IE7 Tech Articles Have Been Updated


To help you prepare for the IE7 release we’ve updated many of our tech articles on MSDN including those on Protected Mode, ActiveX Security and CSS Compatibility. You’ll find more sample code, more examples, and best practices for scenarios that you’ve brought to us this year.

As an example, Protected mode changes the way IE opens because it needs to create both low and medium integrity processes, IExplore.exe at low and IEUser.exe at medium. If your application opens and closes IE, you’ll want to maintain a handle to the IExplore.exe process even when it’s running with low integrity in Protected Mode. In Windows Vista Beta 2 this means you have to create a low integrity process or search through all open process to get a handle to IExplore.exe at low. To make this change easier for you, we created IELaunchURL() in Windows Vista RC1, which helps you get a handle to IE’s process across integrity levels. For more details, check out “Launching and Navigating a Protected Mode Process” in the Protected Mode article.

Marc Silbey
Program Manager

PS: If you’re interested in UAC and ActiveX, I’d encourage you to check out the ActiveX Installer Service Video on the UAC Blog

edit: Adjustment to links

Comments (47)

  1. CloneZero says:

    Your links are all bad, they point me to your webmail server.  

  2. hongson says:

    come on, at least,

    test the darn links before you post.

  3. ieblog says:

    The links are fixed.

  4. ieblog says:

    The IE Blog was recently migrated to a new server which may have caused the links glitch. The issue is being investigated to avoid this in the future. Thanks.

  5. Rex says:

    When is the window.prompt() going to get fixed?!

    There are 4 problems with it.

    1.) There is now an un-necsesary security warning.

    2.) The message size is severely restricted (only 2 lines of up to 62 characters.

    3.) The position is "top-left" instead of the correct placement "middle-center"

    4.) The buttons should be like all normal dialogs in Windows, with the buttons centered on the bottom.

    Thanks,

    rex

  6. Arnold says:

    So IE7 Final is going to be about this month??? please …come on spill the beans!

  7. cj says:

    the css compatibility page still reads that it was last updated in july.

  8. For our new site, I use a behavior for apply an over on menu making with "ul" and "li" and "div" for IE6.

    Ex.:

    <style type="text/css" media="screen">

    #menu { behavior:url("/_includes/csshover2.htc"); }

    </style>

    Now, with IE7 is it possible to have an over on a DIV ?

    If you want to view what I said : http://www.mri.gouv.qc.ca/index.asp

    The top menu and the left menu don’t pop.

  9. Lance Leonard (MSFT) says:

    CJ>> the css compatibility page still reads

    CJ>> that it was last updated in july.

    This is because the recent update only fixed a couple of small typographic errors, as opposed to changing the underlying content of the article.

    FWIW, the "tpyos" that were fixed were:

    — A conditional comment example accidentally left out some important spaces ("lt IE 7" was accidentally posted as "ltIE7").

    — In the text following that example, the name of a CSS file was not spelled correctly.

    Hope this helps…

    — Lance

  10. Martin T says:

    Could you please host theese pages, on a website that don’t require internet explore, for any usefull navigation(Navigating that site in any other browser, is almost imposible, due to the use of something that is not quite html(Ironic for a website about html compability)).

    We are some who need to support ie7 without actuelly having it installed.

  11. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    The four items you’ve identified related to window.prompt are by-design.  

    It’s pretty straightforward to use showModalDialog if you’d like to have more options for formatting of your prompt.

  12. Greg says:

    I decided to take advantage of your IE7 support phone number the other day.  I asked the lady if the list of sites in the Restricted Sites zone in the Security tab were placed there by Microsoft, and she said "probably."  Not very helpful.. did you guys put all those sites that I see in restricted sites?

    I also managed to get a virus the other day from (as far as I know) browsing on IE7 RC1.  The JS/Exploit-BO.gen (McAfee).  The wierd thing was that it was found in a folder called "Content.IE5".  Whats up with that?

  13. Venkat says:

    Hi,

    I am using the following script to open a URL in the same window.

    <HTML>

    <HEAD>

    <TITLE>Test</TITLE>

    <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html">

    <script LANGUAGE="JavaScript">

    <!–

    function UrlRedirect()

    { this.location.href =

    ("http://localhost/Test2/Default.asp?fromShortcut=yes&quot;); }

    </script>

    </HEAD>

    <BODY BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" text="#c0c0c0" topmargin="0" onload="UrlRedirect()">

    </BODY>

    </HTML>

    I have created a short cut menu for this file say Redirect.html, When user

    clicks on short cut this page opens and redirects to Test2/default.asp in the        

    same window. This was working in IE 6.0 and in IE7.0 in all the Operating

    Systems except on Vista RC1.

    I have tried the following script also and facing the same problem

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Test</title>

    <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=http://www.msn.co.in"&gt;

    <meta name="keywords" content="automatic redirection">

    </head>

    <body>

    </body>

    </html>

    I have tried the following script too and this also opens in a new window

    instead of the same window

    <html>

    <head>

    <title>Test 3</title>

    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">

    <!–

    window.location="http://www.msn.co.in&quot;;

    // –>

    </script>

    </head>

    <body>

    </body>

    </html>

    Please let me know how can I modify the script to open the redirected URL in

    the same window & tab. The above behavior i sobserved in Vista RC 1 with IE 7+

    Thanks in advance

  14. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Greg: IE does not put any sites in the restricted zone.  It’s possible that you installed another application which placed them there.

    The "Content.IE5" folder is the name of the folder which contains temporary files from the internet.  That said, just because your AV program found it doesn’t mean that IE is vulnerable to the exploit; your AV program just recognizes the ~attempt~ to exploit IE.

    @Venkat: The reason that you’re seeing a new window open is most likely that the original page you’re opening is in your local machine zone (look at the zone indicator at the bottom right) which does not run in protected mode IE.  When you navigate the page, it goes out of the local machine zone into the Internet or Intranet zone, which requires protected mode and hence opens a new window.  

    You can use the Mark of the Web to put your original page into the Internet Zone and avoid this issue.  See http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/03/07/388992.aspx for more info on the Mark of the Web.

  15. Robert says:

    Hi

    I am using IE 7 beta and get this error sometimes:

    "stack overflow at line: 0"

    This is a well known problem with IE 6 and before…

    Is anyone going to get round to fixing it?

    I dont get it with Firefox?

  16. Lena says:

    @ErikLaw:

    "The four items you’ve identified related to window.prompt are by-design."

    You’re not serious are you? Are you telling the developers of the world that your bugs are "by design"?!

    Rex is onto something here; "USEABILITY"  It is one of the most broken parts of Internet Explorer, and why all the other browsers are getting so much attention.

    As a developer myself, I have avoided using the prompt() dialog, because I can’t provide enough information in the dialog to inform the user what they are supposed to enter!

    As a professional, I would not suggest using the showModalDialog as a workaround to the bug either, because showModalDialog is not a standard JavaScript dialog. Using it means that all other users will not see the dialog, which therefore renders it useless.

    Rex also mentioned the positioning. I have to agree with him, it always bothered me, that this dialog did not behave like all the others, and was never in sync with other browsers.

    The buttons on the right, are okay, however once the dialog is fixed to include more room vertically for content, it would be logical to move them to the bottom, and centered, as they will look very much out of place with long messages.

    I didn’t know there was a security warning on the prompt() dialog! when did this happen? I don’t think I have ever seen this before?  Is it per site, for example, can I turn it on for site a, but off for site b?

    Wait a second, i have to go check this out. Anyone have a site that shows this in action?  Why would there be a security warning on a prompt dialog?  It can’t access any special settings can it? I thought it just returned a string?

    OMG!? What have you done?! You’ve broken the prompt() thing alltogether?!?!?

    Go Here in IE7 RC:

    http://www.pageresource.com/jscript/jprompt.htm

    There is a link, on the page, to open another window, that calls the prompt() dialog.

    I see now that IE7 blocks it, with a security bar.

    BUT! even if I allow the prompt() by choosing the "temporarily allow" option, it still won’t show up?

    Please fix this asap, I have to go check all my sites now to see if this is broken everywhere. Damn, wasn’t this stuff tested!?

  17. Lena says:

    Arghghghghghgh!!!

    This is messed up! Kudo’s to rex for finding this bug!

    Please let us know when the next patch will be out for this. Some of my sites will not work now.

    Also, I can temporarily over ride this, but how do I tell it to always allow?  If I allow a site to open a prompt() once, then I want to let it always.

    I still don’t get what the security bar is even on this for? What is the security hole it is patching?

  18. Lena says:

    Ok, so Google is pointing me to this page when I search for stuff on prompt().

    http://secunia.com/multiple_browsers_dialog_origin_vulnerability_test/

    In Ie7, it fails. Is this why there is a security bar? If so, whatever it is trying to fix, isn’t fixed. It just broke more stuff.

    Does the prompt dialog actually call some other dialog internally in IE that is insecure? Is this why there is a security warnig?

    Thank god this is still a beta

  19. I am seeking an answer for the following question for quite a while:

    How to create an IE instance in a separate (new) process and automate it afterwards?

    CoCreateInstance unfortunatly reuses exising IE processes for creating the new instance. So how can I create a new IE process (not thread!) and control the IWebBrowser2 object afterwards?

    Thanks!

  20. Travis [MSFT] says:

    @"Rex is onto something here; "USEABILITY"  It is one of the most broken parts of Internet Explorer, and why all the other browsers are getting so much attention."

    We are aware of the useability issues. However, given limited time and resources, some items that we would have loved to fix (like the "find" dialog, etc.) had to wait for a future release.

    @"As a professional, I would not suggest using the showModalDialog as a workaround to the bug either, because showModalDialog is not a standard JavaScript dialog. Using it means that all other users will not see the dialog, which therefore renders it useless."

    Granted, showModalDialog is not a "standard" method, but neither is "prompt", "alert", or "confirm"! It just so happens that those methods were also adopted by other browsers for compatibility with IE. Rather than use showModalDialog, for example, Firefox went with "openDialog" instead.

    @"I didn’t know there was a security warning on the prompt() dialog! when did this happen? I don’t think I have ever seen this before?  Is it per site, for example, can I turn it on for site a, but off for site b?"

    The security warning went in for Beta 3. It consequently broke* some Live mail, Gmail, and a few popular blogger apps’ functionality. The security prompt was not designed to save state for a single site, or to act like the popup blocker (with per-site settings). We will most likely extend the security warning with this functionality in the future.

    *The Information bar’s default state is to cause a page refresh when selecting an option (to ensure that a page’s state is consistent after we block a feature, for example. However, window.prompt was found primarily to occur in response to a user action (rather than onload, for example). Thus, if we refreshed on a user action, we destroyed all previous state (like the contents of a half-finished email). So, we stopped refreshing the page–the known problem here is that websites that fire window.prompt inline or onload will not be refreshed, and thus the code to trigger the prompt will not be re-run. The only current solution in this situation is to fire the prompt on a user event (that can be repeated after temporarily allowing the prompts).

    A second known issue is that we accept the "cancel" option of the dialog when we block it–this causes some pages to branch down an error codepath (based on the null return value) when they weren’t expecting it.

    @"Please let us know when the next patch will be out for this. Some of my sites will not work now."

    The current state of this behavior (as seen in RC1) is the way we designed it for IE7. If we decide to take a change, it will be in a future release (not patched).

    @"Also, I can temporarily over ride this, but how do I tell it to always allow?  If I allow a site to open a prompt() once, then I want to let it always."

