IE Web Casts and Expert Chats for Web Designers and Developers


Before shipping IE7, we had regular “expert chats” where we provided you with an opportunity to ask questions and get more information about IE7 and its many features. Now that we’ve shipped, we’re going to start bringing back regular events for web developers and web designers. Every Thursday at 10am PST, we will be running either a web cast or web chat of some kind. The topics will range from CSS to RSS to HTML to add-on development, anything that you might find interesting. In fact, if you have any ideas, I encourage you to leave them as comments and we’ll try to arrange a webcast or chat around one of your suggestions. We’ll also make sure to vary the depth, for example, one week we may do an intro to a topic, and then a few weeks later, do a much deeper technical dive into that one area.

We’ve lined up speakers and sessions every Thursday through March 8th, and will schedule more in February once we’ve heard additional feedback from you.

Thanks! Hope to see you at these sessions!

PEte LePage
Senior Product Manager – IE

Date

Type

Topic

Speakers

Registration Link

1/11/2007

Web Cast

Internet Explorer 7: An Overview

Chris Wilson

register

1/18/2007

Expert Chat

Web Design (CSS, HTML)

Markus Mielke, Dave Massy, Chris Wilson

register

1/25/2007

Web Cast

Adding RSS to Your Website

Walter VonKoch

register

2/1/2007

Web Cast

The Power of IE Add-Ons

Jeremy Epling

register

2/8/2007

Web Cast

Help With Updating Your Pages to IE7

Markus Mielke

register

2/15/2007

Expert Chat

Add-On Development

Jeremy Epling, Eric Lawrence

register

2/22/2007

Web Cast

Creating Intranet Applications That Respect Protected Mode

Marc Silbey

register

3/1/2007

Web Cast

Building Add-Ons for IE

Eric Lawrence

register

3/8/2007

Web Cast

The IE Developer Toolbar

Arron Eicholtz

register

Comments (30)

  1. kturcotte says:

    I am looking for the correct place to ask this question.

    I just installed IE7 and one of the things that I noticed was that if I start IE7 with a command line specifying a file URI, it is not handled properly.

    For example:

    from the start menu select run an type

    "C:Program FilesInternet Exploreriexplore.exe" "file:///c:/IETest.html?a=4"

    This starts IE7 but the search portion of the uri is missing.

    For this to work you will need to create the file c:IEText.html that contains the following.

    <SCRIPT>

    document.write(window.location + "<br>" + window.location.search)

    </SCRIPT>

    This works correctly under IE6, and works correctly when you type the URI into the address bar, but the search portion of the URI is always lost when passed in from the command line.

    Any Thoughts?

  2. steve_web says:

    This has been asked before, but can we post questions before a chat starts, such that the experts might have a chance to return with an answer that isn’t "hmm, we’ll have to look into that"… or "we haven’t seen that before".

    Its very frustrating to chat with the "experts", to get replies about serious bugs that have plagued IE7 since day 1, containing "hmmm", "wow", "are you sure", "do you have a test case", etc.

    Better yet, please, please, please bring back a public bug tracking system… with ranking available, so you know what is bugging us most.

  3. Frank Grimes says:

    "Better yet, please, please, please bring back a public bug tracking system… with ranking available, so you know what is bugging us most."

    Agreed on the bug tracker, but is the ranking system a good idea? Whilst useful in theory, based on some of the comments based on this very blog many will simply mark all their bugs with the highest rank, regardless of how trivial they are.

  4. Sounds like a good idea. Also isn’t the current bug tracking system public?

    Feel free to delete the second post in the blog (T), it has no place here.

  5. What is a person supposed to do about existing applications that break when IE 7 is installed?

    Please read http://www.dotnetjunkies.com/WebLog/mwherman2000/archive/2007/01/06/183736.aspx

    Not impressed …tabs is not a good trade-off for broken backward compatbility

  6. walter says:

    3 things; 1, "John A. Bilicki III" the bug tracking system WAS public, but it was taken down shortly after IE7 was released (were ya’ll worried about the flood of bugs once people started using IE7???)

    2, To get around teh EOLAS patent issue, MS decided that users would have to "click" on somthing to "activate" the control (e.g. a flash movie, etc.

    I understand the lawsuit, and that MS had very few options, but, the border, on the control, suffers the same ZINDEX issue that select lists did in IE6.  I haven’t verified if this is fixed in IE7, but if not, can it be fixed right away! The border is hideous when it shows up on top of DHTML elements that appear above it.

