Revised IE7 Naming in Windows Vista


Windows Internet Explorer 7

I had mentioned a while back that we planned to call the version of IE7 in Windows Vista “Internet Explorer 7+”. Well, the feedback we got on the blog was overwhelming – many of you didn’t like it. So, as we’ve said on our website, we heard you. I’m pleased to announce that we’re switching the name back to “Internet Explorer 7”. No plus. No dot x. Just “Internet Explorer 7”.

Specifically, here are the official full names:

  • For Windows XP: “Windows Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP”
  • For Windows Vista: “Windows Internet Explorer 7 in Windows Vista”

Those can be a bit of a mouthful, so you’ll see us using the shorter “Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP” and “Internet Explorer 7 in Windows Vista” when we need to refer a platform-specific feature (like Protected Mode in Windows Vista). We’ll use “Internet Explorer 7” to talk about IE in general and features that are consistent across all platforms (like the Phishing Filter).

We’re glad we checked with you all before we shipped so we didn’t go out with an unpopular name. Thanks for all your feedback – keep it up!

Tony Chor
Group Program Manager

Comments (185)

  1. Yep, IE Group Program Manager Tony Chor just announced that the masses have spoken, and the version of…

  2. lynn says:

    Hey, you can use the following free of charge if you like:

    IE 7 XP

    IE 7 Vista

  3. TheViewMaster says:

    Again…

    OT: Internet Options —> Advanced —>

    [] Open New Windows Full Screen.

    Mahalo!

    😉

  4. Great! Now we only need to convince the .NET team to rebrand .NET Framework 3.0 to .NET Framework 2.5

  5. game kid says:

    For some reason I didn’t expect the change.

    (and I wanted it)

  6. Noah says:

    Awesome. You listened. I was shocked to see it. Honestly, I didn’t know the IE team knew how to do that.

    Now, how about listening to our other thousands of suggestions?

  7. Bogota says:

    When will IE7 Final be released? Any hints or ideas?

  8. greg says:

    So if you know the full name is a mouthfull, why tack on the "Windows" at the front?  Oh yes, I remember.  It’s because of the "it’s not an applications, it’s an integrated part of Windows" defense in the DOJ trial.

    Anyway, this is an improvement.

  9. