IE Automatic Component Activation (Changes to IE ActiveX Update)


Back in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded controls used on some webpages. Some sites required users to “click to activate” before they could interact with the control. Microsoft has now licensed the technologies from Eolas, removing  the “click to activate” requirement in Internet Explorer. Because of this, we’re removing the “click to activate” behavior from Internet Explorer!

It’s important (and cool) to note that this change will require no modifications to existing webpages, and no new actions for developers creating new pages. We are simply reverting to the old behavior. Once Internet Explorer is updated, all pages that currently require “click to activate” will no longer require the control to be activated. They’ll just work.  

 

Before April 2006

After April 2006 IE Active X update

After April 2008 Removal

Controls Injected Via JavaScript

No “Click to Activate”

No “Click To Activate”

No “Click To Activate”

Controls loaded Direct In HTML (<object>, <embed>, <applet>)

No “Click to Activate”

“Click To Activate” Required

No “Click To Activate”

So you’re probably wondering when we are going to release this update? The first chance will be with an optional preview release, called the Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation Preview, available in December 2007 via the Microsoft Download Center. Additionally this change will be made part of the next pre-release versions of Windows Vista SP1 and Windows XP SP3. After giving people enough time to prepare for this change, we’ll roll this behavior into the IE Cumulative Update in April 2008, and all customers who install the update will get the change.

If you have a custom application using WebOC or MSHTML, there may be some changes that affect your application. For example:

  • If your application uses the DOCHOSTUI flag to opt-in to the current “Click To Activate” behavior, that behavior will continue to be respected and your application will require “Click To Activate”
  • If you application uses the registry key FEATURE_ENABLE_ACTIVEX_INACTIVATE_MODE to opt-in to the current “Click To Activate” behavior, this registry key will no long be respected. If you wish to continue to use the “Click to Activate” behavior, please use the DOCHOSTUI flag.

In the coming weeks, we’ll be updating the MSDN article with descriptions of the new behavior. Keep an eye out here for when the preview goes live. 

Thanks,

PEte LePage
Senior Product Manager

Comments (170)

  1. rafaelbozzetti says:

    Pelo amor de Deus, descontinuem este navegador!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. Mark Sowul says:

    About time.  Why didn’t MS just license this from Eolas after they lost the case?  The money it must have cost to make and support (and revert) this change must have been comparable to whatever (idiotic) licensing they wanted to charge.

  3. Xepol says:

    Please don’t make us wait until April 2008… that click to activate is seriously annoying.  The sooner you could change IE back, the better.

    I don’t know why they were granted a patent, nor why the patent was allowed to stand on something so BLOODY OBVIOUS (Rarely is it obvious to make things work differently rather than exactly the same…)  But here we are, none the less.  

    Sadly, suing Microsoft seems to be an entire industry all unto itself.  Even sader, it is usually for stuff that no other company would ever, ever get sued for.

  4. Great news at the IEBlog : Back in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded

  5. Chris says:

    Forgive my ignorance, but why the long wait for a reversion to previous usability? How come it can’t be apart of next Tuesdays release?

  6. Simon Jia says:

    Really great news. Finally the usability issue is improved or at least back to what it was before on IE6.

  7. One of the most annoying developments over recent years has been the &quot;Click here to active this

  8. E says:

    Yay! No more annoying workarounds.

  9. The Internet Explorer team is going to be offering a slightly less annoying version of the ActiveX behavior

  10. BradC says:

    Yeah!! Woohooo!!

    You can’t imagine how annoying this has been for the past 1.5 yrs.

    REALLY, REALLY annoying.

    The sooner you roll this out, the better! (Now waiting till DEC will seem like a million years!)

  11. Bink.nu says:

    Following its August settlement of a long-standing patent dispute with Eolas , Microsoft is readying

  12. You’ve been kicked (a good thing) – Trackback from DotNetKicks.com

  13. Doug K. says:

    About time!  I hated click to activate and have been delaying using it on our control..now we don’t have to. Excellent!!

    DK

  14. Metagg says:

    Find out what Social News Sites are discussing this post over at metagg.com

  15. Nicolas says:

    I find it totally retarded that you did such an anti-user-friendly change for purely legal reasons; even more since it can be worked around by the website owner using JS (how come *that* isn’t a legal problem too?)

  16. Worst name ever: Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation Preview says:

    Worst name ever:

    "Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation Preview" – yeah, can’t wait to download that one!

  17. clarence says:

    "we’ll roll this behavior into the IE Cumulative Update in April 2008"

    So, if I read this correctly (and sorry for doing so, it is not like there is any info on this blog about IE8), it means that IE8 as a beta, is at least as far away as Q2,2008!

    So much for a Christmas present this year for developers dying to hear news on an IE8 release.

  18. If you&#39;ve used Internet Explorer in the past ~1.5 years, you&#39;ve know doubt been inconvenienced

  19. Brian says:

    > "Microsoft has now licensed the

    > technologies from Eolas"

    Ridiculous.

    By licensing this "technology", you are admitting that Eolas invented it and that it belongs to them. Just leave it as it is. Eolas was wrong in the first place, and now you are rewarding them for it.

    Has anyone patented walking or breathing yet? There must be a market for that.

  20. Well, We have another check to make inside cross-site JS libraries and We’ll need them for many time … thank You IE team, You did a great choice last 2006 year!

  21. Brutus says:

    "Why didn’t MS just license this from Eolas after they lost the case?  The money it must have cost to make and support (and revert) this change must have been comparable to whatever (idiotic) licensing they wanted to charge."

    ———————————————–

    At the time Eolas said they would never license this to MS because they wanted to use the patent to cripple IE so that users would move to other browsers.  Eolas said they did this "because MS = teh evil!"  That’s why they never went after any other browsers even though all the other browsers "infringe" on their "patent" in the exact same way that IE supposedly does.

    IMO, the patent was BS, and the fact that the Javascript workaround circumvented it shows that the patent brought nothing new to the table.  That and the fact that the Patent Office reversed its stance on the patent multiple times (sometimes upholding it, sometimes striking it down, and even sometimes awarding a patent on the same stuff to Microsoft).  This case should be Exhibit A for Patent Reform.