    I mentioned that we didn’t design the prompt to have per-site settings. However, the security feature can be disabled on a per-zone basis. In IE’s security settings [for the Internet zone] look up "Allow websites to ask for information using scripted windows".

    @"I still don’t get what the security bar is even on this for? What is the security hole it is patching?"

    As you discovered, the secunia article discusses spoofing the user based on a lack of dialog origin. Variations on this theme were the motivation behind this security mitigation. However, we had a few other reasons, which I won’t discuss in depth, but the bulk of them are usability issues that we didn’t have resources to fix, so we opted to block the dialog itself by default: site branding/customization, text limitations (as you mentioned), insecure text entry (commonly spoofed as a password field). We appreciate the feedback posted here on simple things we can update in future versions to improve the experience.

    -Travis

  21. steve_web says:

    For Travis, and the whole thread on the window.prompt() bugs.

    I’m "steve_web" in the IE Feedback site, and I have documented many of these bugs in there. (just do a search for "prompt()".

    I am a developer, and I also use the Web Browser, to create web sites, and web based applications.

    This means 2 things.

    1.) When I see, a bug in another piece of software, that can be easily (both time and effort) fixed, I inform the app developer, and if Open Source, offer to add the patch myself.  I would much rather see it get fixed right away, than anoy a single other end-user or developer.

    2.) As a Web Developer, I actually **DEPEND** on the quality of the Web Browser applications, when designing My applications.  It is normally not a problem, because if there is a bug in Opera, Safari, Konqeror, or Mozilla, I can submit the bug… and expect a fix in the short term, or as mentioned above, do the fix myself (e.g. Mozilla)

    – = – = – = – = –

    Now, here’s the problem.  Fixing this dialog, is a 5min coding exercise, but I CANT DO IT, because it is a Closed Source application.  All I can do, is notify the developers (MS), and request that they implement the fix.

    The bugs with this dialog, have been known about for years, and have been in the IE Feedback site, since shortly after its creation, so I what I ask is, where is the fix? Why does it take several months, to apply a 5 minute fix?… better yet, why is it still not fixed, and worse yet, why are the MS developers even thinking of debating this… its a bug, fix it, where is the need for discussion?

    Now, I’m glad you’ve added more details as to why the bar is there, and how it is implemented.  I’m sorry to hear that it is busted, I can’t believe you are sticking with the "is the way we designed it for IE7" line… there was obviously a serious lack of whiteboard sessions on this, if the "designed" method, is to destroy useability, for the sake of a yet undesclosed security reason.

    Speaking of security… other browsers IDENTIFY the source of the dialog, by putting the hostname in the title (see Opera/Firefox). THIS SOLUTION WORKS!

    By telling the user, that a site is going to open a prompt() dialog, that doesn’t indicate where it is from, DOES NOT PROVIDE A SOLUTION to the problem.

    Worse yet, because there are scenarios (think AJAX, onload, onAnyNonUserEvent) where prompt() is called, you’ve effectively destroyed the useability of this method.

    Now, to end my rant, what anoyed me the most about your follow up, was the attempt to shift blame on the proprietay method call issue.

    Web developers have used the prompt() and alert() methods for ages, BECAUSE they were standard!  and NO, MS did not have them first.

    From a JavaScript 1.2 reference on my desk, published by Netscape, in 1997, for Windows, Mac and Unix… it clearly indicates use of the JavaScript functions window.prompt(), window.alert(), window.print(), window.open() etc.

    THEY ARE STANDARD, and are available in EVERY OTHER BROWSER*

    *potentially excluding lite-weights and text-only browsers.

    So to wrap up.  It is a 5 minute fix. If you can’t find a resource at MS, to fix this, how about opening up your development to the massive resources available across the globe.

    If this was opened to the public, we would have a fix checked in for you within 10 minutes.

    Steve

  22. steve_web says:

    Hello fellow IE Blog watchers!

