100 Million IE7 Installations!


I’m pleased to report that on January 8th, we had the 100 millionth IE7 installation. However, even more important than installations is usage. According to WebSideStory (the company we use to measure browser usage), as of this week, over 25% of all visitors to websites in the US were using IE7, making IE7 the second most used browser after IE6. We expect these numbers to continue to rise as we complete our final localized versions, scale up AU distribution, and with the consumer availability of Windows Vista on January 30, 2007.

If you haven’t installed IE7 for Windows XP yet, you can download it here. You won’t need to download it for Windows Vista as it has IE7 built in with all the same features as the XP version, plus Protected Mode.

Tony Chor
Group Program Manager

Comments (168)

  1. How many were people installing for the third time in an attempt to get it working 😉

    Just kidding. Congratulations to the team; here’s hoping web developers can start to reduce support for IE 6 sooner then the 2010 date that some people have bandied about.

  2. 12/01/2007

    100 Millions faut l`faire franchement félicitation je le veut sur mon pc.

    Alain Beaulieu

    alian7msn.com

  3. 12/01/2007

    J`ai remarqué une chose avec explorer 7 l`ordinateur se comporte moins bien qu`avec explorer 6.

    Les pages sautes il se ferme pas quand on clic sur le X rouge je l`sais je l`avais explorer 7 en me levant ce matin mais j`ai fais une restauration de mon ordinateur explorer 7 je l`connais.

  4. Jim V says:

    How many of the Microsoft websites don’t yet support IE7?

    Still, all-in-all, many fewer complaints than the transition to XP SP1 brought.

    Great work.

  5. zuneone says:

    Yahoo!  

    I love IE7 – congratulations guys for the best browser ever!

  6. Although it’s great to see the IE6 numbers falling, I would still love to hear something about what is planned for IE8 and when is it coming out. While IE7 is a real improvement in comparison to IE6, it’s still not good enough. Developing CSS and JavaScript for Firefox and Opera is still so much easier… Let’s hope that IE6 will disappear as soon as possible…

  7. Marco says:

    100 Million installations, I installed but still use FireFox as my primary. You may find many people installing it as MS is forcing it as a high security update. In reality how many web sites are actually seeing it.

  8. Ron says:

    I’ll be cheering when IE6 is non-existent.

  9. Ken says:

    This information can be inaccurate.  They don’t know if my Konqueror browser is identifying itself as IE7.

  10. cooperpx says:

    @ Michal

    Speculation I desperately wish to believe is untrue:

    http://www.activewin.com/awin/comments.asp?HeadlineIndex=37964&Group=1

    I seriously hope to hear something from MSFT on the subject because I cannot stomach being forced to use GIFs over PNGs with any kind of transparency (as they print as 2 bit images) for another year at minimum.

  11. Matt Wiebe says:

    So, how’s IE8 coming?

    Not to knock the steps that IE7 has taken, but there’s still some work to do. At least I might be able to use PNGs sometime…

  12. matt says:

    my webstats for my website shows firefox as the #1 browser, and ie 6 as the second…

    here are my past 24hr hits…..

    Firefox 1.5.0 106  35%

    Internet Explorer 6.0 103  34%

    Internet Explorer 7.0 44  15%

  13. Brody says:

    Good work, where is the IE8 preview??? :)

  14. TAG says:

    Man. What can you expect else then Microsoft push IE 7.0 to all users using Automatic Update and Windows/Microsoft Update as CRITICAL update ?

    Something I don’t get – is this critical for me to install it or it’s critical for Microsoft Corporation to force me install it ?

    I’ve to deny automatic updates several times – as I’m using Firefox for Internet and would like to not upgrade IE – as there is no reasons to fix something that not broken (local application like MS Help and others are working fine). But a lot of users have automatic update "automatically download and install" options and they have no choice.

    I’ve not seen much users voluntary installing IE 7. In contrast – users do install Opera and Firefox on their own will.

  15. Alex says:

    @TAG: IE 7 installation is voluntary, when IE 7 is downloaded the user is presented with the screen ‘An update to Internet Explorer is available. Would you like to install it now?’

    The user is offered 3 choices: Yes, No, Remind me later. Throughout the entire installation process the user can change his mind. So, IE 7 installation is entirely voluntary.

  16. @TAG:

    Besides, only an inept computer-neophyte would argue with a company (who has heavy investments in trying to secure their previously-insecure software) that says "previous versions are insecure… this version is more secure."

    Do you think Microsoft would lie about IE6’s insecurity? Of course it’s insecure. Have you forgotten all the previous security bulletins on this blog?

    Now, do you remember that most of those bulletins also said "but IE7 is NOT impacted by this exploit"?

  17. not_acurate says:

    web stats are notoriously inaccurate.  browser spoofing is common place (e.g. Opera reports as IE6 most of the time)

    Developers hit sites, testing in all browsers, even the ones they hate.

    And any web stats tracked by adware/spyware, like… hmmmm HITBOX?!?! which WebSideStory uses, are also skewed, because so many users block that kind of garbage, via Spybot, or Adblock, Adblock Plus, etc.

    Also, most non-Outhouse users block email images and cookies in HTML email, so spam that ends up there isn’t being tracked as the true client either.

  18. George says:

    I am seeing many naive users keeping their runonce screen without knowing how to change it…As i said before reset it back to the old homepage if the user dont confirm settings in the runonce screen after a certain timeframe (say 6 days)

  19. Just upgraded to IE7 from IE6, but lost access to all e-mail messages stored in IE6.

    Can anyone tell how to access them?  Would be very grateful for response.

    Walt

  20. chichi133@optonline.net says:

    No help to me.  I will uninstall given chronic shut down errors and no cure in sight.  Thanks Microsoft!

  21. @Microsoft:

    Please remember that the small minority is often the whiniest. I for one applaud you for IE7 and look forward to news on IE8 *hint hint*.

  22. Young says:

    IE7 want to checkup Windows license. This is stop updates in more countries: china, russia etc.

  23. Is it true that Outlook 2007 will use the Microsoft Word HTML "engine" that only supports tables and inline CSS and not the recently updated trident rendering engine of IE7? I’m hoping this was a decision by another department in Microsoft that you yourselves felt slapped in the face after all your hard work. If the news is true it will motivate huge portions of people to not give a squat about supporting Outlook 2007 HTML email and corporate dominance or not see that product’s shares erode away.

  24. TAG says:

    Wraith Daquell:

    Reread my message. I trust Microsoft then they say that IE6 is insecure – so I use Firefox for internet pages. There is no reasons to upgrade something I’m not using actively.

  25. mwe says:

    I installed IE7 and after a day uninstalled it.

    IE7 does not work with my touch pad ‘back page’ function. Like always why upgrade if  with upgrade you lose exsisting functions.

  26. Steve Larson says:

    Can anyone, I mean anyone, tell me how to fix that maddening feature of IE7 where all the Favorites folders expand automatically when adding favorites?  Please

  27. Mateusz says:

    Yes of course. Most of them are automatics updates from IE6 made by OS. The overal trend is against IEx . FireFox is gaining more and more usage. Thera are countries , esspecialy those who start IT revolution later like Poland or Finland , where usage of Firefox is close to 50% …

    Long Live Open Source !!!! :)

  28. @TAG

    "I’ve to deny automatic updates several times – as I’m using Firefox for Internet and would like to not upgrade IE – as there is no reasons to fix something that not broken"

    I was only commenting that IE6 is broken – and all the apps that relied on it were thus.