    3, "Michael Herman (Parallelspace)", yeah you are right, there were a lot of things broken by IE7, in the name of progress.  I don’t agree one bit, that they needed to break, but they did.  I got word from an MS developer that there was a patch coming soon, that would fix a lot of these issues (in particular, the 50+ tabs in IE7 causing all kinds of grief across Windows) I’m not sure if this patch includes fixes for the HP scanner or not, but lets hope it does!!

  7. Hello,

    IE7 still has to fix many documented, nicely reported, confirmed with testcases, well explained bugs of all sorts. Many of them have been reported at msdn’s wiki channel 9 more than 2 years ago.

    Absence/dysfunctionality of Microsoft’s public bug reporting system is largely compensated by lots and lots of web designers and/or web standards groups creating web-accessible testcases and webpages demonstrating the IE7 bugs and flaws. So there is *_no excuse_* here for not fixing CSS bugs, HTML 4 bugs, DOM 2, correcting incorrect implementations in CSS2.1, DOM2 and HTML 4, supporting unsupported features in CSS2.1, HTML4, DOM2, etc.. in IE7.5

    Again, there is *_no excuse_* anymore.

    Please

    – fix the alt versus title tooltip implementation

    – implement disabled attribute for option/optgroup

    – support <q>

    – implement Site Navigation toolbar

    – implement implicit version of <label>

    – etc..

    Fix CSS bugs, prioritizing

    – bugs that creates important problems like crash and cpu maxed due to infinite loop: those are serious bugs which should be addressed first. Yes, there are bugs like that! The MADD (Magical Act of Disapearing Divs) bug reported by

    John A. Bilicki III (http://www.jabcreations.com/) on September 2nd 2006 at IE Blog does that in IE7 final!

    – Fix the many collapsing adjoining margins (see section 8.3.1 of CSS 2.1): it’s now crystal clear that this stops several columnar layout from working as expected and those bugs are major headaches for web developers because other excellent-compliant browsers don’t behave like IE7.

    – Fix float implementation: float bugs are numerous, well reported and well documented by a lot of people now. Many people use or rely on float to create columnar layouts.

    – Fix the CSS 1 tests that IE7 fails. That’s right: CSS 1 tests. Visit my site for precise testcases

    – Fix z-index: visit http://www.aplus.co.yu/css/z-pos/index2.php

    Wrong z-index implementation bugs by Aleksandar Vacić

    – Fix CSS position-related bugs: there are still bugs related to position in IE7.

    – Fix CSS inline box model bugs: e.g. a parent inline element should not grow, should not stretch because of its inline nested child.

    – Fix all of the background (background-image, background-color) related bugs

    – Fix the inherit and inheritance related bugs

    Implement UAAG 1.0 guidelines:

    Allow users to override some specific HTML attributes which are known to limit accessibility of content, to restrict accessibility and usability: noresize, target, frameborder, scrolling. UAAG 1.0 on Making Frames accessible is crystal clear on this when it says: In order to ensure that content is accessible, allow the user to override some attributes of the FRAME element of HTML 4 noresize, scrolling, and frameborder. HTML 4.01, Section 16.3.2 Target semantics says ‘User agents may provide users with a mechanism to override the target attribute.’ Already Netscape 7+, Mozilla 1.x and Firefox 1.x all allow users to override these specific attributes.

    Gérard

  8. Tino Zijdel says:

    The Expert Chat on 18/1 might just be interesting although I have a feeling that questions about standards-compliance will again be evated and that again recommendations wil be made for non-standards solutions just because IE’s implementations are broken still in IE7 and Microsoft has no intention to ‘fix the web’. You are just playing chicken…

  9. Dave says:

    Can you put dates in the international YYYY-MM-DD format please?

    In Europe we use DD/MM/YYYY and in the US they use the weird MM/DD/YYYY, so to avoid confusion use international forms please.

    Why is the date format in the US so retarded? It makes sense to order the figures in order of significance.

  10. Tony says:

    @ Dave, when you spell your dates do you write it as 7th January, 2006 or do you write it as January 7th, 2006? Personally I’ve always seen it as the latter. Thus MM/DD/YYYY. Even in the international format month is listed prior to day. So what makes sense to you may not make sense to everyone else.

    Will unedited transcripts for each of the casts/chats be available?

