issues in IE8


In a previous post, Andy wrote about some of the new features we introduced to improve reliability in Internet Explorer, such as Loosely Coupled IE and Automatic Crash Recovery. These features help minimize the impact of reliability issues (such as crashes and hangs) once our users encounter them, allowing them to return to their original browsing state as soon as possible.

From an engineering perspective, our goal is to minimize the occurrences of these issues in the first place. In today’s post I’d like to walk you through the various approaches we use to identify, prioritize and address reliability issues in IE8. Each of these approaches covers different angles of the product and is equally useful in ensuring a reliable experience for different types of users.

End-user Feedback

Users are our greatest resource for feedback pertaining to reliability issues. We receive lots of information from our feedback channels about specific problems that users are experiencing. We also leverage Windows Error Reporting, which sends details of user-reported crashes and hangs back to Microsoft. The accumulation of these reports helps us understand overall browser reliability in customer environments and enables us to identify our top issues.

In last month’s post, I described how we used a failure curve to identify and fix reliability issues for IE8 on the Windows 7 Beta. We follow a similar approach when we ship a new IE release. Below you can see the failure curve for the top crashes and hangs caused by IE in the IE8 Beta cycle. The data is based on snapshots taken 50 days after each IE8 pre-release. The green bars indicate failures that have been fixed in IE8.

 chart of IE failures.  Each bar is a failure issue.  It is sorted by number of occurences.  The graph is in the shape of the right side of a bell curve.

A failure curve typically shows that a small number of failures impact a large number of users. These are represented by the leftmost bars on the curve and are most likely crashes in mainstream scenarios. The issues in the “long tail” are generally encountered in specific hardware and software configurations. While these bugs are important to fix, we focus our efforts on the most impactful issues first and systematically work our way down the failure curve. The top remaining issues that are not addressed in time will be fixed and shipped to customers in future security updates. To date, we have fixed 80% of all the reported crashes and hangs in IE8.

Feature Testing

Reliability testing starts from the feature level and helps maximize product quality from the ground up. The owners for each feature run automation on their new code to identify and fix key stability issues. These people are also the most prominent users of their respective features, and would be able to encounter any issues that are not discovered via automation. Therefore, the majority of stability issues for a certain feature are identified and addressed during this phase.

In addition, teams leverage several mechanisms that scan through and identify potential faults in their source code, such as buffer overruns, memory leaks, or uninitialized memory. Many of these faults could have become top crashes and hangs in the public, but our teams work to fix the issues before they are even encountered internally.

Internal Product Usage

Amongst the IE team and other divisions throughout Microsoft, thousands of people are using the latest versions of IE8 every day. One critical benefit of this internal network is that we can work directly with the employee who encountered a crash to investigate and fix it quickly, often debugging directly into their machines.

Internal users send us crash and hang data through Windows Error Reporting as well. We use their data to fix the most impactful issues seen in recent builds. The shape of the failure curve generated via internal data can be a good approximation of what we see from the public as well.

For example, many of our internal users upgraded to the Windows 7 Beta build several weeks before it was publicly available. The data generated from the extensive Beta-testing allowed us to create a preliminary failure curve. We began to investigate a handful of crashes that were clearly the most impactful issues. By fixing these crashes ahead of time we stayed ahead of our failure curve, and were able to swiftly address the remaining issues after the Beta was released.

Lab Reliability Testing

To discover crashes in more far-reaching usage scenarios, we perform a series of tests on lab machines to continuously monitor for new issues in recent builds. We employ two common techniques often referred to as Stress and Long Haul testing.

Stress Testing    
Stress testing the browser is critical to identifying architectural bugs and other hidden issues. Our goal is to be able to stress-test IE8 for a defined period of time without interruptions. To measure this, we rapidly navigate to websites and perform user actions such as opening and closing tabs and windows. We hope to identify important issues that may not be seen from regular browsing behavior. Over the course of a day, it’s possible for our stress tests to navigate the same browser instance to over 100,000 web pages!

Long Haul Testing
Part of our vision for IE8 reliability is to allow users to run IE for as long as they desire without interruptions. We devise different types of tests to simulate long term usage of the browser and measure how long the tests can run before experiencing a crash or running out of memory. We then engage with teams to get the top issues fixed as soon as possible. We also run tests to track memory consumption after long periods of usage.

Summary

Each of the above approaches has played an important role in driving reliability improvements in IE8. In fact, we are able to quantify these improvements using various tests and analyses, and compare our results to IE7. For example, we are now able to run stress tests continuously for over 12 hours on IE8, compared to less than 8 hours on IE7. Also, we found that IE8 uses up 90% less memory than IE7 after running continuously for 24 hours under Long Haul testing.

We’re convinced that our approaches to identifying reliability issues have generated significant stability improvements to IE8. We encourage you to try out Internet Explorer 8 today and send us your feedback. We rely on your collective feedback to determine the most important reliability issues to address in future releases. If you experience a crash or hang please be sure to let us know by submitting an error report.