    If you are seriously concerned with the developments of IE7, and want the development team to know which issues are important, please log into the Feedback site, and vote for bugs.

    They say the squeaky wheel gets the grease, so please start squeaking the most needing wheels.

    Regarding my comments above, if you too also feel these bugs need to be fixed ASAP, please vote on the bugs below so that they get the appropriate attention.

    "calls to window.prompt() now show an information bar, requiring user confirmation to display"

    FeedbackID=216713

    "JavaScript window.prompt() dialog display issues (size)" [[Size issue only]]

    FeedbackID=216713

    "JavaScript window.prompt() dialog display issues (size & position)"

    FeedbackID=61398

    Other bugs, reported by other developers/testers/users:

    "Beta 3 – Popup Blocker blocks prompts on trusted sites"

    FeedbackID=152525

    "Problem executing javascript via the context menu."

    FeedbackID=167211

    Thanks

    Steve

  23. @ Travis[MSFT}: ‘Granted, showModalDialog is not a "standard" method, but neither is "prompt", "alert", or "confirm"! It just so happens that those methods were also adopted by other browsers for compatibility with IE.’

    Actually, Brendan Eich introduced those methods when he created the first version of JavaScript, in Netscape Navigator 2 back in 1996. IE adopted them in version 3, for compatibility with Navigator.

    Whie I am grateful for the work the IE Team have done in IE 7 (and told Chris Wilson so at @media in London earlier this year) I have to say that I feel that this kind of "IE led and everybody followed" attitude smacks of the arrogance that has led to so much resentment of Microsoft among the web development community over the years.

    Microsoft didn’t invent the browser, didn’t invent JavaScript, and didn’t invent "DOM Level 0" (as it’s now known). They have a responsibility to maintain compatibility with those methods they have chosen to borrow from other implementations of these technologies.

  24. hAl says:

    Sites that use prompts and alerts generally any me and a lot of other surfers.

    Preferred solution is to remove them altogether from the spec.

  25. Hans Olsson says:

    I just want to say that I agree with hAl – site that use prompts just make me switch to a better site.

  26. Brett Merkey says:

    §

    The JavaScript prompt is an effective way to direct user action in Web applications and sites. In fact, the prompt() behavior is reliably known and is part of the stock of expected behaviors upon which user-centered design is based.

    When XP SP2 was released, I watched a group of experienced users click fruitlessly in a screen — all concluding that the screen was dead. *Not one* person noticed the scrawny little yellow bar at the top of the screen! Even when I pointed it out, there was some confusion concerning the relation between this bar and the application.

    The rationale I am hearing from Microsoft posters is troubling. This type of thinking is very shallow and gives great concern to those of us who create browser-based applications.

    This is another example of how far a team of desktop application makers can go off track when that team has no real experience making Web applications based upon that desktop app.

    Brett Merkey

    §

  27. hAl says:

    > The JavaScript prompt is an effective way to direct

    > user action in Web applications and sites.

    Effective way ten years ago mayby. Only really poor application builders use prompt for user interaction on webapplications. I see it mostly as a depreciated feature.

  28. Steve says:

    I don’t think anyone answered Arnold’s question, when is the browser coming out?

  29. Aedrin says:

    "I watched a group of experienced users click fruitlessly in a screen"

    They must not have been that experienced. I haven’t ever seen anyone have trouble with the concept of the yellow notification bar. (Scrawny, new glasses needed maybe?)

    And I agree with with hAl, the prompt is for the past.

  30. Joseph says:

    MOUSE Mode Select in IE Explorer.

    While you are at it, Add a selection to rotate though mouse (or pointer) selection modes.

    Ctrl + 5 clicks – Change Mode (Cursor) and Beep

    Modes are

    – Smart Select – When selecting Text, automatically select entire word and sections (Table Cells and Divs). (Current Behavior)

    – Precision Select Text Only- When selecting, select character by character within crossing tables and division.