  29. Dileepa P says:

    Congrats!

    I have a question about IE7 on Vista. What actually is happening when I press F11 to go into the full screen view? Why does everything flicker? I see that just before it switches to full screen view, the skin changes to Vista Basic. Why is that?

  30. James says:

    It only looks more advanced but I assure you that it does the same things as IE6.

  31. megaman says:

    i am waiting 4 the mui pack to install it again…-.-|||

  32. HeartRock7 says:

    I have downloaded the update and have had nothing with problems. My mail won’t work and desktop shortcuts won’t launch.

  33. veridicus says:

    So you push an application out as a critical update and then pat yourself on the back that people are using it?

    You can pretty much ignore WebSideStory stats.  They’re very inaccurate.

    Congratulations on finally making a lot of fixes to your browser.  It’s about time.  As a web developer on Linux I’ve had to deal with IE6’s horrible CSS support for years.

  34. Not veridicus says:

    Much bitterness from Firefox fanboys–to be expected since IE7 pushes their volunteer effort into third place.  Tsk tsk, fellows!

  35. DaveM says:

    Web stats are very skewed, in favour of IE. Most ‘other’ browsers report as being IE to avoid various problems. You don’t hear of Opera impersonating Firefox, or Netscape impersonating Opera… So whatever the IE stats, I would take at least 10-25% off

  36. Xepol says:

    Could someone pop over to http://windowsvistablog.com/blogs/ with IE7 on XP sp2 and click into one of the articles and try to scroll (either with the scroller or the mouse wheel) a few times?

    Every second visit to the site seems to completely kill my IE7 browser in the nastiest dead app kinda way.

    I’m curious if this is an IE 7 problem or something with the Vistablog site itself.

  37. Paul S says:

    Some good news :)

    Now the bad, why did the Office 2007 team decide to go back to the dark ages of web browsing by making Outlook 2007 use MS Word for HTML email rendering?

    Is there a blog for Office, all the ones I’ve found haven’t been posted too for ages.

  38. This is great news.

    And this also means Searching in full Privacy with Ixquick is available now via the IE7 Search box for 100 milion people…

    The Ixquick.com Search plugin is ailable since last week on: http://eu.ixquick.com/eng/download_ixquick_plugin.html

    Searching with Ixquick means combining the 11 most popular search engines in one, without your personal details are being stored!

    Why is this privacy so important: http://eu.ixquick.com/eng/protect_privacy.html

    http://www.ixquick.com

    Best regards,

    Alex van Eesteren

  39. TBinSTL says:

    I wonder how my 4 installs and removals are counted. I still can’t get media streaming to work and I’ve searched out and tried at least a half dozen fixes that never fix my problem…..I love everything else about IE7 and would love to use it but the damn thing even kills my ability to stream video and audio in Firfox!?!?!

  40. Lionel says:

    Web stat may well be skewed in favor of IE, but are they skewed in favor of *IE 7*? I would guess that user agent spoofing would rather favor IE 6 (since this is the version that has the most chances to bypass misguided browser checks) and that IE 7 stats are rather accurate.

  41. rc says:

    @DaveM

    "You don’t hear of Opera impersonating Firefox, or Netscape impersonating Opera…"

    These isolated instances don’t constitute any noticeable number in comparsion with main browsers’ statistics.

  42. Corrine says:

    According to Bill Pytlovany/WinPatrol, the statistics he is seeing are even higher for IE7.

    Pingback:  http://securitygarden.blogspot.com/2007/01/microsoft-ie-vista-teams-need-winpatrol.html

  43. Borat says:

    You did intentionally forget to mention one important fact:

    Most installations are "forced" updates because of Windows Update telling the users to update as a security bugfix.

    Keep it real!

  44. noname says:

    my recommendation for those 100 Millions: http://www.mozilla.com/

  45. Lester says:

    Can you pls tell the MS Office people to stop messing with user settings during those security updates?

    I use the Bat for email, but every time I get a patch fro a security hole in MS Office, it resets Outlook to be my email client.

    This is at least the 8th time this has happened and it is getting very unprofessional.  I don’t mind Microsoft innovating, but being childish and using dirty tricks to try to make me switch is Not going to win me over, in fact it does just the opposite!

    les

  46. dan says:

    I can’t find the download link for IE7 SP1.

    Can you post the uri on this blog, as there’s no obvious link on the Internet Explorer section.

  47. CableGuy says:

    The statistics on my website http://www.cablemodem.ch only showes 7,9% of InternetExplorer 7 visitors. At the lead there is still Firefox with 48,2% followed by InternetExplorer 6 with 19,1%.

  48. Via the Microsoft IEBlog, Internet Explorer 7 has its 100 millionth download. According to WebSideStory…

  49. Aedrin says:

    "FireFox is gaining more and more usage. Thera are countries , esspecialy those who start IT revolution later like Poland or Finland , where usage of Firefox is close to 50% …"

    http://www.thecounter.com/stats/2007/January/browser.php

  50. richard says:

    Cheers!!

    I found myself IE7 is useful.

    Thanks

  51. kauL says:

    How many of them installed IE7 manually. I think most of the 100 Million got forced to by automatic windows-updates.

  52. Aedrin says:

    "I think most of the 100 Million got forced to by automatic windows-updates."

    As was pointed out before, it was not forced.

    It was optional.

  53. Kelly White says:

    From the IEBlog 100 Million downloads of IE7 Over 25% of all visitors to websites in the US were using

  54. TMaster says:

    Congratulations guys!

    May everyone using IE6 be upgrading soon!

  55. EJ says:

    Good news. Now if only a lot more IE6 users would upgrade (a lot of people I know ahven’t even heard of IE7), though there are reasons why some stick with IE.

    IE7’s a great browser, for me it’s fast and uses little RAM (Though IE6 probably did the same). I love clicking on the browser icon and have it appear there instantaneously. True, I’m more of an Opera user myself, but only because it has more features that I make frequent use of. Without Opera, IE7 would be my first choice.

    Now the only thing that needs doing for IE7 is to fix all the security vunlerabilities, not just the critical ones. IE is losing market to Firefox, you’d win back a lot of users if it turned out IE was much more secure than Firefox.

  56. Aedrin says:

    "IE is losing market to Firefox, you’d win back a lot of users if it turned out IE was much more secure than Firefox."

    Losing at a very slow rate. Unless something drastic happened, by the time the next version of IE comes out, FireFox will still only have a small slice of marketshare.

    While it does have some good features. It not being able to run for more than half a day without requiring a restart is not something to be proud of.

  57. Ian Thomas says:

    As a web developer, this can only be a good thing. Even I, as a Mozilla & Firefox fanatic since about 2000, can see that. The sooner we can forget about IE6 the better. Its just a shame that this isn’t reducing the IE5 population at all, since they are already approaching a level that can be ignored, or at least relegated to "so long as you can read the text" status.