  22. IE fixing Click to Activate issue!

  23. kLL says:

    Opera Software has implemented "Click to activate" as well.

    I doubt think they’d pay Eolas’ any money, especially for a thing as distasteful as software patent.

  24. "Microsoft has now licensed the technologies from Eolas, removing  the “click to activate” requirement in Internet Explorer."

    I’m confused, how to you have to have a license to remove something? What (in plain English) is the specific action that Eolas is trying to patent? The installation of a plugin, a warning about installing a plugin, etc?

  25. Faramond says:

    Please add an option to continue this behavior (and extend it to ALL controls, including those injected via JavaScript.)

    Third-party controls are a major cause of browser slowdowns and crashes; there’s nothing like opening a new tab and having a control you did not want activated bring the system to a standstill or the browser down completely.

    I would suggest adding a "prompt every time" setting in addition to the "enable" and "disable" settings in the manage add-ons dialog box. (This would be a great way, e.g., to screen out unnecessary Flash advertisements yet be able to use Flash when necessary.)

  26. Great!  Now can you also make it so IE doesn’t consume 800MB of memory after forty minutes?

  27. n-blue says:

    Great, but any information about IE8. Please don’t keep us waiting too long.

  28. Blogs says:

    you may remember the result of EOLAS litigation a while back. yes, the one resulting in what some feel

  29. Qidian says:

    IE 7.0 dosen`t easy to use at all,for web develpor

  30. Question Man says:

    Which is the latest IE version that doesn’t implement the "Click to Activate" behavior?

  31. Good News for Flash Developers

  32. Le blog de l’équipe d’Internet Explorer vient d’annoncer un nouveau changement à venir du comportement

  33. Bit-cycling says:

    Great news from the IE Blog : Back in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded

  34. Great news from the IE Blog : Back in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded

  35. Le blog de l’équipe d’Internet Explorer vient d’annoncer un nouveau changement à venir du comportement

  36. iFX says:

    No More Click To Activate In Internet Explorer

  37. BrianM says:

    Another good reason why the patent system needs to be done away with. Patents kill people by denying drugs etc and frustration and cost to others (this) – There has to be a better way to reward innovation (and what innovation is truly unique,everything builds on something else!). Eloas is certainly a patent too far – its just obvious…..

  38. Happy to see the end of this in sight, although april is a long way off!

    I will still be using swfObject to embed my flash, only becoause of the nicer functions built into it.

  39. Han Sanghun says:

    Wow! This is a great news. Thanks.

  40. Si je vous parle du procès Microsoft contre Eolas, ça ne vous dira peut-être rien. Mais se je vous parle

  41. 13BIT.com.ar says:

    No more "Click to activate this control"

  42. luca says:

    I agree with Faramond. I prefer a click to activate or an option

  43. luca says:

    No “Click To Activate” = welcome banners and unwanted code executed

  44. Wow, no more swfObject that is great!!!

    I would really advise that you provide setting to disable/enable this feature.  I happen to personally like that I can control what content runs when I view page; however, my clients really do not like it when their viewers have to click to make the navigation or other design elements work.

  45. wilson says:

    What is this "Click to Activate" thing that everyone is all in a flurry over?

    I have never seen this once, in any browser I use!

    Firefox, Opera, Netscape, or Safari for Windows.

    Is this another one of those Proprietary IE Int_RA_net things?

    I don’t get it?

  46. In a recent posting on the IEBlog the IE product Manager has outlined that the &quot;click to activate&quot;

  47. deef says:

    there goes my excuse for saying "we should make this in silverlight instead of flash" 🙂

    anyway: good news… hope it gets deployed soon

  48. AtulMarathe says:

    As many have mentioned, won’t it be a cause to slow browsing and/or security risks? I hope you’ll have an option to keep the ‘click-to-activate’ behavior…

  49. Dave Massy says:

    AtulMarathe,

    This doesn’t make any difference to browsing speed or security. The "Click to Activate" thing does NOT prevent a control from running. "Click to Activate" only prevents a user from interacting with the control until they have clicked on it. This was never and should never be seen as a security enhancement.

    Use the "Manage Add-ons" option under tools if you want to prevent controls from actually running.

    -Dave

  50. Michael says:

    Thank god!!

    I hate "Click here to activate" soooo much!

    thank you Microsoft for removing it.

  51. This is good news, although I do not see any contribution of Eolas Inc. other than patent trolling or perhaps we now have another good example for arguing against software patents.

    @IE team

    Why waiting so long for the update and why do you not remove the activation entirely?

  52. insane says:

    but in this way you have a lot of unwanted flash animations using your CPU. This is insane!

  53. Greg says:

    Allowing ActiveX to silently run along with the 8mb ie temp files cache minimum is lowering IE’s security.  Please keep the ‘prompt on ActiveX run’ as well as let us disable IE’s local disk cache (no temp files) and also ‘clear all IE data on IE close’.  Many secure environments, banks and financial firms, have to block un-approved software (i.e, ActiveX controls) and/or remove temporary data for auditing compliance from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  Succinctly, allowing an application to install itself with approval from the computer owner is a bad practice.  A software company/writer relying on an undocumented workaround to circumvent this need for customer approval is also a bad practice since the software company/writer is displaying that they are not concrened with security of their application as well as the security of the end user’s machine.

  54. Dave Massy says:

    insane,

    Flash runs anyway. If you want to stop flash from using CPU cycles then disable it or set it to prompt in the Magae add-ons option of IE.

    "Click to activate" does not stop a control such as flash from running when the page is loaded. The functionality was nothing to do with stopping controls from running. It was simply a silly workaround to an even sillier patent.

    -Dave

  55. Maketuning says:

    This doesn’t happens to Firefox ^^

  56. Fred says:

    @Maketuning: Guess who Eolas will sue next?  Google will probably pay up since they pretty much own Firefox anyway.

  57. CableGuy says:

    On one side this is great news, on the other side ActiveX is still a security problem.

  58. Last year, Microsoft was forced to add one of the worst features ever to IE because of the Eolas patent

  59. JIRA: Moodle says:

    I just want to note that Microsoft announced on November 8th that they will be removing the "click to activate" in April 2008 as a cumulative update and as an optional update in December 2007 Source: http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2007/11/08/ie-aut..