  11. rc says:

    It is totally obvious that Microsoft is NOT interested in fixing bugs and improving standards support in IE. Microsoft company has its own goals and achieves them quite successfully. So all "bug reporting" comments look funny and ignorant.

  12. Tino Zijdel says:

    @Tony: In the Netherlands we actually write "7 januari 2007"

  13. Bill says:

    I’m not a web designer or developer but I try to follow this blog just to have an idea as to what’s going on with IE.  Having said that, I thought this might be an opportune time to throw out a request to all of you who are developers and designers.  With the proliferation of mobile devices, specifically Tablet PC’s and now the Ultra Mobile PC’s (UMPC) there’s one feature I’d love to see given a high priority.  That’s the ability to have left-side scroll bars.  Being left-handed and using a Tablet PC daily, I LOVE the way OneNote supports this feature so I don’t have to try and look through my arm when scrolling down a page.  Ideally, I’d like to have this capability throughout the Operating System, but as a start if there’s a way to add this capability to IE like the OneNote team did, that would be such a big plus.

    Thanks for listening!

    –Bill

  14. Upanisad says:

    Talking aobut the IE DevToolBar. Is it going to be updated anytime soon?

    And, BTW, on the toolbar download page I read: "This Beta 3 version of the toolbar contains…. Style Tracer: Right mouse click on a style value for an element and select Style Tracer to find the style rule that is effecting that value. Selector Matches…. etc..".

    Where are these tools???? I’ve installed the bar on 2 different installations, with IE6 and IE7, but none of the reported Beta 3 update tools seems to exist! Is it really just the Beta 2 that you can download? And where has the Beta 3 gone, then?

  15. Hello,

    Microsoft plans 3 cast/chats on IE add-ons. Personally, I do not see add-ons as a priority at this time. Fixing bugs, correcting incorrect implementations that have been reported, confirmed during 3, 4, 5+ years should be a priority.

    "Web Design (CSS, HTML)" January 18th expert chat and "Help With Updating Your Pages to IE7" February 8th web cast can be good, useful (tech evangelism) for amateur web designers. But frankly, if you want to improve the quality, interoperability of webpage designs, Microsoft should just remove any/all versions of MS-Front Page from its download servers.

    "Microsoft doesn’t use FrontPage to create pages on Microsoft.com — even the pages discussing FrontPage. If Microsoft doesn’t use it, why should you?"

    14AFFrontPage; The Biggest Web Design Mistakes of 2004

    http://www.webpagesthatsuck.com/biggest-web-design-mistakes-in-2004-part2.html

    Microsoft has been promoting a website development product for others that it has denied to itself during many years, that it actively refused for itself: a totally illogical, inconsequent, incoherent behavior. A sort of miserable double talk situation.

    The latest MS-Expression Web Designer does not have a built-in embedded SGML validator nor an built-in HTML Tidy: those tools are useful+relevant for both creating new webpages or upgrading old webpages. Some settings in MS-Expression Web Designer still promotes hacks, non-standard markup code. If Microsoft is looking to improve the web design on the web, then those aforementioned issues are simple goals/tasks to tackle/do. MS-Expression Web Designer is still far from meeting several ATAG 1.0 guidelines.

    Implement a built-in Webpage Quality indicator icon in the browser:

    Implement a feature which will report back to the user if a page uses valid code, has markup errors and/or parsing CSS errors: some sort of a Webpage Quality indicator icon (smiley or green check for valid page, frown or red ‘X’ when invalid) on the statusbar (or somewhere else) which when clicked would report more info to the user and give him more options among which one would be to validate the page with the World Wide Web Consortium validator.

    Amaya does that for CSS parsing errors; Icab does that; Firefox reports CSS parsing errors and can report more errors thanks to a validator add-on; Dillo does that; Opera 9 does all that.

    That’s one mean to help improve webpage design for/by amateur web designers.

    I already explained my idea more than 2 years ago at

    http://channel9.msdn.com/wiki/default.aspx/Channel9.InternetExplorerFeatureRequests

    and at

    http://channel9.msdn.com/wiki/default.aspx/Channel9.InternetExplorerBugs

    MS-Expression Web Designer does not have a built-in validator but has a Compatibility (markup code and CSS code) checkers to make code comply with IE6 in its default setting. Again, there are other web browsers out there and *_they_* are much more web-standards-compliant than IE6!