    Out of interest, does anyone have any figures they can use to compare the growth of IE6 SP2 against IE7?

  58. Michael Robert says:

    Do you really think there would be an IE 7 if Firefox, Opera, and all those alternate browsers had not come along?  I think not!  Add to that, IE 7 upgrade is an update.  Remember figures can lie and liars can figure!

  59. Mark M says:

    @Aedrin – if you cant get firefox to run for more than half a day I would have a good look at your system. Too many faults gets attributed to a "program", Microsoft unfairly cops a bit of this, when it is in fact 3rd party products and bad drivers.

    I dont have a problem with Firefox or IE7 crashing on XP or Vista RC2 and no problems with Firefox on Linux or OSX. I prefer Firefox purely because it suits me better.

    People should pick whatever suits them best much like operating systems.

    I have no hesitation in recommending people who want to use IE to upgrade to IE7 because it is a better program that IE6 and on a par with Firefox.

    Let them try Firefox, IE and Opera. Everybody has different needs use what gets the job done for you.

  60. I had been using IE7 as soon as it was available in its final download.  However, when I tried to re-install MS Premium over the Internet, it required me to uninstall IE7 so I could continue with the re-installation using IE6. I then ran into an internal problem which my tech support did not recognize. Quaere: why did not microsoft make IE7 compatible with MS Premium since both programs are theirs?

  61. On January 8th Microsoft surpassed the 100 Million user mark with Internet Explorer 7 . I think this

  62. FF says:

    The only reason IE7 has 100mil installations is because of MS pushing it as a critical update through WindowsUpdate and the Autoupdate mechanism  in XP SP2.

    I challenge MS not to use the critical update to push IE7 out and you’ll see the adoption rate is much lower than what they claim. While better than IE6, IE7 is still garbage when it comes to standards compliance and CSS support.

  63. rhettman says:

    IE7 is like the old Jaguars, looks great but runs like crap and always breaking down.

    I regret installing IE7 as now none of online-school hardware works with it. There is even a notice to all students at http://www.capella.edu that says do not use IE7 as it does not work with the WEBct and Blackboard programs. The Java does not work with it very well either, also the streaming video like from foxnews.com does not work anymore either, even after updating all of the software for FLASH, Shockwave, etc.

    This is causing millions of frutrations along with my own.

    I remember the hype of other Windows products of the past and how much of a resource hog they were, this is not impressing me. Tell Bill that he should test his software and make sure it works properly instead of shipping an inferior product in hopes to be competitive.

    It is sad for Microsoft to have their name on a product that has so many problems. No wonder the stock is not doing so well. I expect better from my old compadres, yes I used to work for Microsoft in the 1990s. You all can do much better than this, I know so.

    Rhettman A. Mullis, Jr.

    President

    SAFEHouse

  64. rhettman says:

    Sorry, I meant school software. It is pathetic that I have to run to different web browswers, Mozilla/Firefox for school and any web streaming and IE7 for the other little things.

    Rhettman A. Mullis, Jr.

    President

    SAFEHouse

  65. IE7 is a DISASTER for small businesses, in that it screws up OE6 so that emails with attachments print without headers & in minute type – hopeless for legal hard copies, etc. Also, it often fails to print all of a web page – hopeless for corporate research at speed.

    Before Redmond gets too self congratulatory, suggest you look at the drop out rate to Firefox.

  66. someone who would love the following FIXED in 7.0.5730.11 says:

    PLEASE FIX !

    Each time IE7 is opened, the value of the "Width" entry in registry key

    HKU*user*SoftwareMicrosoftInternet ExplorerLinksExplorer

    automatically increments by 1 !!

    Stop this crazyness.

    Also, please make IE7 remember the previous PIN STATUS after the FAVORITE

    CENTER is closed.

    Each time favorite center is closed then reopen, it will be back to

    non-pined state regardless if it was pinned before or not. IMO it should be

    remembered! It’s annoying when you want to use PINNED all the time to have to set it manually.

  67. Fduch says:

    IE7 without Maxthon 2 cannot be called even Release Candidate.

  68. Fduch says:

    BTW IE7 is the only browser I saw that has crashes due to flash. Even IE6 is OK.

  69. justin says:

    Nice work schmucks.  You managed to maintain the same flaws in IE 6, while breaking the old work-arounds to those flaws people spent years figuring out, and introducing brand new bugs and inconsistencies in CSS/HTML rendering at the same time.

    So I, as a web-developer, get to look forward to spending 20% of my time developing my application, and the other 80% tuning it so it behaves as expected on IE.  This truly is innovation!

    ANYTHING but IE.  100 million installs = 100 million unlucky users.

  70. BetaNews got word from IE group program manager Tony Chor via the official IEBlog that Microsoft’s latest

  71. Vectart says:

    I was tested IE7. It’s slower and not valid.

    I don’t recommend install it.

  72. Sentido Web says:

    IE7, descargas ie7, firefox, estadisticas navegadores

  73. Aedrin says:

    "breaking the old work-arounds"

    You mean hacks (as in kluges, temporary fixes, not recommended for production).

    "forward to spending 20% of my time developing my application, and the other 80% tuning it so it behaves as expected on IE"

    Maybe you shouldn’t mindlessly use other people’s hacks and instead figure out a solution yourself? (Non-hack solution) That way you won’t have to come here and complain either.

    Since IE7 I have stopped recommending FireFox because most non-technical users are just better off with IE7.

  74. doc0tis says:

    @Aedrin

    Perhaps you should read the posts that you reply to.

    1) "FireFox is gaining more and more usage. There are countries , especially those who start IT revolution later like Poland or Finland , where usage of Firefox is close to 50% …" Emphasis on Poland and Finland. Also, at the risk of sounding like a broken record, "Webstats are unreliable".

    2) "You mean hacks (as in kluges, temporary fixes, not recommended for production)." Hacks and workarounds may be required in production when you do not control all the source code. For instance if IE does not display properly (according to web standards) then, I would say, hacks and workarounds may be required.

    3) I think that people mean the IE7 was pushed upon them rather than a true voluntary download. These numbers wouldn’t be nearly this high if it wasn’t for Windows AU. The "success" of IE7’s 100 million is not so much success by the browser, it is the success of the "marketing strategy", the marketing being the browser being ranked as a Critical Update, scaring those who don’t know better into installing it.

    NOTE: I haven’t used IE7, I am perfectly content with FF2.

    –doc0tis

  75. Phil Green says:

    "The only reason IE7 has 100mil installations is because of MS pushing it as a critical update through WindowsUpdate and the Autoupdate mechanism  in XP SP2."

    Do people who keep saying this simply not read other peoples’ comments or something? It has been said MANY TIMES (even in this entry’s comments), that this was not the case. The installation was OPTIONAL…

    op·tion·al

    –adjective

    1. left to one’s choice; not required or mandatory: Formal dress is optional.

    2. leaving something to choice.

    To quote a blog post on the matter:

    "AU will notify users when IE7 is ready to install and show a welcome screen that presents key features and choices to “Install”, “Don’t Install”, or “Ask Me Later”"

    (http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2006/07/26/678149.aspx)

    People had a choice…. what part of that do you people not understand?