    – Precision Select – When selecting, select characters and images within crossing tables and divisions. (Removes table formatting).

    Put an indicator in the status or change the cursor.

    Optional

    – Add this to the browser options page.

    – User pagemark select mode – Place a temporary find marker at the location and allow precision select until copied or cut. Allow the user to to use the mouse to scroll from for off page scrolling. Useful for long selection of information in tables.

    Anything else obvious?

  31. Greg says:

    @Joseph

    I’m not for all of your options, but I would for sure love an option to **NOT** select the trailing space when selecting words/paragraphs from the screen.

    With a little fiddling scrolling back and forth, you can get IE to not select it, but it is a pain, and should be off by default.

    The number of times I’ve seen users highlight an email address, or url, or name, then copy it into a search field somewhere, then pull their hair out when it doesn’t work is far too many to count.

    Likewise, if I select, from the middle of a word, it is because I wanted to select from the middle of a word.  Stop trying to guess that I want to select everything!

    e.g. try this in IE (then try in other browsers).  In the following line, select "market of intel" only.

    [[[[We went to the supermarket of inteligent design.]]]]

    It is a pain, isn’t it. (except in other browsers)

  32. suggestion to Internet Explorer Devl Team:

    Earlier versions of your xml parser returned row and colums information upon encountering an syntax error. For whatever reason you have dropped that feature with the version delivered with XP SP2.

    PLEASE BRING THAT BACK – or improve how the parser displays the faulty string – I use the xml format for scientific programs and parse input files using the explorer, a task that has become much more difficult lately

    regards

  33. Gilbert says:

    Just an FYI…Flash Player 9 will not work under IE7 RC1. It will under other browsers.

    Comcast.com, youtube.com, and others require it. is this an IE7 bug or do I need to go bug Adobe?

  34. ieblog says:

    @Gilbert

    Can you please send an email providing more details on the issues you are encountering with the sites you listed in your comment so we may further investigate?

  35. Robert says:

    Agree with Gilbert-on Roadrunner’s home page sub-windows do not open when clicked because Flash Player 9 is not functioning.  Website is:

    http://www.rr.com/flash/index.cfm.  Is there a simple fix?

  36. Robert says:

    Dear IE Team-I experimented and download Mozilla Foxfire and am using this as my browser.  The Roadrunner home page loads much more quickly and completely.  The links that would not open using IE7 function normally using Mozilla Foxfire as my browser.  Until IE7 is  fully sorted out I will not be using it.

    Robert  

  37. Jerry Mead says:

    Just checking the IE | Internet Options | Advanced | Software DEP (enable memory protection etc …) as advised by those docs. We’re fine, but I notice that (on Vista 5744) when either Adobe Reader 7.x or Flash 9.x are invoked they cause the browser to shut down immediately when software DEP is running. Both run fine when software DEP is not running.

    Maybe someone needs to mention this to Adobe so that they can get their act together and address this in time for IE7 release.

  38. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Jerry: We’re working with vendors on DEP-compatibility now.  I should clarify that the current recommendation is that developers ensure that their add-ons are DEP-compatible.  To date, I don’t think the IE team has recommended that end-users enable DEP.

    Fortunately, Protected Mode serves as a great defense in depth against the any exploits that would have been blocked by DEP.

  39. TMaster says:

    I think it’s a huge, huge shame that Internet Explorer 7 RC1 doesn’t work with the security measures in Windows XP.

    Try right clicking the IE icon, and running it while having "Protect my computer and data from unauthorized program activity" enabled.

    I know I suffer from Slashdot-like paranoia, but I’m seeing all kinds of Vista-marketing scams here. (Microsoft promoting how much more safe IE7 is on Vista because they broke the security measures embedded in XP.)

    I know I can still run it as a limited user, but still – I like being able to run apps without having any write access. That includes IE.

    N. B.: This is not an attack at any individual programmer. I just hope what I’m seeing isn’t clever marketing.

  40. JW says:

    We are running ASP with VSFlexGrid v7.  After Microsoft settled the ActiveX lawsuit we were forced to change how we were loading our ActiveX controls to this:

    — HTML File in Body Tag

    <script language=javascript src="GridDisplay.js"></script>

    — GridDisplay.JS

    document.write(‘<OBJECT classid="CLSID:D76D712E-4A96-11d3-BD95-D296DC2DD072" id="SrcGrid" width=265 height=625 border=0 VIEWASTEXT codebase="http://www.justmrp.com/Packages/vsflex7.cab"&gt;‘)

    document.write(‘</OBJECT>’)

    The problem I have seen with IE7 RC1 is that it does not always read the src="GridDisplay.js" command correctly… for example, the JS file is called "GridDisplay.js" and it does not read – so I change it to "GridDISPLAY.js" and it reads and displays the ActiveX – or alerts or whatever…

    Has anyone else experienced this problem?  Is there a workaround available?  If not, I hope you are not planning on releasing IE7 any time soon.

  41. Saravanan says:

    Gilbert,

    I had the same problem when installing flash player9. The flash site says "Flash Player successfully installed" but it wasn’t. I have corrected by installing http://www.macromedia.com/go/full_flashplayer_win_ie

  42. RE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/IETechCol/cols/dnexpie/ie7_css_compat.asp

    1.

    * HTML Filter

    This CSS filter is based on a parser bug. It used to show rules exclusive to Internet Explorer. These constructs will now be ignored by Internet Explorer 7 and later.

    2.

    There is a declarative solution using min/max width/height properties that can correct behavior issues introduced by the overflow correction. Consider the following example.

    You can correct this behavior by using the new min-height property for all modern browsers like IE7. To ensure that your behavior does not change for older versions of IE, we recommend the use of conditional comments.

    Latest RC1 release of IE7 as tested on 3 seperate machines does not follow either of the above rules. Please see screenshots for the same site viewed in <a href="http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/IE6.jpg">ie6</a&gt;, <a href="http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/IE7.jpg">ie7</a&gt; and <a href="http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/Firefox.jpg">firefox</a&gt;.

    This site can be viewed live at http://www.quads4kids.co.uk. It uses the * html hack to allow ie6 to render correctly as shown by the screen shot above. IE7, which should ignore the * html rule DOESN’T ignore it hence forcing the site to display incorrectly.

    Please explain.

  43. RE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/IETechCol/cols/dnexpie/ie7_css_compat.asp

    1.

    * HTML Filter

    This CSS filter is based on a parser bug. It used to show rules exclusive to Internet Explorer. These constructs will now be ignored by Internet Explorer 7 and later.

    2.

    There is a declarative solution using min/max width/height properties that can correct behavior issues introduced by the overflow correction. Consider the following example.

    You can correct this behavior by using the new min-height property for all modern browsers like IE7. To ensure that your behavior does not change for older versions of IE, we recommend the use of conditional comments.

    Latest RC1 release of IE7 as tested on 3 seperate machines does not follow either of the above rules. Please see screenshots for the same site viewed in http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/IE6.jpg, http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/IE7.jpg,  http://www.virtualwebmaster.co.uk/images/Firefox.jpg.

    This site can be viewed live at http://www.quads4kids.co.uk. It uses the * html hack to allow ie6 to render correctly as shown by the screen shot above. IE7, which should ignore the * html rule DOESN’T ignore it hence forcing the site to display incorrectly.

    Please explain.

  44. Mike Wintersgill says:

    Re: Above 2 posts

    For anyone familiar with Faulty Towers,

    "I’m sorry, my wife made a mistake!"

    Doh! Different problem all together.

  45. Steven Burda, MBA says:

    Thanks for the Updates!

    – Steven Burda, MBA

    http://www.linkedin.com/in/burda

    e-mail: steven.burda.mba @gmail.com

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