Thank you for your help in ensuring that IE8 is such a great product!

Herman Ng
Program Manager

Comments (93)

  1. df says:

    Herman,

    I might be the only one reading this:

    "The data is based on snapshots taken 50 days after each IE8 pre-release."

    to be honest, it doesn’t make sense to overlaps error reports from different builds.

    Let’s imagine a scenario:

    If your team introduces a frequently occuring bug in one pre-release, say, the one on left hand side of the chart, and you fix it in the next build.

    This leaves you with a large amount of error reports which buries the actual long-existed problems.

    Your "failure curve" failed to show the improvement between builds, and your statement on bugfix rate:

    "To date, we have fixed 80% of all the reported crashes and hangs in IE8."

    Is misrepresented in the chart, which implies 20% of the crashes are due to "infrequently appearing issues", so IE8, as opposed to the massive green bar in the chart, actually has a lot of bugs left in it.

    Thus I question the statistical usefulness of "failure curve", IMHO its existance serves as a pretty marketing term.

  2. Stu Smith says:

    I’m not trolling or MS-bashing here, but genuinely interested:

    How did the issues with IE8 on 64-bit Vista slip through the net? I’m referring to:

    1. Windows Explorer opening folders in new windows;

    2. "Open in new tab" not working;

    3. Breaking SQL Server Management Studio.

    These are pretty major (and obvious) bugs. (With the possible exception of #3).

  3. hAl says:

    Wil there be a reliability improvement patch before IE8 is set for automatic updates ?

    IE8 seems to have issues with a variety  of malware protection and security software.

    Would it not be wise to have them participate in some kind of partner testing program ?

  4. Phil says:

    Can we have a blog post about how you created reliability problems by introducing major changes between RC and RTM?

    Bad, bad, bad…  There should have been another RC.

  5. blah says:

    "To measure this, we rapidly navigate to websites and perform user actions such as opening and closing tabs and windows."

    I wish. I frequently have problems when I open tabs and try to type in the address bar of click a favorites bar link. My keystrokes are either missed, or it prompts me to open/save the .url file of my favorite. All bets are off when a tab is in the middle of its rather lengthy startup procedure.

  6. boen_robot says:

    @Stu Smith

    I have Windows Vista Ultimate x64 SP1, and I don’t experience the issues you describe.

    However, I also have Windows Server 2008 Enterprise x64 though, and the "Windows Explorer opening folders in new windows" issue does occur there… I wasn’t suspecting IE8 to be the problem, though indeed it first appeared after I isntalled it.

    @Phil

    Yep.

  7. Lloyd Sheen says:

    Right now it is weighing in at 1.5 Gigs.  Changing pages does no good it just keeps eating memory.  I use the RSS content feed capability and that eats so much more than IE7.  How anyone could release such a terible iteration of a product is beyond me.

    Slow, buggy, memory hog, … should I go on.

    Kill this IE

  8. RBJ says:

    Speaking of Reliability, i just disabled Spyware Blaster and Spybot immunization and now opening new tabs no longer stutters, it’s extremely fast as intended by IE developers. :)

    so if you folks have these programs or any other spyware programs with "immunization" settings, try to disable them and see if it helps with slow IE starting and opening new tabs.

    I hope this info helps IE developers as well.

  9. RBJ says:

    Speaking of Reliability, i just disabled Spyware Blaster and Spybot immunization and now opening new tabs no longer stutters, it’s extremely fast as intended by IE developers. :)

    so if you folks have these programs or any other spyware programs with "immunization" settings, try to disable them and see if it helps with slow IE starting and opening new tabs.

    I hope this info helps IE developers as well.

  10. kh says:

    Hi i have found som tweaks for ie8.

    If you run this two tweaks in admin "cmd" you will get ie8 to be much faster.

    1.:

    a. Choose Run As Administrator.

    b. In the Command Prompt window, enter this text and press Enter:

    regsvr32 actxprxy.dll

    c. Restart your computer.

    nr. two tweak:

    2.:

    a. Choose Run As Administrator.

    b. In the Command Prompt window, enter this text and press Enter:

    b. netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=disabled

    (if you want it back to normal again:

    "netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=normal")

  11. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @kh: Neither of the tweaks you mention is currently recommended by the IE team.

    The latter tweak disables the TCP/IP auto-scaling feature of Vista, which could result in *slower* performance rather than faster performance.  If you’ve encountered specific sites where this improves performance, please let us know so that we can investigate.

  12. kh says:

    thanks for your respons.

    I found the tweak on the internet. In practical use nr. 2 tweak speeds up the time where the site i rendering. Therefore it is much faster on all sites which have a lot of pictures and txt on..

    regards

  13. Maz says:

    I have been using IE8 since launch, and am certainly enjoying it. But there is one thing that IE8 seems to have trouble with. Animated .gifs.