  76. Mickey says:

    Do the IETeam have any statistics for [Automatic Update/Forced/Prompt non-savvy users with ‘security’ recommendations so they panic and just click OK] (select your preferred response here) downloads versus ‘voluntary’ downloads? It would be interesting to see the proportions.

  77. This is an interesting one – I have IE 7 installed on all my machines except my SBS 2003 server and the

  78. JD on EP says:

    Adoption rates: The Microsoft Internet Explorer team reports one hundred million completed installations of IE7 as of Jan 8 this year. The browser was released on Oct 18, and went into Microsoft’s auto-update mechanism in November. That’s 82 days for

  79. Jenny Hisserich says:

    Congratulations MS Developers on a job well-done. I love IE7. I’m getting really sick of the sour grapes comments by the users of other browsers. I downloaded IE7 and installed it on purpose and have not regretted it. All it rquires is to use some common sense and follow the simple installation instructions. Updates are not pushed on the dumb users. There are choices with any of the updates. If you don’t want them pushed, turn off auto update and install what you want manually. Duh!

  80. Catrina says:

    ever since my computer downloaded IE7 without my permission, I’ve hated it. It wont open 30% of pages, cookies are hidden all over the damn place and IT DOESN"T WORK !!!!

    I dont have a godamn tech department to look at it or fix it, I have to pay someone to come out and fix my g-d computer. May you all rot in hell.

  81. News says:

    1. IE7 đạt con số 100 triệu lượt cài đặt Trong công bố hôm thứ 6 vừa qua, Microsoft cho biết…

  82. Igor says:

    Looks like IE8 is on the way.  other people are watching for it.  It will probably be bundled with Longhorn server (Windows Server 2007).

    http://ie7update.com/.

  83. NikLaw says:

    Thanks MS! After having installed IE7 I couldn´t access my router settings anymore even using firefox. So I dumped it and did a roll back to IE6, because I need my router for some reason I can´t remember.

  84. ken says:

    Asa Dotzler wraps up for an article by information week.

    http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/2007/01/ie7_impact.html

    Quote: "Bottom line: IE7 growth is coming exclusively from IE6 while Firefox continues to eat into IE’s overall share."

    I’ve been doing IT for years, and I’ve got to say that this is bang on the money!

    that said, IE7 is definitely a big improvement over IE6 security wise, and with bug fixes for rendering. it is too bad it was at the expense of shipping a lousy un-friendly user interface.

    ken

  85. Gregg Keizer at InformationWeek observes that Despite 100 Million IE 7 Installs, Microsoft’s Browser Still Loses Ground: “[As of] January 8th, we had the 100 millionth IE7 installation,” said Tony Chor, an IE group program manager, ..

  86. steve_web says:

    @Phil Green

    "Optional" in the case of IE7, is not well defined.

    As a user, my Operating System checks automatically for updates.

    It reports back, that there is a CRITICAL update for me to get IE7 to improve my security, etc.

    To a technical web-aware person, we just read this as yeah, yeah… but to the "Moms, Dads, Kids, Grandparents, and all non-techy users", this reads as: "Hey! you need to install this right away! for the security of your PC!"

    So, yeah, it is optional, and you can choose to say NO, but nowhere does it say.

    "By the way, some sites you visit may not work anymore, or may look strange", "some software you use regularly will choke if you install this", "you will lose the ability to customize your toolbars when you install this", "crashes and odd system performance and visual glitches have been noted by several thousand users"

    Lets put it this way, if AU indicated that there was a CRITICAL update, for users to INSTALL Firefox, do you think that would be considered "Optional"?

    Man, can you imagine the market share for Firefox if it was offered as an AU? Yikes! now that would be some seriously interesting stats!

  87. One of the reasons I prefer firefox for web development is the javascript (1.5) / error (2.0) console.  IE7’s still stuck with an error-reporting system that misrepresents the problematic filename (always points to the source page, rather than a linked in CSS or JS page), and is almost always off by one or more when reporting the line number.  

    And don’t get me started on Microsoft Script Debugger.  For gods sake, the filename and line number is enough, just report it accurately.  Also, the previous / next is a UI faux pas; present all encountered errors as a scrollable list, thanks.

    That said, I’ve noticed that pages built for Firefox invariably work well in IE7.  Thanks for not giving us an additional headache.  Webstandards are a Good Thing ™.

    Now if only you had native SVG support.

  88. Aedrin says:

    "3) I think that people mean the IE7 was pushed upon them rather than a true voluntary download. These numbers wouldn’t be nearly this high if it wasn’t for Windows AU. The "success" of IE7’s 100 million is not so much success by the browser, it is the success of the "marketing strategy", the marketing being the browser being ranked as a Critical Update, scaring those who don’t know better into installing it."

    That is indeed possible. Calling it marketing. But you could also call it being responsible. I bet out of those 100 million users, 30-40% wouldn’t have updated otherwise (didn’t know about update, etc.). Some would like to call this "forcing", and it is easy to do so when you’re trying to be negative towards Microsoft (it’s still cool to be it seems).

    However, on the other hand. It does improve the situation for users and web developers. So instead of 30-40 million users still using IE6, they’re now using IE7, with arguably less flaws/security issues.

    So call it what you want, but most of those people don’t need FireFox. And won’t benefit from it either. They just want to use what comes with their OS.

    @steve_web

    "To a technical web-aware person, we just read this as yeah, yeah… but to the "Moms, Dads, Kids, Grandparents, and all non-techy users", this reads as: "Hey! you need to install this right away! for the security of your PC!"

    So, yeah, it is optional, and you can choose to say NO, but nowhere does it say.

    "By the way, some sites you visit may not work anymore, or may look strange", "some software you use regularly will choke if you install this", "you will lose the ability to customize your toolbars when you install this", "crashes and odd system performance and visual glitches have been noted by several thousand users""

    Most non-technical users click Yes. They don’t think oh this is critical, they just click Yes or Ok. Whichever gets the screen away for them.

    And you should phrase it differently.

    ‘By the way, some sites you visit may not work anymore, or may look better", "some software you use regularly will choke if you install this, but this is normal for new software and you just need to ensure you have the latest updates", "you will lose the ability to customize your main toolbar when you install this, but it is efficient enough you won’t need it and can still install most other toolbars", "crashes and odd system performance and visual glitches have been noted by several thousand users, but very few have been confirmed"’

    "Man, can you imagine the market share for Firefox if it was offered as an AU? Yikes! now that would be some seriously interesting stats!"

    Yeah. Imagine Joe sitting behind his computer.

    A big screen comes up.

    "Please choose your browser:

    Microsoft Internet Explorer

    Mozilla FireFox"

    Joe: *clicks IE*

    Why?

    1) Microsoft is the maker of their operating system. If it is from the same producer it is most likely going to work better with it.

    2) Internet Explorer -> Exploring the internet

      Mozilla FireFox -> Is this some japanese sci fi movie?

    They might not be obvious reasons to you. But to the average user there are different reasons for using something.

    And yes, you could put in a little description for each. But how true would they be, if they were written by their respective owner? And what is the chance of the user actually reading it carefully?