    CSS compatibility should only offer options CSS 1 and CSS 2.1: there is nothing else really that would be or should be recommendable.

    Checking CSS compatibility with IE6 when using MS-Expression is non-sense, is promotion of bad web design (because of a faulty rendering engine) and promoting the perpetuation of website design based on IE bugs and incorrect implementations.

    Silent recovery from errors is harmful; browsers and webpage authoring tools which recover from error by making a choice without the user’s consent are not acting on the user’s behalf but are insidiously acting against and despite the users.

    Gérard

  16. Drew says:

    Sorry if this is off-topic. The comments seem to be primarily focused on flames and feature requests. I don’t have either.

    Will these webcasts be available to download and watch after they first happen? If so, when/where can we find out about them?

    I don’t really want to subscribe to this post’s comments (too much noise), so could you please let us know about it in another blogpost?

    Thanks.

  17. David William Wrixon says:

    Dates are bloody annoying especially the US format.

    The International system is rational because you can sort by date.

    If you sort on any other system all you create is confusion.

    I would have felt that anyone involved with computers would seek that level of rationality.

  18. Chris says:

    Sorry for being off-topic, but the lack of a bug-reporting database leads me to post these issues here:

    Good: I found the source of the IE7 weird scrolling effect (where the page can carry on scrolling, or jump in the wrong direction etc). Turns out to be a clash with Logitech Mouse software. Once that is removed, scrolling is normal in IE7.

    Bad: what’s happened to IE7 on Windows automatic updates? We had it on one machine, it started downloading on another, but then all the PCs were reinstalled. Since then it hasn’t come through. How will people ever upgrade? I did my PC manually.

  19. steve_web says:

    Agreed with the date issue.

    YYYY-MM-DD is the only format that is sortable, easily understood, regardless of user origin.

    Otherwise, put in a name…

    March 1, 2007 – "Building Add-Ons for IE"

    On the "ins’t it ironic" note, why is the IE Developer Toolbar the last item on the list, when (if it is the great tool MS claims it to be) it could be helpful for users trying to convert their sites over to IE7, and understand the changes that have taken place.

    Otherwise, I look forward to the chats.

    If you’re curious to my first question on January the 11th, 2007 it will be:

    "Seriously, when is the public bug tracking system coming back online?  This should be your #1 priority, now that IE7 is being pushed on the market.  It was considered hilariously funny that it shut down when IE7 was released, but that joke is getting really old, fast."

  20. Aedrin says:

    "Even in the international format month is listed prior to day. So what makes sense to you may not make sense to everyone else."

    No, it is not. It is also in order of significance (year, month and date, big to small).

    "Microsoft plans 3 cast/chats on IE add-ons. Personally, I do not see add-ons as a priority at this time. Fixing bugs, correcting incorrect implementations that have been reported, confirmed during 3, 4, 5+ years should be a priority."

    These are YOUR priorities. Not everyone elses.

    There are more people using the internet other than Web Developers.

    "Implement a feature which will report back to the user if a page uses valid code, has markup errors and/or parsing CSS errors: some sort of a Webpage Quality"

    And users need to care about this, why? Do you want to feel more important?

    "14AFFrontPage; The Biggest Web Design Mistakes of 2004"

    Really? An old product is deemed not good? Where’s the article, ‘DOS: The biggest GUI disaster of 2007’?

    I haven’t seen a WYSIWYG editor that outputs decent HTML.

    "Seriously, when is the public bug tracking system coming back online?  This should be your #1 priority, now that IE7 is being pushed on the market.  It was considered hilariously funny that it shut down when IE7 was released, but that joke is getting really old, fast."

    Contrary to popular.. hope?, MS is not a public company, nor run by volunteers.

    Don’t you think there is a reason it is closed? If they open it now, everyone will start flooding it because it is cool. There will be thousands of reports in there, 50% duplicates, 49% unwarrented flames, and maybe 1% legit ones. Since there is no point in going through all of those reports, they will ignore them anyway. What does that improve for you?

    The joke that is getting old really fast is you constantly complaining with the same old thing. If you have so many bugs, and problems. Why don’t you make a website with testcases, and get it known. They use popular websites with IE testcases, as it is a good indication of what is important to fix. Not what you find important to fix.

  21. @Aedrin

    >> Fixing bugs, correcting incorrect

    >> implementations that have been

    >> reported, confirmed during 3, 4, 5+ >> years should be a priority."