  60. vanilla says:

    Please give us the option to keep "Click to Activate". I heard about this change a few weeks ago and was dismayed that Microsoft is being forced to do this. I know the majority want this default behavior removed, but I very much wish to keep it.

  61. @vanilla

    Make sure you read the entire post:

    > If your application uses the DOCHOSTUI flag to opt-in to the current “Click To Activate” behavior, that behavior will continue to be respected and your application will require “Click To Activate”

  62. Adam says:

    What a costly change for Microsoft and for all the web developers.  And wasted time and effort to all the users who had to click to activate anything on a web page.  All we did was move a big pile of rocks from one place to another and then back again.

  63. Mio says:

    What about adapting the plugin system of Mozilla?

  64. Paraesthesia says:

    IE Component Activation Removal

  65. @insane

    If you do not want Flash then either block it with an add-on such as Quero or disable the Flash plug-in in the first place.

  66. Simon Jia says:

    Do we know why this fix has to be bundled with the SP till April next year? It’s a much needed urgent fix, can’t we just release it through weekly updates?

  67. luc says:

    I would like an option in order to block some activex installation requests. It’s very annoyng when I go on a site and I see a yellow bar request to install an activex. Please add an option to deny it FOREVER.

  68. Ed says:

    Who cares? Has no-one heard of SWFObject?

  69. Great news but why the long wait to revert to the previous usability?

  70. Teamzille.de says:

    Seit einigen Jahren muss man im Internet Explorer und auch in einigen anderen Browsern erst auf einen Flashfilm klicken, bevor man darin enthaltene Elemente benutzen kann. Begr�ndet ist dies in einer Patentklage von Eolas Technology, den Entwicklern eine

  71. Why bother?  At this point, anyone who hasn’t switched to the JavaScript method of emdedding object is a pretty shoddy developer, or just doesn’t care about his users exerience.  I can’t believe that Microsoft would actually pay Eolas for such a stupid patent.  This is why the patent laws are so screwed up.

  72. HEY MICROSOFT!! TRY THIS!

    class ca.nectere.utils.ClassUtils{

      //create a movieClip and associate a class with it

      static public function CreateWithClass( classRef:Function,

    target:MovieClip, name:String, depth:Number, params:Object ){

          var mc:MovieClip=target.createEmptyMovieClip(name,depth);

          mc.__proto__ = classRef.prototype;

          if (params != null) for (var i in params) mc[i]=params[i];

          classRef.apply(mc);

          return mc;

      }

      //attach a movieClip from the library and associate a class with it

      static public function AttachWithClass( classRef:Function,

    target:MovieClip, id:String, name:String, depth:Number, params:Object ){

          var mc:MovieClip = target.attachMovie(id, name, depth, params);

          mc.__proto__ = classRef.prototype;

          classRef.apply(mc);

          return mc;

      }

      //link a class with an existing movieClip, use for _root / timeline

    association

      static public function LinkWithClass( classRef:Function,

    target:MovieClip ){

          var mc:MovieClip = target;

          mc.__proto__ = classRef.prototype;

          classRef.apply(mc);

          return target;

      }

    }

  73. Nicolas says:

    I hate all the stupid websites that use Javascript to add Flash, all because of Microsoft adding this retarded "click to activate" crap. I get a message saying I don’t have flash when actually what I don’t have enabled is JS.

  74. Geek Life says:

    Woo hooo! 🙂 "Back in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded controls used on some webpages. Some sites required users to “click to activate” before they could interact with the control. Microsoft has now…

  75. Thanks for all the answers, the blog is so inclusive. >__>

  76. Dmitri says:

    The very beginning on the article states "Some sites required users to “click to activate” before they could interact with the control."

    Would not it be more correct to says that "IE required users to "click to activate" controls for _some_ sites"?

  77. WPKF says:

    Agree with Mark Sowul. It was just a tiny amount of cash for Mircosoft. Microsoft should have licensed this patent earlier, even though this patent is stupid. That would have saved efforts of developers around the global.

  78. IE8 says:

    @Dmitri, nice observation. It’s funny how they’ve worded it like that.

  79. Ssson says:

    So is the update that is planed for April 08 just only for IE7? How about IE6?

  80. Microsoft si accorda con Eolas: gli Activex torneranno ad attivarsi automaticamente su Internet Explorer

  81. Malingo says:

    I like it that the behavior will go back to the old way, but what I REALLY don’t like about this:

    That Eola got money out of it.

    I think MS should rather have left the behavior as is and don’t give them any money at all.

  82. Attila says:

    It didn’t really bother me. There is a really easy workaround for this "click to activate".

    You should better give better update the browser to more W3C standard compliant.

    That is a bit more aching, I think.

    Still it is a start.

  83. Watashi says:

    Does this mean I won’t need to add the javascripts to load Flash and avoid that awfull click?

  84. Shaun says:

    Questions from an exasperated developer:

    Will you apologize to developers for this shambles of a stumbling block that we’ve had to work around for the past year and a half? (and will have to continue to do so for another two years max while the update filters onto people’s systems).

    And will you please stop acting like you’re the victim of Eolas. With so many development resources available I don’t believe there wasn’t a way you could have worked around it. No other browser ever had to do this.

    Also, is this going to be for IE6 too? I tried to avoid getting the original update in the first place – but Microsoft snuck it onto the system somehow and now even IE6 is demanding I "Click to Activate".

  85. (w) says:

    Well, it seems to be the most expensive removal of one click in a whole browser history, isn’t it? The settlement was (afaik) about 500 megs of bucks… that’s a huge lunch! 😉

    For all who say that this patent is stupid: I’ll tell you something: The whole patent system is stupid and I think that it would be better to live even without THIS system than with such a crap, what US patent system is (I personaly think that the world can easily, particulary MORE easily live without any patents at all).

    OK, for those who cannot live without patents: you have to deal with those situations that you must pay megs of bucks for such primitive things.

  86. Steve says:

    "And will you please stop acting like you’re the victim of Eolas. With so many development resources available I don’t believe there wasn’t a way you could have worked around it."

    How exactly? No amount of development resource can find a way around such a blatent patent.

    "No other browser ever had to do this."

    I believe Opera has done it too. Firefox and other open source ones have got away with it because Eolas have chosen not to uphold it for them.

  87. celshader says:

    Good.

    About time.

    This issue hurt Flash developers…..A LOT!!!

  88. Shadoz says:

    This is very interesting stuff. i wish developer like myself would have a chance to test this earlier.

  89. Neal G says:

    Thanks IE! That whole issue almost made me switch to firefox but I remain a microsoft fanboy still. Keep up the good work.

  90. iTnews reports that Microsoft will remove a &#39;feature&#39; (yes, feature) from IE. The supposed feature

  91. TENGO PROBLEMA PARA DESCARGAR ARCHIVOS FORMATO QUICKTIME. EXPLORADOR DICE "INTERNET EXPLORER NO PUEDE DESCARGAR. INTERFAZ NO DISPONIBLE.

    FAVOR INDICAR SOLUCION.-

  92. upset says:

    I’m amazed that only 2 or 3 people have pointed out how bad this is. Acknowledge Eolas’ ridiculous patent? I was ready for a class action lawsuit against Eolas, myself. The patent is fraudulent, and the US court system failed. By licensing the patent it seals the coffin on any future cases.

    Microsoft may be evil, but Eolas’ patent is worse. I will be diligently looking for a patent to use against them.

  93. jerfdorv says:

    Eolas doesn’t have a product.  Just patents.

  94. macbirdie says:

    If there’s no patent for filing idiotic patents, we still might have a chance against Eolas.

  95. Hooooray, great news 🙂 Maybe you remember when Microsoft lost his case with Eolas, we were force to

  96. Topaz says:

    Brutus wrote:

    "Why didn’t MS just license this from Eolas after they lost the case?  The money it must have cost to make and support (and revert) this change must have been comparable to whatever (idiotic) licensing they wanted to charge."

    ———————————————–

    At the time Eolas said they would never license this to MS because they wanted to use the patent to cripple IE so that users would move to other browsers.  Eolas said they did this "because MS = teh evil!"  That’s why they never went after any other browsers even though all the other browsers "infringe" on their "patent" in the exact same way that IE supposedly does.

    IMO, the patent was BS, and the fact that the Javascript workaround circumvented it shows that the patent brought nothing new to the table.  That and the fact that the Patent Office reversed its stance on the patent multiple times (sometimes upholding it, sometimes striking it down, and even sometimes awarding a patent on the same stuff to Microsoft).  This case should be Exhibit A for Patent Reform.

    ———————————————–

    Topaz writes:

    Then why did Microsoft agree to settle with EOLAS after the appeals court ruled in Microsoft’s favor and ordered a new trial? If Microsoft was so certain the patent was BS, why didn’t they go forward with a new trial?

    What’s despicable is that Microsoft used people who use IE and forced them to "click to activate" as a means of getting around the whole EOLAS mess and not accepting responsibility. The real BS is Microsoft using people as a pawn to patch their legal affairs.

    And worse is the delay (April 2008) in releasing the patch that will get rid of the "click to activate" nonsense. Microsoft needs to release it TODAY, not five months from now.

    Unbelievable!

  97. Anphanax says:

    "What’s despicable is that Microsoft used people who use IE and forced them to "click to activate" as a means of getting around the whole EOLAS mess and not accepting responsibility."

    ROFL. Yeah, it’s "despicable" they worked around a garbage patent. It’s a shame it was ever accepted in the first place. It seems "despicable" to me that they did not go after other browser makers.

  98. Webado says:

    Well, about time.

    But by now hordes of people have worked on making scripts to go around that annoyance.

    Scripts like UFO, SWFObject, WMPObject.

    Those scripts have now taken on a life of their own, having been pushed to great heights and taken way beyond the merely busy work which was the elimination of the "click to activate this control" mess.

  99. Matt says:

    It’s about time MS did something about this.I mean come on how long can it take to add an update like this if there is a lot of people working on the same thing?

    Shoot why take so long to get back to the No Click to Activate Control feature that should have never been removed to begin with?

    At least you are making things right again at long last.Also please be sure that this No Click to Activate Control stays forever.So many of us like it the way it was with the No Click to Activate.

    I have Friends online who hate this Click to Activate control too.Here is a list of effected things that had workarounds because of the change that should never have been made to begin with.You can see these just below:

    Online Windows Media Player Movies

    Online Quicktime Media Player Movies

    Online Shockwave Media Player Movies

    Other Online Media Player Movies

    Online Banners with links back to websites who made them.

    Embeded Jukebox Music Players

    Online Chat Room Apps

    Online PC Games

    Online Magazine Sites

    Online PC Game Sites

    Some Message Board Apps

    Some Online Site Creation Apps

    There are more for this list but i can’t think of any more.With the Re Addition of the No Click to Activate those problems will be fixed.

    I am sure my friends will agree with me on these that i listed for everyone to agree or disagree about.

    I am going to be happy to get this update.I know those who hate Click to Activate will like it too.

  100. mocax says:

    Maybe April 2008 is the date Eolas goes under and die.

    Or Eolas hoped some super browser would be launched in April 2008 to crush IE7.

    This shows the bad side of patents, Microsoft may be "teh evil", the anti-Microsoft aren’t any more angelic.

  101. Bruno says:

    Topaz wrote:

    "Then why did Microsoft agree to settle with EOLAS after the appeals court ruled in Microsoft’s favor and ordered a new trial? If Microsoft was so certain the patent was BS, why didn’t they go forward with a new trial?

    What’s despicable is that Microsoft used people who use IE and forced them to "click to activate" as a means of getting around the whole EOLAS mess and not accepting responsibility. The real BS is Microsoft using people as a pawn to patch their legal affairs."

    ———————————————–

    Topaz, I don’t now what Microsoft was certain of, I’m saying that the patent was BS in my own opinion.

    And BTW, someone above said that Opera had the same problem with Eolas, and I just verified that Opera has the "Click to Activate" thing too.  I guess Opera is just as evil and/or incompetent as Microsoft, right?  Grow up.  

    Every browser that has a plugin mechanism "violates" this BS patent.  Eolas only decided to go after IE and Opera, but they could’ve just as easily gone after Firefox, Safari, etc, but they didn’t because they had an agenda.  Open your eyes and see what really happened so you don’t any further publicly make yourself sound like a fool.

  102. anony.muos says:

    BTW IE TEAM, THE OTHER DAY I WAS PLAYING WITH THE IE6 VPC IMAGE (THE LATEST ONE) AND I SET THE DATE TO JANUARY 2008 EVERYWHERE, IN THE BIOS, ON THE HOST OS, IN THE VM ITSELF AND YET IT DIDN’T EXPIRE. HAS MS GIVEN AWAY A COPY OF XP PROFESSIONAL? CAN YOU CONFIRM THAT IT DOESN’T EXPIRE?

  103. Topaz says:

    Anphanax wrote:

    ROFL. Yeah, it’s "despicable" they worked around a garbage patent. It’s a shame it was ever accepted in the first place. It seems "despicable" to me that they did not go after other browser makers.

    _____________________________

    Topaz writes:

    LMAO. Microsoft worked around a "garbage patent" by inconveniencing the users?  That’s ok to do to people? To customers? Nothing wrong with that? Are you kidding me or what? I’d like to see you be inconvenienced because of somebody else’s actions or behavior and see how you like it.

    EOLAS didn’t go after other browser makers because that’s the legal decision they made. Microsoft could have legally challenged that in court for failure to join indispensable parties, but they choose not to.  

  104. Topaz says:

    Bruno wrote:

    Topaz, I don’t now what Microsoft was certain of, I’m saying that the patent was BS in my own opinion.

    And BTW, someone above said that Opera had the same problem with Eolas, and I just verified that Opera has the "Click to Activate" thing too.  I guess Opera is just as evil and/or incompetent as Microsoft, right?  Grow up.  

    Every browser that has a plugin mechanism "violates" this BS patent.  Eolas only decided to go after IE and Opera, but they could’ve just as easily gone after Firefox, Safari, etc, but they didn’t because they had an agenda.  Open your eyes and see what really happened so you don’t any further publicly make yourself sound like a fool.

    _____________________________

    Topaz writes:

    If that patent was BS, why was EOLAS’s litigation successful? The court ruled in their favor. EOLAS won. You do remember the law don’t you? Smarten up.

    EOLAS didn’t go after other browser makers because that’s the legal decision they made. Microsoft could have legally challenged that in court for failure to join indispensable parties, but they choose not to. Get the wax out of your ears. Listen to the reality of what happened so you don’t continue to make yourself look like an incompetent in public.  

  105. Harv says:

    What has all this EOLAS stuff got to do with IE8?

    I don’t see anything in the post about bug fixes for IE8, and there is nothing about W3C recommendations being added to IE?

    What’s the story?!

  106. hillary says:

    Topaz, you’re a moron.

    Read up on the history of the patent and you’ll see that it was overturned and unoverturned multiple times.  This patent is a bullshit patent.  Microsoft settled to get it out of the way, you idiot.

    Why do I not see you criticizing Opera for not challenging the patent or not working around it? Actually, what the hell is your position?  Are you criticizing Microsost (yet not Opera) for settling or not?  Do you think it’s a valid patent or not?  You’re all over the place and sounding like a complete and utter asshole.

  107. Pepper says:

    Topaz, why are you not criticizing Opera for also using Microsoft’s "Click to Activate" workaround?  Actually, it’s unclear what your criticism actually is.  You hate Microsoft, that much is clear, but your posts here have no substance to them.  Just mindless ranting.

  108. meeer says:

    hm, don’t be so rude people…

  109. Topaz says:

    hillary wrote:

    Topaz, you’re a moron.

    Read up on the history of the patent and you’ll see that it was overturned and unoverturned multiple times.  This patent is a bullshit patent.  Microsoft settled to get it out of the way, you idiot.

    Why do I not see you criticizing Opera for not challenging the patent or not working around it? Actually, what the hell is your position?  Are you criticizing Microsost (yet not Opera) for settling or not?  Do you think it’s a valid patent or not?  You’re all over the place and sounding like a complete and utter asshole.

    ______________________________

    Topaz writes:

    Get out of this blog you stupid troll. You’re nothing but a coward for insulting me using the internet as a shield. My 9 year old daughter is braver and has more class than you do. Betcha you wouldn’t insult me to my face like that.

    It’s not the history of the patent that matters but the ruling of the court that does. A jury entered a verdict in EOLAS favor and awarded EOLAS a judgment against Microsoft for $520 million. You call that a BS patent? It gets better. An appelate court ordered a new trial because the trial court erred in not letting in evidence to support Microsoft’s claim that the infringed patent is invalid because the technology had already been developed and showed in a 1993 demonstration by inventor Pei-Yuan Wei. Yet, Microsoft choose to settle! If it’s such a BS patent, why did they settle? If Microsoft was so sure it was a BS patent, they would have proceeded to a new trial, certainly money for legal fees isn’t a problem for Microsoft. Stop feeding on all the propoganda out there and take a dose of the truth.  

    And Opera is guilty of the same BS Microsoft is, subjecting users to that nonsense. And guess what? I use Internet Explorer (since 1999).  

  110. This is really good news. 🙂

    Slightly off-topic, but how about tidying up the markup for the data table in this blog entry?

    <ul>

    <li><code>&lt;th></code> is for header cells. Its default styling includes <code>text-align: center;</code> and <code>font-weight: bold;</code>, too.</li>

    <li><code>&lt;td></code> is for data cells. Its default styling of <code>text-align: left;</code> helps line-wrapped sentences be more readable.</li>

    <li>Remove “Click To Activate” for every data cell. They only need to say Yes or No. There would be no need to use red text in the "Yes" cell. Especially since you are using <code>&lt;FONT></code> for that.</li>

    <li>Remove every attribute from the table.

    </ul>

    This blog makes good use of elements for paragraphs, lists and headings. Raising the quality of this tables would set a good example.

    Oh, you could mark up inline code samples with <code>&lt;code></code> to help them stand out from normal text. For example: <code>FEATURE_ENABLE_ACTIVEX_INACTIVATE_MODE</code>. (Hopefully your comments allow basic markup so that example will make sense sense.)

  111. mocax says:

    Maybe the lawyers realized settling this thing makes more economic sense.

    We’re talking about a free web browser that may be replaced by a new version soon.

  112. ash says:

    @Topaz

    "Get out of this blog you stupid troll"

    mmmm nice.  Who’s the real troll?

    It was a BS patent, plain and simple.  It should never have got into the patent system, but it did and therefore MS lost the case.  

    Most probably they settled due to the risk of losing, even with the new evidence.  

    It is likely the recent settlement is a lot less than $520 mill, with ongoing licensing costs (while Firefox and other FOSS’s get free licensing, which is added insult).  

    I have no problem MS getting around that crap with the click to activate.  

    Anyway, aren’t there more important issues in the world to rave about?  Poverty for example?

  113. תיכף נדבר על מה ולמה… (הפוסט הזה כבר יושב אצלי &quot;בקנה&quot; כבר שבוע…) כמפתח אפליקציות אינטרנט

  114. I work on Silverlight and when I host my Silverlight application inside ASP.net application, I get "Click

  115. Evil Anonymous Code Nazi says:

    Since someone brought up the markup of this thing…

    1) Why is this page written in XHTML if Internet Explorer does not entirely support XHTML correctly?

    2) Why are there uppercase tags in this document?

    3) Why are LI tags not being closed when this is supposedly XHTML?

    4) Why are both STRONG and B present (why is either present would be a good question)?

    5) And just to be a real code snob, why is this written as follows:

    function ValidatorOnSubmit() {

       if (Page_ValidationActive) {

           return ValidatorCommonOnSubmit();

       }

       else {

           return true;

       }

    }

    When it could just as easily be written as (and for the other Evil Code Nazis, yeah, there’s an approach that avoids the branching on every call – but it has other problems):

    function ValidatorOnSubmit() {

       return (Page_ValidationActive ? ValidatorCommonOnSubmit() : true);

    }

    I could go on but I will not (Actually, I will 😛 I just *LOVE* some of the JavaScript ASP.NET creates, and how the SCRIPT tags are being done differently E.g. some have type="text/javascript", and some additionally have the language attribute, and then there’s the whole HTML Comments vs. CDATA thing).

    Anyways… It works, and the "Remember Me?" thing has a label set up properly, so I shall stop complaining now. I somehow doubt anything will be done about these problems since it’s working.

  116. xartx says:

    Read up on the history of the patent and you’ll see that it was overturned and unoverturned multiple times.  This patent is a bullshit patent.  Microsoft settled to get it out of the way, you idiot.

  117. jlgarcia says:

    Come’n guys, this situation for developers and programmers is going out of control, do you really need until April 2008 to fix this little issues?….

  118. jlgarcia says:

    Come’n guys, this situation for developers and programmers is going out of control, do you really need until April 2008 to fix this little issues?….

  119. Topaz says:

    ash wrote:

    @Topaz

    "Get out of this blog you stupid troll"

    mmmm nice.  Who’s the real troll?

    It was a BS patent, plain and simple.  It should never have got into the patent system, but it did and therefore MS lost the case.  

    Most probably they settled due to the risk of losing, even with the new evidence.  

    It is likely the recent settlement is a lot less than $520 mill, with ongoing licensing costs (while Firefox and other FOSS’s get free licensing, which is added insult).  

    I have no problem MS getting around that crap with the click to activate.  

    Anyway, aren’t there more important issues in the world to rave about?  Poverty for example?

    _________________________________

    Topaz writes:

    The real troll was the "hillary" who insulted me (that’s what trolls do) and I confronted her about it, and I wasn’t going to allow her to get away with that, and repaid her in kind.

    It’s a BS patent because you say so? It should never have got into the patent system because you say so? The US Patent and Trademark Office is wrong but you’re right?

    Then, let’s just throw away a patent, hell, the whole patent system because some people say hey, I really believe this patent is BS and I’m going to go ahead and use it for myself anyway and ignore the law. Are you kidding me or what?

    I agree that most probably Microsoft settled due to the risk of losing, even with the new evidence. Therefore, it’s not such a BS patent now is it?  

    While you may not have a problem with Microsoft getting around the patent by using "click to  activate" and you don’t mind being inconvenienced, the majority of people, myself included, do have a problem with it, don’t care to be inconvenienced, and resent being used by Microsoft as pawns in their legal games.

    Yes there are much more important issues in the world like poverty, but this is a blog about the Microsoft "click to activate" component activation, not about poverty.

    ____________________________________

    xartx wrote:

    Read up on the history of the patent and you’ll see that it was overturned and unoverturned multiple times.  This patent is a bullshit patent.  Microsoft settled to get it out of the way, you idiot.

    ____________________________________

    Topaz writes:

    Get off this blog you stupid troll! You’re a coward for insulting me behind the shield of the internet. You wouldn’t have the guts to say that to my face.  

    Read up on the history of the matter of Eolas Technologies, Incorporated vs Microsoft Corporation (U.S. Courts). Microsoft got a new trial from an appellate court. A great legal victory for them. However, Microsoft choose to settle. Microsoft doesn’t have a case. If they thought they had a good chance of winning again, they never would have settled. you fool.

  120. blade4246 says:

    I’m glad the click to activate feature will be gone, I’ve found it to be quite annoying.. Great news!

  121. Steve Rose says:

    It’s taken long enough, but at last IE7 is going to do what it should have done.

  122. manos says:

    proplem with ie7,always shut down  problem flash pl.9

  123. * CSS3 Target Property *

    http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/WD-css3-hyperlinks-20040224/#target0

    To keep it short (and I’ll probably post a YouTube video or post this on my site) add CSS3 target property support in addition to the other CSS3 properties and support for application/xhtml+xml and IE8 could by a professional web designer’s objective analysis be Web 3.0 capable.

  124. Voilà une excellente nouvelle tant pour nous développeurs Web que pour les utilisateurs et internautes

  125. Voilà une excellente nouvelle tant pour nous développeurs Web que pour les utilisateurs et internautes

  126. DT blogi says:

    Internet Explorer-i meeskond teatab IEBlog-is, et Internet Explorer-ist kaob alates tuleva aasta aprillist vajadus klikkida ActiveX põhiste komponentide aktiveerimiseks hiirega korra vastaval komponendil. Uuendus, mis tuleva aasta aprillis tehakse, ..