  89. Congratulations to the IE7 team. I am sure it is a terrific browser, and you have every right to be as proud of your work as I am of mine. (Must admit – I haven’t actually tried IE7, because I am happy with Firefox). As a programmer, I think all those nasty comments and criticisms that you are getting are uncalled for, and show a complete lack of professional courtesy. Just because you work for a convicted monopolist corporation doesn’t justify the personal attacks. I am sure that you software developers cannot be held responsible for corporate policies, and that you are probably paid well enough that you don’t lie awake at night worrying about them.

  90. Vityok says:

    Will IE7 have a localization pack for ukrainian-speaking users? I mean, that OSS has a lot better localization support than anything that comes from microsoft.

    Віндовоз має вмерти!

  91. LPA says:

    Congratulations on the milestone! I use IE7 and Firefox on an equal basis – it actually cool to run them side by side on my dual monitor system. Certain websites work better in one or the other. And I agree – it was a completely voluntary upgrade that I had the option of not choosing. For those of you who may whine and complain – relish the fact that you have a choice. Run them both – it won’t hurt. I promise.

    LPA

  92. John Stoker says:

    Did you guys see Slashdot this morning!!!!

    http://slashdot.org/articles/07/01/17/0311219.shtml

    Despite 100 Million (forced) IE7 installs, Firefox STILL GAINING! Ha, take that Kool-Aid Drinkers!

    http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196901142

  93. Aedrin says:

    "Despite 100 Million (forced) IE7 installs, Firefox STILL GAINING!"

    Hmm.

    http://www.thecounter.com/stats/2006/December/browser.php

    http://www.thecounter.com/stats/2006/June/browser.php

    Yep, you’re right. After 6 months FireFox (during which IE7 was released) gained a whole percent. I’m impressed.

    "Ha, take that Kool-Aid Drinkers!"

    I believe the term is usually applied to the Firefox evangelists.

    "Did you guys see Slashdot this morning!!!!"

    Yes, including the torrent of rabbid ‘Kool-Aid Drinkers’. Normally 90% of the comments are about how yet another opinionated/biased article has been put on Slashdot, but when it is against Microsoft suddenly everyone is drooling puddles.

    Of course you get a big reaction out of throwing a piece of meat into a pit of lions.

    Also:

    "Also, at the risk of sounding like a broken record, "Webstats are unreliable"."

    A broken record is usually best disposed of.

    Of course web stats are unreliable. But if you have a big enough of a sample size and a big enough spread you can get some semi reliable numbers.

    http://www.thecounter.com/stats/2006/June/index.php

    100 million visitors

    I think that counts as a pretty decent sample size.

  94. Aedrin says:

    From the very article you mention:

    "The impact of the automatic upgrade was easy to see when compared with the much slower uptake of Firefox 2.0, the browser Mozilla introduced in October 2006."

    IE7 pushes out a new version that is greatly appreciated and downloaded by many.

    And Firefox produces version 2 that is weak in features and still a memory hog and is a little bit more bloated with useless standard addons.

    And sure, some percentage of IE7 was through Automatic Updates, but you don’t think Mozilla wish they could put Firefox 2 on their update program? (You know, just like how every single other program tells you when a new version is available) It’s one of those pits they dug for themselves. They got mad at Microsoft for having IE recommend an update. This prevents them from doing the very same thing themself.

  95. Yuri says:

    Is there a version of IE7 available for Linux?  Pleeeeze?  I am currently running Firefox on Ubuntu, but all of those comments make me think that I am probably really missing out on cool features, though I don’t quite understand what they are.  Can someone explain what the "Spyware" package does?  Is it available as .deb or would I have to spend the day compiling it from scratch?

  96. Aedrin says:

    http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196900260

    "The latter, although strictly not optional, are more intangible goals, such as "improve usability of Add-On Manager" or "simpler print preview dialog." The former, however, are more concrete, and include to-dos like "support Microsoft CardSpace" and "improve search, retrieval, and startup performance."

    Among the features currently pegged as must-haves by Mozilla for Firefox 3 are an overhaul of the browser’s bookmark system and new identity management tools. "

    Looks like Firefox 3.0 will be much like 2.0.

    Too soon and too little improvements.

    They should’ve made Firefox 2.0 be 1.6, and 3.0 looks like it will be a 1.7, maybe 1.8.

    But everyone knows the reason they went to 2 and 3, is to project an image of accomplishment, and because IE went up a major version.

  97. José Jeria says:

    Aedrin, excuse me, but don’t speak about things that you are have no clue about. Spreading ignorance is never good.

    Thanks

  98. Christopher Meacham says:

    ***I*** was installing for the third time to try to get it working. And still it didn’t work. I ended up uninstalling the third, and final, time. For some reason after the first install it cut off the first 256 characters of html on any page. On the second install it cut off the first 512 characters. On the third, 768 characters. Anybody else see the pattern? Good bye IE. I wish I could say I enjoyed having you around… but I was ecstatic when Firefox went RC1.

  99. Aaron says:

    congrats, you made a sucessful browser sucessful again… almost..

    "Yet in the three months it’s been available, Firefox’s market share has continued to grow. " -slashdot

    gotta love it right?

  100. kerminatorX says:

    Just curious, how many uninstallations of IE7 were recorded? I think IE7 is a long way from being a great web browser.

  101. Aedrin says:

    "Aedrin, excuse me, but don’t speak about things that you are have no clue about. Spreading ignorance is never good."

    Making statements without any point is never good either. Yet…

    If I am speaking about something that I have no clue about, then show me what that is.

  102. steve_web says:

    @Aedrin

    I don’t disagree that most users think the Web is the "Blue e" and thats all they understand.

    My point is that when you have a direct system in place, to spoon feed users (AU) the software you want them to install (IE7), it is very easy to get them to install it.

    *If* Firefox was in this list, it too would gain significant traction, just because it is "pushed" to the users, rather than the user having to go out of their way to get it.

    I’m not dumb, IE isn’t going to disappear off the web browser market… ever.  I just find the… "situation" to be interesting.  For the people I talk to face to face (a few hundred), that have installed Firefox, they all love it, and have never looked back.  Now since they obviously know IE already, to have made the choice to switch, they obviously found something of interest to keep them using Firefox.  If Mozilla had the marketing/OS Dominance to peddle their software with the same ability MS has, I think the overall picture today, would look a heck of a lot different, thats all.

  103. D49 says:

    While microsoft insist on making IE part of the OS it is always going to be a danger. At least with FF Opera etc I have the option to completely remove them from my system if I wish something that I cannot do with IE7.

  104. Aedrin says:

    "that have installed Firefox, they all love it, and have never looked back."

    I’ve had very non-technical users try out Firefox and they couldn’t tell a difference. Both have tabs, and they both work. I think the main factor is how technical someone is. Someone with little technical knowledge will not benefit from switching.

    The main I don’t understand is that all these developers are screaming bloody murder. Yet IE7 is an improvement over IE6, standards wise. So their work is being improved and still no one is satisfied.