    > These are YOUR priorities.

    Those should be Microsoft’s priorities for the next MSIE. Add-ons should not be put in front of fixing bugs reported 3+ years ago.

    >> "Implement a feature which will

    >> report back to the user if a page

    >> uses valid code, has markup errors

    >> and/or parsing CSS errors: some

    >> sort of a Webpage Quality"

    > And users need to care about this,

    > why?

    Users should not *_necessarly_* need to care about this  – although it certainly could help them reporting problems when emailing the webmaster of a site – but web authors should. I’m not requesting about a rare or sophisticated feature here but for one that several other browsers have already implemented and a feature that several W3C documents recommend and support.

    > An old product is deemed not good?

    MS-Front Page has been around for years (since 1998) and has contributed to the creation of millions of webpages that do not degrade well, that do not interoperate well, that are bloated with MS-code, extra code, invalid markup code, invalid CSS code. And it’s still available, downloadable, used around. DOS, on the other hand, does not have any significative impact on the present, either on the web or internet.

    In that perspective, a new authoring tool (like MS-Expression Web Designer) should have a built-in HTML Tidy and a real SGML validator so that old webpages developed with MS-FrontPage can be upgraded. That such MS-Expression Web Designer would also meet more ATAG 1.0 guidelines is desirable.

    > The joke that is getting old really

    > fast is you constantly complaining

    > with the same old thing.

    You are unneedlessly abrasive and misunderstanding a few issues. Microsoft publicly acknowledged and confirmed it did nothing to improve the IE rendering engine during years (fall 2001 to summer 2004): we (web standards groups and web designers who tried to report bugs, incorrect implementations) are not dreaming this up.

    > If you have

    > so many bugs, and problems. Why

    > don’t you make a website with

    > testcases, and get it known. They

    > use popular websites with IE

    > testcases, as it is a good

    > indication of what is important to

    > fix. Not what you find important to > fix.

    Many people already have done IE testcases 2 years ago (@channel9 wiki feedback pages), often more than 3 years ago (Ian Hixie, richinstyle.com, PPKoch, positioniseverything.net, R. Lionheart, etc, etc.). Everything was public, accessible, explained, documented in broad daylight. Lots of webpages done by web designers (and web standards groups) have already done all that … and at the request (June 17th 2004) of Microsoft itself. So, we’re not wrong here, when requesting to fix bugs, to correct incorrect DOM/CSS/HTML implementations, to comply with web standards.

    Gérard

  22. steve_web says:

    @Aedrin,

    I think you are missing the point with the bug tracking.

    Microsoft have made some commitments to be transparent about development, and forthcoming with information about IE’s developments.

    2005-02 (February)

    "http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/02/15/373104.aspx&quot;

    There was lots of requests from MSIE developers for us to test our sites, test the browser, and report bugs.

    Now, they had "Feedback", which although it was lackluster as a bug tracking system, it did at least *exist*.

    However it has since been removed.

    Now, I can go cry, make my own site, track issues there, but that helps no one but me.

    If however, I contribute, to a central repository, that Microsoft has ownership of, then they can control it.  There will be *one* central spot where *anybody* can submit bugs to.  As a user, if I discover that "doing [X], while pressing [Y], causes [Z]" then I can report it.  If I find out (while reporting, that this was already known, then I can track its progress… I can see if there is a workaround (even a temp one).

    Better yet, since I test a *LOT* of "intense" DOM/JavaScript/CSS functionality daily, I can be one of those developers that actually contributes a lot to such a system, provide workarounds for those suffering the same problems, and even isolate test cases for Microsoft, so that they can pinpoint the problem faster, and turn out a fix quickly.

    As a company, Microsoft should be honored, that so many people are interested in helping them find the problems, and fix them.  The community will find the more exotic of bugs, much more readily than in-house testers, since our scope of work is so much different.

    (Best of all, its "free" reporting for them)

    The main issue I see, is that of a public image.  IE takes a lot of heat in the market, and likewise thus does Microsoft.  A little proverbial Olive Branch to the developer community (cough, cough, also the most vocal) to provide that 2 way communication into future developments, goes a heck of a long way, in keeping the mases happy.

    For example, I hate that the button element in IE is broken.  By far it is one of my biggest groans when I think about coding for IE.  But if I got word that they plan to provide a fix/implementation like "…" targeted for IEx, then cool, I’m happy, I know that something is being done about it.