  127. Destin tile says:

    Hello there! Just came across your blog and thought I would say hello.

  128. china map says:

    Good News for Flash Developers!

  129. ash says:

    @Topaz

    Yeah you’re right.  I don’t know enough about the US patent system, the patent in question or the case for that matter.  I found the patent difficult to swallow due to similarities in existing technology.

  130. steve says:

    Just got this back from a MS Feedback inquiry

    "We appreciate you intent to file IE feedback. The IE site on Microsoft Connect was intended for beta feedback. The IE 7 team discontinued feedback on our site when the product released about a year ago. As largely a beta site, we do not often become involved with feedback for released products. Feedback for IE 7 is now submitted through normal support channels."

    Interesting perspective isn’t it.

    Lets journey back in time in the IE Blog shall we…

    IE Feedback finally announced!

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2006/03/24/560095.aspx

    A few key quotes:

    "What version of IE is this database for?

    The feedback site is for IE7 and future versions of IE. Feedback for the current version under development will be taken through the site. Once IE7 has shipped, it will be used to report issues with IE7 to examine for following versions."

    Hmm, that didn’t work, now did it.

    "As an issue is worked on, you should expect to see comments added to the bug giving some details."

    Yeah, that kind of died didn’t it.  Not only is the site gone now, there’s not even any updates in the IE blog.

    "There will be an ongoing blog for feedback created in the near term which will cover the top issues reported during the week"

    Hmm, yeah maybe I missed the announcement, where is this blog?

    Lets not forget the most important quote in the entire blog post:

    "After much discussion on the team, we’ve decided that people are right and that we should have a public way for people to give us feedback or make product suggestions. We wanted to build a system that is searchable and can benefit from the active community that IE has here."

    7 months later, and Feedback was closed.

    I realize that Al and Dave have moved on to greener fields, but the efforts made to have IE development involve the community resources for a better IE seem to have been all but forgotten.

    THREE HUNDRED AND NINETY ONE days into the NO 2-WAY COMMUNICATION with the MICROSOFT IE TEAM, I think I’ve just about had enough.

    Thanks for the ride, I think i’m getting off this train.

  131. Al Billings says:

    Yeah, the feedback site seems to be as dead as Dracula. Maybe it will rise again?

    I have no idea who on the IE team would work on it though. Maybe there is fresh blood interested in this crazy blogging and communication thing. Who knows?

    Oh, by the way, Firefox 3 has its first Beta out now. You can see the announcement at http://developer.mozilla.org/devnews/index.php/2007/11/19/firefox-3-beta-1-now-available-for-download/.

    I wonder when the IE8 beta will be? It’s been more than 12 months since IE7 went out the door. Surely, a beta would have to happen in the next couple of months (at most) if IE8 would want to not have a 24 month release cycle. Who knows what the reality is? No one here is talking.

  132. rc says:

    @Al Billings

    "Maybe it will rise again?"

    No, it won’t. At least in 2-3 years, though I suppose it will rise never at all.

    "I have no idea who on the IE team would work on it though."

    There is no "IE team" at this moment. Yes, I know that there are several people that are formally on the list of "IE team". But they don’t carry out any real work.

    "I wonder when the IE8 beta will be?"

    We will know something about new versions of IE in the end of 2009 or even later. Maybe there will be no new versions at all.

  133. MS licenses EOLAS code, announces plans to drop ‘click to activate’ hack for all IE 7 users in an April 2008 update. No word yet on whether Microsoft will also remove the hack from IE 6….

  134. Kyle says:

    @Al Bilings

    yeah, downloaded Firefox 3 beta already.. its so nice to see a browser that is actually moving forward!

    I know rc is a bit.. pesimistic? shall we say? but one has to wonder with the complete lack of info on this blog.

    btw, you’ve been doing some awesome work on the mozilla side of things Al!  Glad to see you are getting the chance to be part of a really productive software team.

  135. Al Billings says:

    Rc,

    I know for a fact that there is an IE team still. I have friends that are still on the project or who have left in the last six months. They aren’t feeding me data or anything but I know for a fact that the IE team exists and is, well, working on IE. The details of that work are what is lacking. Given Dean’s previous promise during IE7 to not go dark again and to release often, I’m just wondering what the plan is after a year.

    Kyle, thanks. I mostly work on organizing and testing the security releases and in the new Places feature for Firefox 3, which replaces the existing bookmarks and history system with a sqlite backend and a bunch of APIs for talking to it. It’s cool stuff.

  136. Al Billings says:

    In other words, rc, no matter how many times you post on every blog post here that the IE team doesn’t exist, you’re still wrong. 🙂  I’m not sure what the motivation is when people do come and go from the IE team and members of it have spoken to people at various companies, including the Mozilla Corporation, at conferences and meetings in the last while. It exists.

  137. multi post cause spam filter is a pain says:

    part (2)

    It is like an absolutely perfect environment where the developer community can not only see what is going on, not only report issues they find, submit test cases, and track bugs and features, but should the development team not have the time or resources, YOU the clever developer can even contribute code to fix things!

    In contrast, ALL WEB DEVELOPERS have NO IDEA what is happening in IE DEVELOPMENT, we can’t submit BUGS, we can’t request FEATURES, we can’t TRACK a gosh darn thing, and there isn’t even a 50,000ft overview of what is going on in IE8?!

    Please correct me if I’m wrong, but it appears blatantly obvious to me that Microsoft does not care one iota about the Developer Community!?

    Feedback was closed "temporarily"…. by anyones definition, is not "Over a year".

    I know that focus has likely been put on Vista (because of a complete lack of sales), but lets be honest, without a state-of-the-art web browser in the OS, you haven’t got a complete OS.

  138. multi post cause spam filter is a pain says:

    part (2)

    It is like an absolutely perfect environment where the developer community can not only see what is going on, not only report issues they find, submit test cases, and track bugs and features, but should the development team not have the time or resources, YOU the clever developer can even contribute code to fix things!

    In contrast, ALL WEB DEVELOPERS have NO IDEA what is happening in IE DEVELOPMENT, we can’t submit BUGS, we can’t request FEATURES, we can’t TRACK a gosh darn thing, and there isn’t even a 50,000ft overview of what is going on in IE8?!