    "to spoon feed users (AU) the software you want them to install (IE7)"

    I understand the anger/distress most people receive when they see IE7 being delivered through automatic update, but if it wasn’t for AU then most of these users would never update to a newer version. This is the reason why there are still users of IE4, IE5 and other browsers out there. So people complain about older browsers, and about something being done about them.

    Most who are on the Anti-Microsoft bandwagon will complain no matter what they do.

  105. Microsoft has full rights to distribute free updates from their AU system. It’s not even unethical. Unethical would be selling software with unadvertised features and then forcing users to pay to ‘unlock’ these features (Apple’s 802.11n, anyone? http://apcstart.com/4999/apple_to_slug_users_for_802_11n_enablers )

    Besides, though it seems to fall on deaf ears, IE7 is not just eye-candy. It’s a security update. Don’t believe me? Just read the blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2006/08/24/717614.aspx . And that’s only one example.

  106. @Yuri

    "Is there a version of IE7 available for Linux?  Pleeeeze?  I am currently running Firefox on Ubuntu, but all of those comments make me think that I am probably really missing out on cool features, though I don’t quite understand what they are."

    Finally, someone figures out the truth!

    "Can someone explain what the "Spyware" package does?"

    Sorry, I forget that Linux people don’t understand non-hacker programs. You see, there is no "Spyware" package with IE7.

    "Is it available as .deb or would I have to spend the day compiling it from scratch?"

    Assuming ‘it’ refers to the "Spyware package," yes, you would be able to find both a .deb and some source code. If ‘it’ refers to IE7 (poor, poor English… how they slaughter you), you are wrong both ways. Linux people wouldn’t appreciate a .deb, and Microsoft is smart enough to make an OS that doesn’t require programmer knowledge to simply install a browser (as opposed to other OS makers…).

  107. After a long wait, the newest Internet Explorer version is out, IE 7 release ( Team blog entry with download link). Without a doubt the most interesting ‘feature’ — as far as us application developers are concerned — is…

  108. Marcos says:

    Great, finally IE is feature-wise where Firefox was a year ago! I wonder how many of the 100 million were simple upgrades vs new installs, anyone?

  109. IEBlog : 100 Million IE7 Installations! IE7의 설치가 1억건을 돌파했다는 소식입니다. GPM인 Tony Chor의 이야기를 그대로 옮겨 번역해보겠습니다:

  110. Ronald says:

    If you push a mandatory update through Windows Update or Microsoft Update…. yeah right.

  111. IanL says:

    We have just started uninstalling IE7 because it stops Outlook printing Header info on certain html formated mails.  Still there’ no reason why a company would test it’s flagship email client and it’s flagship browser for compatibility before release – expecially if the release was via an auto update.

    IL  

  112. Beau says:

    So, is there any changes or hope to get IE7 for Windows 2000/S/AS (any)?

    It will be better.

  113. Anonymous says:

    After waiting and watching and hoping that this thing would die (I know I was deluding myself), Internet Explorer 7 has cracked the 100 Million Download mark. I’m curious, who are these people, and why haven’t they discovered that Firefox is better? Oh,

  114. Aedrin says:

    "Vote and Comment on this *cough* milestone at TagNe.ws"

    Not only does the person get something completely wrong (where is it stated that the 100 million = 25%), it is also ridiculous for casual visitors to have to register/log in to post a comment. It’s not a forum.

    "I’m curious, who are these people, and why haven’t they discovered that Firefox is better?"

    Because it isn’t. It’s different.

    "http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196901142

    I find this article very interesting."

    So do I. It shows how easy it is to manipulate numbers to make people believe anything. This is why opinion should never be in news.

  115. will says:

    Just wondering something.  In IE6 and IE7, when you right click on a form button, a context menu opens with 6 (and only 6) grayed out options.

    Whats the point in this?  Is there plans to add options to this menu that would be handy? or to get rid of it?

    Just saw it and realized how ugly it looked. btw I was hoping to find an option to "submit" a form to a new tab, but obviously there wasn’t one.

  116. steve_web says:

    @Aedrin,

    Just curious, what is your role in the business world? Am I right in guessing that you are a .Net/VB/ASP/C# or similar developer?

    I appreciate a good debate as much as anyone, but I must admit there seems to be a huge MS bias in your comments.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m pro-Mozilla/Opera/Safari/Konqueror/? too, but mainly for the standards support, security, features, and extensions.

  117. raoul says:

    Mmm… Is this worth a celebration? I never used to turn to Firefox as often as I do since I installed IE7. It’s slow, it slows my system, and it is still buggy.

  118. Richard says:

    "I have no hesitation in recommending people who want to use IE to upgrade to IE7 because it is a better program that IE6 and on a par with Firefox." Except that if you use Windows 2000 (or earlier) you can’t upgrade.  It is only for people with certain Micorsoft products.  So not only are users with older versions of the OS forced "to pay to ‘unlock’" the secuity fixes, but those who have a hetrogenous OS envionment can’t (by MS design) have a unifed browsing envionment.  Effectively people who have spent substantial sums on MS product are being orphaned, again.

  119. @Richard, who said

    "but those who have a hetrogenous OS envionment can’t (by MS design) have a unifed browsing envionment.  Effectively people who have spent substantial sums on MS product are being orphaned, again."

    Windows 2000… seven years old? Do you think Microsoft can just easily flip a switch to enable IE7 for 2000?

    Asking for IE7 on a Windows 2000 machine is like asking for the .NET framework for Windows 95 (as both are about seven years apart). Neither Apple nor Linux claim seven years of backwards-compatible updates; if they’re ‘so much better’, why would you expect Microsoft to do it?

  120. Frank Grimes says:

    Richard,

    Windows 2000 is 7 years old (it was released December 1999). Do you expect IE7 to be released for Windows ME too, since it was released after Windows 2000?

  121. Jon says:

    webpage failed to load or does not show correctly if i open multiple tabs like 7-10 or group tabs on favorite. I’ve

    seen so many IE 7 message: Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage. the website, connection, typing error is not the problem it’s might be IE 7

    This issue happen frequently now can you guys check this issue I’m having. I’m really tired clicking on the refreshed button all the time when i open group tabs on my favorite.

  122. Aedrin says:

    "Just curious, what is your role in the business world? Am I right in guessing that you are a .Net/VB/ASP/C# or similar developer?

    I appreciate a good debate as much as anyone, but I must admit there seems to be a huge MS bias in your comments."

    Profesionally a variety of languages (PHP, JSP, HTML/CSS and JS). Personal use is indeed C#.

    You could call it a bias. And it probably is partially. But I’m also tired of everyone bashing Microsoft. Sure, they do some bad things. But everyone does. If only people got this upset at their governments and the large corporations, then maybe something real would change.

  123. Kinaton says:

    Still has a serious DHTML bug..

    any news

  124. fred says:

    Description:

    A vulnerability has been discovered in Internet Explorer, which can be exploited by malicious people to disclose potentially sensitive information.

    The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the handling of redirections for URLs with the "mhtml:" URI handler. This can be exploited to access documents served from another web site.