    But what ticks me off, is when things get brought up, over and over, and the response is… what bug?  or  "maybe we will look at that for a future release" I feel like I’ve been given the brush off (as does the whole community).

    I don’t expect Microsoft to ever make any part of IE public… but being in 2 way communication with the developer community should be.

    There are folks that are anti-Mozilla (for reasons I don’t fathom, but thats another story), but with Mozilla, you can register a bug, track it, vote for it, provide test cases, and even a patch!

    As a developer, if someone not only found a bug in my software, but pinpointed the issue (test case), and offered the code to fix it, why on earth would I not want this!

    steve

  23. Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis says:

    Aedrin (on whether IE needs a bug tracker):

    "Don’t you think there is a reason it is closed? If they open it now, everyone will start flooding it because it is cool. There will be thousands of reports in there, 50% duplicates, 49% unwarrented flames, and maybe 1% legit ones. Since there is no point in going through all of those reports, they will ignore them anyway. What does that improve for you?"

    So basically you’re saying Microsoft shouldn’t implement a bug tracker because of the likelihood that people would use it. Somehow Sun, Mozilla, OpenOffice.org, and Debian all manage to cope with the problem posed by popularity.

    In any case, my experience with the now closed Connect bug tracker was that it was remarkably flame and duplicate free. (Maybe Microsoft had some people working full time on keeping it so, I don’t know.)

    Frank Grimes (on bug ranking systems):

    "is the ranking system a good idea? Whilst useful in theory, based on some of the comments based on this very blog many will simply mark all their bugs with the highest rank, regardless of how trivial they are."

    I agree. It’s too difficult for reporters to assess the importance of their own bug. What they can usefully do is:

    1. Place their own bug into broader categories (e.g. security, user interface, markup support, styling support, scripting support, etc.), which will help developers prioritize. (Obviously, even as a developer infuriating by standards support issues on a daily basis, I recognize that security bugs are more important.) For this sort of system to work, it’s important to make these categories simple (the ones used by the WebKit and Mozilla trackers are too complicated I think). Categorization would also allow interested users to subscribe by category, expanding the pool of people to confirm and provide workarounds for bugs.

    2. Confirm other people’s bug reports, as per Bugzilla (used by Mozilla) and Launchpad (the tracker used by Ubuntu).

    3. Vote on their own and other people’s bugs (as with the now closed Connect tracker and with the OpenOffice.org tracker), at a rate of one vote per user per bug. I don’t think it’s helpful to restrict the number of bugs people can vote.

    If you did wish to include a ranking system however, I suppose you could allow people who have submitted more bugs and confirmations to vote more than once for the same bug.

    Aedrin and Gérard Talbot (on reporting markup and stylesheet errors):

    User agents should not silently correct errors in markup and stylesheet, but should instead report them in an unobtrusive manner (e.g. an icon in the status bar) because:

    1) Most "users" are now also content producers (e.g. commenting on blogs), and so the distinction between authors who need to care about errors and users who don’t is a bit artificial. I believe some have taken to calling this basic principle "Web 2.0" or something. 😉

    2) Corruption in markup and stylesheets can result in a failure in communication of which the reader/viewer might wish to be aware. For example, the author might have meant to style an element "blue" or markup a table correctly to indicate something, but failed.

    3) Most users will ignore errors that user agents report, just as they largely ignore the security warnings with which user agents bombard them. But just as site authors do not ignore security warnings, neither will site authors ignore markup and stylesheet error messages.

    A little unhappy face in the Internet Explorer status bar warning of markup and stylesheet errors would do more to promote non-corrupt markup and accurate styling than the padlock ever did to ensure real security.

  24. hAl says:

    US dates are anoying.

    hAl

    11-01-2007, The Netherlands

  25. Nicole says:

    The link to IE 7, An Overview brings up an incomplete recorded webcast: History of IE and a tour around IE7, Event ID: 1032324046.  Will that be fixed?

  26. john wyatt says:

    my comment is i like ie 7  once i found out that i could go to tools then click on menu bar that will make like the old ie6 it worked for  me good luck thanks for listening john wyatt

  27. john wyatt says:

    my comment is i like ie 7  once i found out that i could go to tools then click on menu bar that will make like the old ie6 it worked for  me good luck thanks for listening john wyatt

  28. Bill Higgins says:

    Is there a transcript for the Chris Wilson chat?

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