    Not all, but many large (both in resolution, and or file size) and sometimes small .gif files hog my cpu and animate slowly. A good example is this: http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/image/near_20000919_large_anim.gif

    And this: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/misc/020609/westusa__June9_0015UTC_June13_0615UTC_2002.gif

    Notice how the image starts off normal, but after a few seconds it starts to get slower, your CPU usage sky rockets, and then the animation starts tearing after each frame getting slower, and repeats.

    I’ve searched through Google but I never really found a clear answer as to why this happens. Can anyone shed some light as to why this is happening, and if there is any way to fix the problem? Am I the only one having this problem?

    But other than that, IE8 is a great browser. Well done IE team.

  14. kh says:

    i have tried it in google chrome, and it is using just as much cpu power as in ie8

  15. kh says:

    Hi EricLaw [MSFT]

    You are right about it, the tweak only works on Vista machines. But it begins rendering the websites much much faster in ie8 in practical use. I found the link to article here:

    http://www.mydigitallife.info/2007/03/22/disable-tcp-auto-tuning-to-solve-slow-network-cannot-load-web-page-or-download-email-problems-in-vista/

    regards

  16. user says:

    just wanna say that ie8 sometimes loads a page zoomed for no reason (often with tables)

    the workaround is easy just refresh the page (f5)

    it’s not an important bug but it’s annoying

  17. 8675309 says:

    i found that when i used the windows advisor beta internet tweak ie7/8 worked alot better to bad the beta is over

  18. hAl says:

    @EricLaw

    Reregistering the activex dll is also recommended on ZDnet

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=754

  19. claud says:

    reregistering the dll is useless and dangerous. If you need to use this stupid tweak, this means you already have Windows compromised by a 3rd party software

  20. hAl says:

    @claud

    As it appears to be a common occurrence that people see improvements after reregistering the dll I think there is probably some kind of security software that unregisters the activex dll.

    Mayby even several.

  21. 双色球 says:

    reregistering the dll is useless and dangerous. If you need to use this stupid tweak, this means you already have Windows compromised by a 3rd party software

  22. ky says:

    I want to allow Flash contents in certain website so i used the "remove all site" in manage add-ons but the thing that i find annoying is that information bar keep appearing even when i choose to run Flash add-in the website. The flash works when i run the add-on in a website but the information bar keep showing up. Is that how it work normally? I thought that when allowing to run a flash add-on in a website it won’t show the information bar in the website anymore. I like the feature a lot and next IE version should have it more visible.

  23. ky says:

    The "Allow on all site" list is also deleted when choosing "Remove all sites".

  24. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @hAl: I’ll reiterate– Neither of the tweaks mentioned is currently recommended by the IE team.

    @ky: Can you explain a bit more about your scenario with Flash?  What is the exact option that you choose in the Information bar?  Also, when you say "The allow on all site list", what list are you referring to?

    Thx!

  25. Franco says:

    @ky

    the problem is that the information bar may appear for an flash animation hosted on an external site i.e. different from the current site you’re. You’re on microsoft.com, the information bar appears and your intention is to authorize flash for microsoft.com, but the result you’ll authorize an external advertising site such as atdmt.com.

    The problem is that the information bar don’t show the real site you’re attempting to authorize, and this is not really safe.

  26. F says:

    @ky

    the problem is that the information bar may appear for a flash animation hosted on an external site i.e. different from the current site you’re. You’re on microsoft.com, the information bar appears and your intention is to authorize flash for microsoft.com, but the result is that you’ll authorize an external advertising site such as atdmt.com.

    The problem is that the information bar doesn’t show the real site you’re attempting to authorize, and this is not really safe.

  27. Franco says:

    @ky

    the problem is that the information bar may appear for a flash animation hosted on an external site i.e. different from the current site you’re. You’re on microsoft.com, the information bar appears and your intention is to authorize flash for microsoft.com, but the result is that you’ll authorize an external advertising site such as atdmt.com.

    The problem is that the information bar doesn’t show the real site you’re attempting to authorize, and this is not really safe.

  28. Franco says:

    @ky

    the problem is that the information bar may appear for a flash animation hosted on an external site i.e. different from the current site you’re. You’re on microsoft.com, the information bar appears and your intention is to authorize flash for microsoft.com, but the result is that you’ll authorize an external advertising site such as atdmt.com.

    The problem is that the information bar doesn’t show the real site you’re attempting to authorize, and this is not really safe.

  29. Franco says:

    @ky

    the problem is that the information bar may appear for a flash animation hosted on an external site i.e. different from the current site you’re. You’re on microsoft.com, the information bar appears and your intention is to authorize flash for microsoft.com, but the result is that you’ll authorize an external advertising site such as atdmt.com.

    The problem is that the information bar doesn’t show the real site you’re attempting to authorize, and this behaviour is not really safe.

  30. ky says:

    Ericlaw

    I thought the issue was within IE but I found out later that its actually a Hotspot Shield  that is causing the information bar to appear constantly because of the Ads flash that belongs to the Hotspot shield.