  125. Richard says:

    "Windows 2000 is 7 years old"  The point is this:  intentionally or unintentionally, when you buy an MS product, you will eventually have to spend more money to continue using it.  And this applies whether or not you need "new fuctionality", because you need to interact with the rest of the world.  However if you are using Open Office or Firefox or Linux, while you may still need to upgrade, at least it won’t cost you  an arm and a leg. (And when you have a family, upgrading all their computers isn’t cheap.)

  126. Richard says:

    And further-more I can run Firefox on all the versions of MS Windows I have tried.

  127. FF says:

    thats bullshit… thats ONLY because it downloads with automatic update on windows…

    P.S. FF RULES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  128. Ben Buchanan says:

    I simply can’t avoid a mental image of Dr Evil shouting "One hundred MILLION installations…"

  129. Big Al says:

    100 million installations because it installs automatically. What about uninstalls?  Do they keep a record of that? Most users are clueless and just let Microsoft update do what it wants. Just because you have 100 million installs doesn’t mean everyone likes it.  We’re sticking to IE6 for a while. Until MS works out some of the issues and allows for better customization, especially that wreched toolbar.

  130. Aedrin says:

    "However if you are using Open Office or Firefox or Linux, while you may still need to upgrade, at least it won’t cost you  an arm and a leg. (And when you have a family, upgrading all their computers isn’t cheap.)"

    Instead, it will cost you a week or two in finding that one missing library making this one component not compile. Or this odd hardware that doesn’t seem to have a working driver.

    Two weeks, 80 hours @ $30/hr = $2400.

    Sure, usually these things don’t happen. But when they do? You’re out of luck. This doesn’t matter for those who like sitting behind their computers all night long and during the weekends.

    But some people just want to browse, play a game and talk to people. And when something doesn’t work they want to just call up and ask for a solution (especially in work situations).

    Like it’s been said many times before. Linux/OpenOffice is great for those who have a lot of time to spend on it, or are paid to do so. But not for normal computer users.

    As long as you have to compile programs and those programs have dependancies, then this will continue to be a problem.

  131. @Aedrin:

    Right on. Linux users are ALWAYS geeks, or have been forced to use Linux by a geek (note: I consider geek to be complimentary… please don’t think I’m insulting anyone). They don’t think it tough to sit for five hours fixing a typo in code.

    For a normal, average computer user, though, hours of just getting the software to work doesn’t cut it. They’re more willing to use software that installs cleanly and just works, even if the css support or dhtml or whatever isn’t completely right.

    Beware, O Linux afficionado. To be recognized by the masses, you must program for the masses.

  132. @Richard:

    "And further-more I can run Firefox on all the versions of MS Windows I have tried."

    Possible, because, Microsoft tries to make its primary API’s backwards compatible. Did you notice, though, that to run Firefox on Linux (it’s primary OS), you have to have kernel 2.2.14, which came out around 1999-2000.

    http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/system-requirements.html

    http://edge-op.org/files/kernel-timeline

    That’s a little bit farther back than IE goes, but not much.

  133. SurrealLogic says:

    Does anyone have any idea why IE7 flickers so badly on Vista? I just installed a clean Vista Ultimate, patched completely, and IE7 flickers like crazy. It gets worse on Flash animations and mouse overs, but doesn’t completely go away when I uninstalled flash. I’ve installed the latest ATI drivers for my card (ATI RADEON x300/x550 if I recall correctly). I’ve tried playing with the smooth scrolling options, but still, the same horrendous flickering. Any thoughts?

  134. SurrealLogic says:

    As a followup, I’m pretty sure it’s an IE7 on Vista Ultimate issue. Firefox on Vista Ultimate doesn’t flicker at all (even with Flash installed), and IE7 on Vista Enterprise didn’t flicker at all either. I’ve tried Windows Update, but it says I’m completely up to date. Any ideas?

  135. A simple end user who would like 2 features in IE7 fixed. says:

    PLEASE FIX the following:

    1. Each time IE7 is opened, the value of the "Width" entry in registry key

    HKU*user*SoftwareMicrosoftInternet ExplorerLinksExplorer

    automatically increments by 1 !!

    Stop this crazyness.

    2. Please make IE7 remember the previous PIN STATUS after the FAVORITE CENTER is closed.

    Each time favorite center is closed then reopen, it will be back to

    non-pined state regardless if it was pinned before or not. It either should be remembered by default or at least an option somewhere to have it remembered would help.

    Thank you!

  136. 3lish4 says:

    Hmm… I really do not understand why would people want FireFox as their primary web browser. I really, really do not understand it. Is it so good? I was using IE6, then I heard about Firefox. I used it for 20 minutes in my life and I do not want it anymore.

    The reason? I couldn’t get ‘into’ that user experience. It’s so awful. But when I used IE7, I can really get into That user experience, even though the refresh and stop button changed their places. IE7 is great, it looks so cool, unlike ff2 which is  so so brownish.

  137. Danny S says:

    > Hmm… I really do not understand why would people want FireFox as their primary web browser.

    > I couldn’t get ‘into’ that user experience.

    Well, that’s actually the reason. Most people who switched from IE to any other browser tried it and concluded it’s better for them. Tastes are different.

    Please don’t dislike me because I browse with Fx. I don’t dislike you because you’re happy with IE :-)

  138. Isaac says:

    For those people who don’t get their comments posted, please go to http://liveside.net, it seems that there’s a place useful where they would listen and make a difference.

  139. Isaac says:

    Well I didn’t make it in my last post to IE blog. I filled it some links that offer some criticisms to IE and somehow it got filtered out. I didn’t save my blog so I lost it and felt completely disheartened to write again. I decided to write once again, but if it get filtered then I will never post back and continue using FireFox.

    1. It’s valuable to have someone like Jon Udell on MS because he offers opinions that is 1. useful, 2. doesn’t carry the IE-hatred so many of us share now. So please, spend sometimes to talk with him:

    http://blog.jonudell.net/2007/01/17/rewriting-the-web-with-msie/#comment-246

  140. Isaac says:

    2. Think about features that can surpass FF and not features that ‘imitates’ it.

    Maybe this list will help:

    http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200612/10_must_haves_in_ie_next/

    One features I that FF still sucks is the RSS bookmark. That’s why people are usually Google Reader for RSS (or bloglines): because their browser sucks! I know pushing a desktop RSS reader is hard, but you already have one of your own in Dare Obasanjo. Take his RSS experience, integrate it in IE (or better yet, as a default .NET plugin!). See…

    http://www.25hoursaday.com/weblog/

    http://www.rssbandit.org/

  141. Isaac says:

    3. I’ve heard a lot of bad things about the Trident engine. Although it’s unlikely (and not possible) for you guys to use Gecko, at least re-develop the IE layout engine since it’s so vilified. IE is probably the MOST important feature for MS besides Windows and Office and since it’s the gateway to the Internet. So pour more resources in a better Trident engine!!!

  142. Isaac says:

    5. Develop IE not as a program but as a platform! Creately a configurable add-on/plug-in platform for IE and most importantly, a scripting engine (like greasemonkey). FF still has a horrible platform for developing plug-in and that’s keeping me from playing with it, although I may now the basic FF is just not good enough for my needs). Since .NET is such an integrated platform for MS, why not creating an platform for developing IE plug-in using C# or VB! The community will be thrilled since C#/VB is so much easier to code than C.