    Please correct me if I’m wrong, but it appears blatantly obvious to me that Microsoft does not care one iota about the Developer Community!?

    Feedback was closed "temporarily"…. by anyones definition, is not "Over a year".

    I know that focus has likely been put on Vista (because of a complete lack of sales), but lets be honest, without a state-of-the-art web browser in the OS, you haven’t got a complete OS.

  139. multi post cause spam filter is a pain says:

    part(3c)

    And "IE7 sucks" on Google returns 804,000 results! this points to a rather unhapper user base, does it not?

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=IE7+sucks&btnG=Search&meta=

    Without involving the Developer Community, I fail to see how this situation can improve?

  140. DelfinoM says:

    @the person above

    A google search for "firefox sucks" returns 2,030,000 results. So don’t even go there.

  141. Anphanax says:

    DelfinoM, A google search for "firefox sucks", comes back with 18,800 results. Sure, if you remove the quotes, I can get the same value you did, but let’s think about this for a second:

    a) These results have no context applied to them.

    b) Searching for "firefox AND sucks", like you did, is even worse. There is no rule that states which order those words are in, nor is there a rule that would prohibit this kind of result:

    Internet Explorer sucks, Firefox does not. (contains both FIREFOX and SUCKS, does it not?)

    Any idiot can criticize someone/something else. They often do. Trolling is easy and people with half a brain can see through this crap. Please do not feed the trolls. Do not kid yourself into thinking that you can reason with them.

  142. versions matter says:

    The bit missed was the version.

    The search was for "IE7 sucks" (note the version)

    If you did the same with the latest version of Firefox:

    "firefox 2 sucks" – you’d get a measly 219 results.

    I think the other links to professional corporate PC software reviews shows the more scary reality.  People don’t like Vista, and they aren’t thrilled to bits about IE7 either.

    My concern is for this blog.  It stopped being useful the day IE7 shipped.  This blog is mainly for developers that want to follow the progress of IE, but there has not been any discussed here in 12 months.

    sad, just sad.

  143. Chris Koenig says:

    I’m not sure how I missed this one, but for those of you not following Tim Heuer’s blog, he’s recently

  144. Finally. Microsoft Internet Explorer users, which comprise 76% of the Internet world, will no longer have to "click to activate" when viewing embedded controls such as flash movies on web pages. Microsoft had kept the requirement in order to avoid…

  145. Ken Schaefer says:

    Wow, what a big set of weeks the past few have been (and I&#39;ve been too busy doing other things to

  146. Satisfy Me says:

    Quick post between meetings that I wrote up before the kids headed off to school today… a week’s worth

  147. Kurzbeschreibung: Optionales Update, welches das Ausführen von ActiveX-Controls auf Webseiten wieder aktiviert, ohne dass das ActiveX-Control-Element zusätzlich angeklickt werden muss ("Hier klicken zum Aktivieren"). Das sogenannte "IE ACA (Automatic

  148. Kurzbeschreibung: Optionales Update, welches das Ausführen von ActiveX-Controls auf Webseiten aktiviert, ohne dass das ActiveX-Control-Element zusätzlich angeklickt werden muss ("Hier klicken zum Aktivieren"). Das sogenannte "IE ACA (Automatic Componen

  149. IEBlog says:

    A couple of weeks ago, we announced that an optional preview for the Internet Explorer Automatic Component

  150. JMischa says:

    Es ist wieder mal OOP und viele Techies, Architekten, PLs und Middlemanager pilgern zur Messe München

  151. Kurzbeschreibung: Optionales Update, welches das Ausführen von ActiveX-Controls auf Webseiten wieder aktiviert, ohne dass das ActiveX-Control-Element zusätzlich angeklickt werden muss ("Hier klicken zum Ausführen"). Das sogenannte "IE ACA (Automatic Com

  152. Kurzbeschreibung: Optionales Update, welches das Ausführen von ActiveX-Controls auf Webseiten wieder aktiviert, ohne dass das ActiveX-Control-Element zusätzlich angeklickt werden muss ("Hier klicken zum Ausführen"). Das sogenannte "IE ACA (Automatic Com

  153. IEBlog says:

    The second optional preview for the Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation is available. This

  154. The second optional preview for the Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation is available. This

  155. Bink.nu says:

    The second optional preview for the Internet Explorer Automatic Component Activation is available. This

  156. Huhtikuussa 2006 Microsoft teki muutoksen tapaan, jolla web-sivulla oleva ActiveX-komponentti ladattiin

  157. Huhtikuussa 2006 Microsoft teki muutoksen tapaan, jolla web-sivulla oleva ActiveX-komponentti ladattiin

  158. On my Deep zoom Post , I recommended that for Deep Zoom applications you instantiate the control using

  159. Kurzbeschreibung: Kumulatives Sicherheitsupdate, das aufgetretene Sicherheitslücken im Windows Internet Explorer 7 schließen soll. Siehe Security Bulletin MS08-024 (englisch bzw. deutsch) Aktuell: ja direkter Download oder über Windows Update. E

  160. Kurzbeschreibung: Kumulatives Sicherheitsupdate für Internet Explorer 6 unter Windows XP SP2. Siehe Security Bulletin MS08-024 (englisch bzw. deutsch). Aktuell: ja direkter Download oder über Windows Update. Ersetzt: Alle bislang erschienenen K

  161. IEBlog says:

    The IE Automatic Component Activation (IE ACA) update is now available as part of the April 2008 Internet

  162. Bink.nu says:

    The IE Automatic Component Activation (IE ACA) update is now available as part of the April 2008 Internet

  163. Tim Heuer says:

    If you are doing Silverlight development, you are no doubt slapping in the &lt;object&gt; tag or using

  164. Many Silverlight developers have noticed a rather fundamental change between the Silverlight installation/instantiation

  165. One of the most annoying developments over recent years has been the &quot;Click here to active this control&quot; message you get whenever visiting sites that use Flash or other browser plugin technology. The worst is when it is used in a menu or some

  166. Cheap zolpidem. Zolpidem overnight. Zolpidem without prescription. Zolpidem abuse. Zolpidem.