    When I said "allow on all site list" I’m actually refering to the "You have approved add-on to run on the following websites" list when clicking "More Information" in Manage Add-ons. Any Possibilities of keeping the website list when allowing add-on to run in all website or a option to save the list

  31. Francis says:

    Are you aware that Outlook Web Access (at least version from Server 2003) no longer works 100% correctly under IE8? This is a problem, as IE is the only browser that OWA worked with 100% in the past.

    I’ve encountered numerous small problems, including that none of the paragraph formatting buttons in the compose new message window work under IE8; also IE8 warns about self-signed certificates for every new window that opens (not just when signing in to OWA.)

    I understand these problems are likely the fault of Exchange; still, it would be nice if you could get Exchange 2003 (as it is still supported!) patched to work correctly with IE8.

    Thanks!

  32. fmerletti says:

    Forget about IE8

    Internet Explorer 6 still rules !

  33. Anonymous says:

    I have tried several times to install IE8, but everytime, it installs, and when I try to launch it, it hangs for awhile, then I get this error:

    —————————————–

    iexplore.exe – Application error

    The instruction at "0x001a2f18" referenced memory at "0x001a2f18".  The memory could not be "written".

    Click on OK to terminate the program

    Click on CANCEL to debug the program

    —————————————–

    I am still using IE7.

  34. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Anonymous: Your best bet is to try running IE8 without add-ons, then isolate which add-on is causing the problem.  www.enhanceie.com/ie/troubleshoot.asp#crash

  35. DavidTan says:

    "IE8 uses up 90% less memory than IE7"

    That’s great news!

  36. A bug says:

    I dont know where to report this so I am posting it here.

    It seems there is some problem with IE 8. I have a bookmark on favourite bar which is a frameset. If I click on this link to open the page I get ‘webpage cannot bo found’ on both frames of the frameset page.

    This used to work fine with IE7. Can someone tell what might be wrong.

  37. Tony says:

    i haven’t experienced any real issues yet but i don’t use IE8 that much but i do hope they fix most of them. as i was going to start using it more.

  38. hAl says:

    @EricLaw,

    I know you do not recommend the tweaks but they become very noticable when large ICT news sites start giving them.

    Apperantly reregistering the dll works for some people.

    Could it be that some security software unregisters the activex dll to mitigate possible security threats ?

    And if so why could that have performance issues for IE8 whereas this is not the case with IE7 ?

    And what is the IE team going to do before IE8 goed into the update system to mitigate some of the issues found with mostly third party software which affect IE8 performance and stability ?

  39. Problems? Still? says:

    Shouldn’t all these issues have been fixed ages ago?  The majority of the world doesn’t give a damn about all the things that make IE reliable.  It is an expectation and not something to shout about.

    Microsoft’s web site tells me to go download IE8.  I would love to see my parents try re-registering a DLL when IE8 doesn’t work for them.  

    Back to Firefox then…

  40. Stu Smith says:

    @EricLaw – "Neither of the tweaks mentioned is currently recommended by the IE team." – so what DO you recommend?

    Installing IE8 broke Windows Explorer and SQL Server. Re-registering the DLL fixed them. I need those apps working to do my job. MS MVPs are also suggesting that fix. How long should 64-bit users have waited for you to recommend something?

    The silence on these 64-bit issues is deafening. It would be nice if the IE8 team even admitted the bug exists. Nicer still would be a timetable for a patch.

  41. Dan says:

    A bug, what’s the URL of the outer frame/ window?

    hAl, is this really the first time you’ve met a snake-oil salesman, promising you a solution to your problems?  This reminds me of my local computer shop, which used to sell a little "computer fixing elf" that you’d affix to the top of your computer.  Put him there, and anytime you have a problem, just reboot and it’s fixed.  Of course, the Troll did nothing, but the "cure" usually worked.

    Stu, while everyone is chatting about this re-register the DLL thing, no one here knows what you’re talking about with this "64bit issues" nonsense.  Why don’t you actually describe the problem in a useful way?

  42. jamesv says:

    I have 10 tabs opened: tab1, tab2, tab3, tab4, tab5, tab6, tab7, tab8, tab9, tab10.

    If I’m in the tab2 and I click on a link to open it in a new tab, the tab11 will appear after the tab10, but this is not comfortable because I have to move me to the end of list in order to reach the last tab.

    Why the tab11 is not opened between tab2 and tab3 ? tab1, tab2, tab11, tab3,…

    Is it possible? How?

  43. jswink1611 says:

    I have run out of places to look for this problem.

    I have three computers running XP Pro Service Pack 3.  I have installed IE 8 on two of these systems and on both the "Toolbars" have a translucent background which means I can not read the text below the icons but you can see the information on the page behind the one you are viewing.  I am not got to install IE 8 on the third computer untill this issue is resolved.  

    I have read at least a thousand MS information documents and both computers are up-to-date with Windows Updates.

    I need some help.

    Thanks,

    jswink1611

  44. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    jswink: Can you please email me a screenshot, or upload one to an image sharing service?

  45. jswink1611 says:

    Certainly Eric.  I can paste it into a Word Doc.  Can you give me an email??

    jswink

  46. Nathan says:

    Ok I’m getting really annoyed with the IE Accelerator icon popping up all over the place in my web application(s).

    I don’t want to restrict my end users from being able to search for related stuff or map things, but there are many places where this accelerator stuff just does not belong – AT ALL.

    for example, we have a column of checkboxes in a table similar to any web mail client you may have seen.  As the user scrolls down checking the boxes they inevitably start a drag action which highlights a checkbox rather than checking it.

    Then IE8 pops up an accelerator icon.

    Why would anyone want to Map/Translate/Bookmark/Search/Blog or Email the non-existent content currently selected?

    Highlighted Text? – Sure, totally justified

    Highlighted Image? – Hmmm, ok its a judgement call

    Highlighted FormField with no text content? – No. There is absolutely no use for this.

    So my question is:

    a.) How do I disable it for a given element (e.g. the TD that wraps my checkbox)

    b.) How do I disable it for a whole page?

    (e.g. there are just some pages that really have no use for this feature)

    c.) Related to (b) what if I’m a bank or someone running a very secure site? I don’t want users accidentally highlighting their SSN, bank account numbers, credit card number, etc. and accidentally searching ebay for it.

    d.) For elements rendered on screen that "represent" non-text-selectable elements, e.g. Menus, Tabs, Buttons etc. Is there a default way to stop these generating accelerator icons?

    e.g. Does IE8 support the user-select CSS property? or -msie-user-select?

    Seriously frustrated with this "feature"

    nathan

  47. Nathan says:

    Looking at the actual data sent on many accelerators the fix looks real simple.

    1.) the content sent appears to be:

    a.) "{searchTerms}" if there is no text value at all.

    b.) "+" or similar if only whitespace is selected

    c.) "some+escaped+string" when real text is selected

    Therefore, if the .innerText of the user’s selection is.

    a.) BLANK

    b.) ONLY WHITESPACE

    DO NOT SHOW THE ACCELERATOR ICON!!! There is nothing to search/blog/map/translate etc.

    More importantly there won’t be a pile of wasted HTTP Requests to sites looking for USELESS WHITESPACE or "{searchTerms}" queries.

    Currently this "accelerator feature" is looking more like an "aggravation feature".

  48. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    jswink: My address is ericlaw atmicrosoft dotcom.

  49. Jace says:

    @EricLaw

    The IE team may not be recommending re-registering this dll, but someone at Microsoft is:

    "Internet Explorer stops responding, stops working, or restarts"

    http://support.microsoft.com/gp/pc_ie_advtroubleshooting1000

    So far, using the script located at this site – which includes re-regisering the actxprxy.dll – I have been able to fix the following issues with IE 8:

    -ALL text fields on ALL web pages reversing text entered (e.g. CANADA becomes ADANAC)

    -Inability to use the file controls to check-out (among other operations) files from Sharepoint sites

    -Slow tab creation

    BTW, I think that IE 8 is the best browser on the market, hands down.

    I really appreciate the IE Team listening to feedback to improve features during the beta process.

  50. Jace says:

    BTW, the issues that were fixed using that script I reference in my comment above were all on different machines, 2 XP and 1 Vista

  51. Dan says:

    Jace, if you look at the date on that article, it’s pretty clear that it was written long before IE8 came out. If the IE team isn’t recommending you do that, you might want to take that into consideration.

    It sounds like you’re having some pretty crazy problems I’ve never heard of… the "entering text backwards" thing is pretty funny!

  52. Stu Smith says:

    @Dan – In our small office, we’ve so far installed IE8 on three Vista x64 machines. After installing, all three experience the following:

    * Windows Explorer opens all folders in new windows, rather than in the same window. (Really annoying!)

    * Right-click -> "Open in new tab" doesn’t work for many links in IE8 (a process starts, but no tab).

    * And on two machines, we’ve found that we can no longer use SQL Server Management Studio Express to connect to SQL databases.

    If you think it’s limited to our office, here’s a set of links from an MVP:

    http://msmvps.com/blogs/martinpoon/archive/tags/Internet+Explorer/default.aspx

    A quick Google search for ‘IE8 64-bit "open in new window"’ reveals many people with the same issues.

    Perhaps we do share some odd configuration on our machines. But our first experiences of IE8 were "Wow, it’s seriously broken our machines. How did this get past testing?"

  53. Stu Smith says:

    @Dan – In our small office, we’ve so far installed IE8 on three Vista x64 machines. After installing, all three experience the following:

    * Windows Explorer opens all folders in new windows, rather than in the same window. (Really annoying!)

    * Right-click -> "Open in new tab" doesn’t work for many links in IE8 (a process starts, but no tab).

    * And on two machines, we’ve found that we can no longer use SQL Server Management Studio Express to connect to SQL databases.

    If you think it’s limited to our office, here’s a set of links from an MVP:

    http://msmvps.com/blogs/martinpoon/archive/tags/Internet+Explorer/default.aspx

    A quick Google search for ‘IE8 64-bit "open in new window"’ reveals many people with the same issues.

    Perhaps we do share some odd configuration on our machines. But our first experiences of IE8 were "Wow, it’s seriously broken our machines. How did this get past testing?"

  54. Olivier says:

    @Jace : please tell me if your CANADA <-> ADANAC is really solved : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsMFyo8DWs4&flip=1 :-)

  55. fr says:

    @Stu – I’ve been running IE8 on my Vista x64 machine since RC1 with none of the problems you mention.  Not sure what the difference could be to cause these issues.

  56. IE8 breaks the ATL COM wizard in Visual Studio 2005 with a scripting error.

  57. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Viktor: Did you check out http://blogs.msdn.com/vcblog/archive/2009/03/28/some-vs2005-and-vs2008-wizards-pop-up-script-error.aspx?

    @Stu: I’ve been running IE8 on my x64 machines since Beta-1 and haven’t seen any of these issues.  Can you describe what other software and utilities are common across your machines?

  58. Klimax says:

    I wonder,could anybody with such problems run Process monitor?There might be recorded access to broken(for any reason) link to activex dll.

    Or list ANY and ALL installed apps,since it sounds like install went wrong caused by 3rd party or 3rd party damaging record.(So far three computers updated,no problems apart from Spybot spotted)

  59. IE8 User says:

    IE8 is fantastic.  Kudos to the team.

  60. Sayied says:

    I noticed a strange probelm in the new about:Tabs page.

    I no longer see the recently visited pages and it is giving me this error:

    "Webpage error details

    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 5.1; Trident/4.0; Hewlett-Packard; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.0.04506.648; .NET CLR 3.5.21022; .NET CLR 3.0.4506.2152; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; FDM; Hewlett-Packard)

    Timestamp: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 02:14:34 UTC

    Message: Element not found.

    Line: 144

    Char: 1

    Code: 0

    URI: res://ieframe.dll/tabswelcome.htm"

    Can anyone shed some light on this weird issue?

  61. rep says:

    I find it hilarious that you have a bar chart for failures. Tracking failures, you know the software sucks… trash it.

  62. Dan says:

    rep, you must have an odd sense of humor.  The idea that some software vendor /isn’t/ tracking crashes is a scary one. The fact that Microsoft does should not be surprising in any way.

    Sayied, line 144 of that file calls window.external.BuildNewTabPage().  If that function is missing, it suggests your IE8 install might be corrupted.  Have you had any other problems with IE?  Have you followed any troubleshooting steps suggested by others?

  63. Dan says:

    Sayied, you might also want to try running in No-Addons mode to see if that makes the problem go away.  It’s possible that one of your addons (e.g. "FDM"?) is causing the problem by taking over the window.external object.

  64. James Prior says:

    Running IE8 on XP in compatibility mode to view a website with an animated gif results in slow animation, high cpu spike (single thread max cpu usage) and on my laptop, eventually overheating the GPU. Nice. Same page in FF3 runs very low CPU and no noticeable GPU temp increase.

    I wonder how this type of issue makes it to a final product. Rapid release schedule? Internal decision to ‘encourage’ the adoption of silverlight for web graphics? 😀

  65. Paul says:

    James>> When you don’t bother to provide a url for such a simple scenario, you clearly identify yourself as a troll.  

    I wonder why that’s obvious to everyone but you?

  66. Stu Smith says:

    @Eric – I’ve sent an NFO file through to you, with a couple more to follow over the next few days. Hopefully they will help you triangulate in on this issue. If the email doesn’t get through, let me know and I’ll arrange an alternate method of delivery.

  67. pbnec says:

    where can the multilingual user interface pack of windows internet explorer 8 be download?

  68. Olivier says:

    @pbnec : I hope we’ll get the MUI version soon. Here’s the answer I got some weeks ago :

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2009/03/19/internet-explorer-8-final-available-now.aspx#9502687

  69. John says:

    What IE8 needs is a decent help file. What’s included is utterly useless. Example: ADVANCED tab in Internet options: what does each item do? There are TONS of options. Clicking the help icon, I thought, was supposed to show context-sensitive help. Instead, it opens the help file and shows this helpful bit: "The Advanced tab contains settings for various Internet Explorer options, organized by category." DUH! How hard can it be? Why bother putting in anything at all??

  70. John says:

    What IE8 needs is a decent help file. What’s included is utterly useless. Example: ADVANCED tab in Internet options: what does each item do? There are TONS of options. Clicking the help icon, I thought, was supposed to show context-sensitive help. Instead, it opens the help file and shows this helpful bit: ‘The Advanced tab contains settings for various Internet Explorer options, organized by category.’ DUH! How hard can it be? Why bother putting in anything at all??

  71. hAl says:

    It seems Sophos has some issues with IE8 as well:

    A user on the tweakers.net forum reported this answer from Sophos on his inquiries:

    "Sophos Client Firewall: Internet Explorer 8 is reported as a hidden process

    Issue

    When you open Internet Explorer 8, Sophos Client Firewall reports that it is a hidden process launched by Internet Explorer 8.

    Sophos product and version

    Sophos Client Firewall 1.5.4

    Operating system

    All Supported Platforms

    What to do

    Add Internet Explorer 8 to the list of allowed hidden processes.

    This issue may be the a result of Internet Explorer 8 running each tab as a separate process. This is a known defect which will be fixed in a future release of Sophos Client Firewall.

    If you need more information or guidance, then please contact technical support"

  72. Olivier says:

    I’ve just checked the help file and… there’s probably a problem with the IE8 setup.

    Before IE8, I had IE7 (MUI version, since it’s on a WinXP MUI). The OS is configured for French.

    Now, I’ve IE8 English version, and when I check the help file I have… the IE7 help file, in French.

    If it can help, the help file opened is : "C:WINDOWSHelpmui40ciexplore.chm"

    I’ll check tonight, but I’m sure at home I’ve the IE8 help file in French (OS : WinXP French, IE8 French).

  73. jeff davis says:

    @nathan – good question! Just how does one get rid of Accelerators when you don’t want them? and why do they show up so many times when they are not needed or invalid?

    I noticed that you can select HUGE! amounts of content and the accelerator still shows up even though it won’t search on such a huge blob of text/content.

    Seems like Accelerators didn’t go through much/any real-life QA test cycles before being released which is sad because it could have been a really good feature but now it is just going to be annoying.

  74. Dan says:

    jeff, clearly you’re new here or don’t know much about IE8.  The feature you’re slamming has been in the public product for over a year, including 3 public pre-release versions.

    If you (the user) wants to turn off Accelerators altogether, use the option in Tools / Internet Options / Advanced.

    As for the idea that websites should be able to turn this off– why?  I think the user should be in control of their browser.  We all know what websites will do if they can prevent the use of services provided by others– they’ll do so!  They’ll turn off Accelerators and provide their own (crappy) equivalents, forcing the user to use only that company’s services.  That would be lame.

    hAl, Sounds like Sophos needs an update to deal with the real world.  TONS of legitimate programs use multiple processes for legitimate reasons.  Of course, what do you expect?  Such programs are DELIBERATELY noisy, otherwise users won’t pay for them!  Those programs must convince the user that they’re not safe without them, which is why they freak out about cookies and things like this…

  75. Net Developer says:

    Thank you so much for this excellent browser!

  76. Sayied says:

    @Dan:

    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Running without add-ons doesn’t solve the problem and this is the only issue I have with IE8.

    I will try re-installing IE8 to see if that fixes the issue.

  77. pbnec says:

    @Olivier: How about the multilingual user interface pack of internet explorer 8 for windows server 2003?

  78. FlowerPower says:

    On March 19, 2009 I have installed the final version of IE8 on my Windows XP Professional SP3 (Dell Inspiron 6400 laptop). Please note also that the SP 3 was installed AFTER I previously installed IE7 (due to the fact that, chronologically, Microsoft has first released the IE7 and then the SP3).  Anyway there was no noticeable difference in terms of browsing speed and moreover IE8 seemed to me too sophisticated. So I decided to uninstall it. THIS was the START of my problem. After I uninstalled IE8 the system reverted to an IE7 that was totally non-functional (hang-up / freezing-up a few seconds after it opened the home page of my browser – http://www.microsoft.com).

    I tried everything: uninstalling and reinstalling IE7, to uninstalling and reinstalling SP3 (both in normal and safe mode) even under the guidance of a representative of Microsoft support representative in Romania to whom I have granted remote access to my laptop. The same negative result was obtained when, as suggested by the same Romanian Microsoft Support representative I uninstalled the Norton Internet Security 2009 and the Spybot Search and Destroy and I even performed a repair install of my Windows XP professional. Everything was in vain tough.

    I should mentione that currently I am able to browse the Internet using IE6 with SP3 and all related Microsoft updates installed.

    After doing and extensive research on the net among other things I found out this IEBlog and this  article on “IE and Windows XP Service Pack 3 ” blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2008/05/05/ie-and-xpsp3.aspx . After reading this article I am wondering whether IE8 has installed also a file that blocks the normal reverting to a functional IE7, after uninstalling IE8. I am wondering this due to the fact that when reinstalling IE8 this is working fine.

    Thanks in advance for your suggestions/support.

  79. kh says:

    ie8 is different from ie7 in sound mixer/manager in vista in the bottom of the right corner. There are in ie8 no names for each tabs og webpage. In ie8 it says "internet explorer". So if you want to turn off sound for a specific webpage you have open it is pretty difficult.