  143. Isaac says:

    4. Develop Linux/Solaris version for IE. That’s not only technologically necessary but is a conciliatory gesture to the IT community. Let’s face it, there are just situations that a user cannot run Windows. So, if a user has to choose from the best browsers available, does IE want to be in the list? And, it also stops the marginalization and conversion to FF.

  144. Isaac says:

    Yes…you CAN add add-ons on IE, just that not many people are really interested in doing that… why has IE alienated the people who would most probably create plugin and stimulate a vibrant community instead of a dormant one?

    The way i view it, IE is still a ‘dead’ system, but FF is live. See: http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/2007/01/pinocchio-problem.html

  145. Isaac says:

    6. Open sourcing IE may be an option. I will stay on the technical side on this: IE’s development time is longer than FF, and probably won’t be able to catch up unless much more resource is poured into it. I don’t know how much proprietary code is there in IE, but if you are offering it for free then at least you expect your revenue does not directly come from the sales. I think IE is more like a PR engine, open source it would show how much IE is clearer and superior to other browsers. Does the IE team have enough pride in their code to demonstrate it to the world?

    Well sorry for making many comparisons with FF. Hope my opinions can be constructive.

  146. Martin Payne says:

    Whilst I agree that the number of IE7 users is probably grossly inflated by the fact that it is distributed as a high priority update, who really cares? It’s not like Adobe Reader, J2SE, Opera, Firefox, and other software don’t do a similar thing…

    As long as people are upgrading from IE6 to IE7, I don’t mind how they do it—manual install, automatic update, or telegram from Bill Gates! Let’s just be happy that web development is becoming less of a headache!

  147. goose says:

    Hallo. Can you please make Firefox go away? I would prefer to make websites for just ONE browser. IE is the top, the best. I love IE ’cause it’s so simple and clean. It looks good, too!!!

    Firefox and Opera and Safari are boring! K-Meleon and Seamonkey are boring, too! Thank you for giving me a job fixing up computers, Microsoft! I would be in the unemployment line if it weren’t for your browser!

    I think your work is brilliant!

  148. I develop web applications from time to time, and I have to say that in the long term IE7 will make life easier for me. Come the day when there are no more CSS tricks.

    That aside, I think that IE7 is great improvement on IE6, and the team should be commended on their work.

    You need to make sure its easy to write plugins as the next step. These are important for many users.

  149. Taijiguy says:

    I installed IE7 on 2 computers, but I rolled back to IE6 the next day when, after playing around with IE7 for awhile, I found it to be a piece of crap. So don’t forget to subtract 2 from that 100 million.

  150. no one says:

    when will Ms stop copying Mozilla

  151. Serious Sam says:

    And when will people get of MSFT’s back for ‘copying’ Mozilla, I mean personally, I’d say that as long as a feature is worth copying (e.g. is very popular and makes browsing easy), then why shouldn’t a company (and I’m speaking more widely than Microsoft, here) adopt something similar within their own product.  After all, are you really suggesting that this is the only industry where copying takes place.  I would suggest that to some degree or another, it’s pretty universal.

    I would agree that it is important for MSFT to come up with some of their own ideas, which will help distinguish it from the other browsers out there.  However, I for one can’t wait for the to introduce (amongst others), things like an inbuilt spell checker, tab history (to re-open any previously closed tabs) and a restore last browsing session for if a session gets terminated unexpectedly.  Yes, I’m pretty sure these are all features already in the latest FF, but I know they would make my life much easier when using IE (which – like many people – remains my primary browser).

    Since we are on the subject of what you guys are doing next, I would just like to join the growing calls to start getting some news on IE 8, as I to have heard the reports of its possible release within 12-18 months, along with the fact that you guys already have a version in testing internally.  If that timing at least proves accurate, then now would be the time to start blogging about it, since you where talking about IE 7, for a lot longer than 12-18 months, lol.

  152. I am really disappointed by the backward step as far as zoom is concerned. The change of default behaviour to whole page zoom may appeal to designers who don’t care about accessibility. But it means that,

    ** as soon as I want to increase the size of a page (CTRL +, or, CTRL Wheel) it almost always means sideways scrolling;

    ** if I laboriously, with much mousing around, change the text size via menu option, you instantly zap it back to medium if I then use whole page zoom. This is a BUG;

    ** change text size is far too laborious and inflexible, without the precision or scope needed;

    ** and am I right in thinking that a side effect is that I can no longer zoom the text in Outlook at all????? This is a BUG. How am I supposed to read tiny type emails?

    ** when I use the zoom, change windows and come back, what I was reading has scrolled sideways partly off the screen. This is a BUG.

    ** do you not think you have any users with sight worse than that of a healthy 20 year old?

    How on earth can you be proud of this? You’ve had a discussion at http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2006/02/07/526805.aspx which makes clear what is needed. The default control needs to go back to what it was before. If people want the new zoom behaviour it should be a different control mechanism. THIS IS AN URGENT BUG FIX as well as a huge misjudgement and shouldn’t have to wait for the next major upgrade.

  153. Joe says:

    Listening to people installing and than crying about IE 7 not working it drives me nuts. Could it be user error or their PC being crap due to their maintanence of keeping a healthy and clean PC? I used IE 7 even in Beta and still out performs all other browsers. My 2 cents…

  154. Mike says:

    And on how many of these english language installs have you ignored the user’s locale setting and replaced it with English(US).

    Although bugged repeatedly through the IE7 and Vista betas, you still set the radio button defaults incorrectly on the runonce page that appears after first launching IE7. It offers the user the choice between the user’s current settings (which might be UK, Australia etc) and English(US), but always sets the defaults on the latter. This is buried in the middle of settings for anti-phishing etc and is very easy to overlook.

    Why is Microsoft determined to overwrite non-US English settings? It messes up so many website redirects!!

  155. Bob Farrell says:

    A disingenuous blog.  IE7 is pushed by Microsoft update.  What can we infer, however, from the fact that so few people have chosen to install it since it became available?

  156. David says:

    ok i dont get this i have just now got the ie7 and i dont like it the bars are all messed up and it let me pick my search engine thats ok but it put a address bar on the top right corner for it and i have a google toolbar already on my system i like it for some of the other fetures i dont want both and since the ie7 one is well nothing and i read something about they arnt concerned with making changes to the bars because no one really cares what the heck are the rest of us who dont like it have to do just suffer or go back to ie6????????

  157. bob says:

    Sorry, but IE is a HUNK of junk. You may have worked hard but you are still non standards compliant finicky, try to do all the thinking for users thereby causing them more pain oh no sorry your gonna have to click on the little flashing yellow bar (which most monkies dont ever see) jsut to have basic javascript operability grrr.. don’t believe it? Go out and ask a few website/application developers what they think of ie7. You guys have made life a living hell (again). Please please please do something about it in the next release

  158. Symtex says:

    When is the exact date of the mui pack release

    of Internet explorer 7.0 ?

    And don’t remove my post again, what did I say

    wrong ??? Just told ie7 messed up languages

    between xp pro and ie7

    "The states are for their freedom but not

    for the freedom of speech of others…"

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