    Please fix ie8 so names in sound mixer/manager in windows vista are visible so you can tell them apart.

    many thanks

  80. kh says:

    ie8 is different from ie7 in sound mixer/manager in vista in the bottom of the right corner. There are in ie8 no names for each tabs og webpage. In ie8 it says "internet explorer". So if you want to turn off sound for a specific webpage you have open it is pretty difficult.

    Please fix ie8 so names in sound mixer/manager in windows vista are visible so you can tell them apart.

    many thanks

  81. Using IE8? Issues ? Something broken? Truth is, on Vista I stopped using IE8 in the middle of the beta

  82. Joe Chan says:

    Hi,

    I’ve been using IE 8 (8.0.6001.18702).  My biggest problem seems to be that whenever I go to a site that pops up a new window when you click on a link, I’ll get an error msg and if I follow it as help, it tells me that it’s a DEP error.

  83. Mark Adams says:

    Hi, i’m running into some serious problems with the latest version of IE8 on Windows XP Pro.  Before getting to that though i’d like to comment that the RAM usage from multiple tabs is truly horrendous compared to IE7.  In IE8, I currently have 10 tabs open and it is using 700mb of RAM. 700/10 = 70mb per tab.  Previously in IE7, I would sometimes have 40-50 tabs open with only 300mb of RAM used. 300/50 = 6mb per tab.  A 12x inrease in the RAM usage by a tab seems unacceptable to me for an upgraded IE, even if it does prevent a crash from claiming all tabs as victim.

  84. Mark Adams says:

    With that said, the issue i’m running into seems to be a sort of memory leak.  It was a problem I had in IE7 and unfortunately still seems to be a problem in IE8, only magnified.  I tend to open a lot of forum posts in new tabs to read them, and i’ve noticed that when I close these newly opened tabs, a big chunk of the RAM they were using is not restored.  

    As an example, I just opened 4 new tabs by clicking links on a forum, and I then promptly closed them all.  My available RAM before opening the tabs was 384MB.  After closing the tabs, it is 356MB.  The RAM is gradually eaten away during the day like this until it gets below 100MB.  I can usually tell when this occurs as the computer gets sluggish.  If I then close the IE window with the tabs in it and then reopen them all as they were before (now only possible to do now with End Task in IE8 and then restore), the available RAM will jump back to 400MB.

  85. kh says:

    ie8 is different from ie7 in sound mixer/manager in vista in the bottom of the right corner. There are in ie8 no names for each tabs og webpage. In ie8 it says "internet explorer". So if you want to turn off sound for a specific webpage you have open it is pretty difficult.

    Please fix ie8 so names in sound mixer/manager in windows vista are visible so you can tell them apart.

    many thanks

  86. A bug says:

    @Dan (posted on 6th April)

    I dontt know if I am late to reply but here is the information..

    This frameset in hosted on our intranet server. We access by IP and the two frame as relative URLs.

    I spoke to our IT guy and he said this frameset is export from Visio 2003.

    I do not have any more information about this issue.

    Thanks.

  87. I have the following problem when running IE8 on Vista. I have a parent window that opens a new window (window.open) and the new window is automatically minimized.  If we try to do a window.focus() on the new window, it does not make it the active window.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  88. M Derrick Glass says:

    This falls in the realm of suggestion. The Automatic Crash Recovery feature is exceptionally nice.

    I wonder why, though, you have to actually crash IE8 to get its functionality? I regularly have a number of IE windows open, each with sets of tabs for projects I’m working on. I’d like to preserve the browsing history etc. on each, just like ACR.

    But the only way I’ve discovered to do it is to kill IE8 in Task manager; and that only lets me save one set. When you start the next browse, it asks if you want to recover the last "session" but if you go to create a "session" it only opens up a single new browser instance. You can get the last tab set, but again, only from the "last" instance closed.

  89. M Derrick Glass says:

    Quick followup – I just saw Mark Adams April 12 post that brings up the subject I addressed. But I’d also like to mention that the issue of excessive memory consumption is one of the reasons I have to kill IE8 – do that and then session-recover the browser windows will bring back a ton of memory.

  90. Anonymous says:

    As posted above:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2009/04/02/fixing-reliability-issues-in-ie8.aspx#9532632

    I am still getting the same issue.  I have IE8 installed still, but am using Firefox, which I have been for years.  But I’d like to fix IE8.

    After installing IE8 and doing this several times, to attempt to fix the problem, it still exists.

    When I start IE8 normal, or without any addons, I get the following error:

    The instruction at "XXXXXXX" referenced memory at "XXXXX".  The memory could not be "written".

    Click on OK to terminate the program

    Click on CANCEL to debug the program

    In the event viewer, it shows:

    Faulting application iexplore.exe, version 8.0.6001.18702, faulting module unknown, version 0.0.0.0, fault address 0x001ba360.

  91. Jason says:

    IE8 final keeps crashing when I try to visit websites that are using ZEDO code (crashes happen only if I have http://www.zedo.com, *.zedo.com in restricted sites zone). How could I solve?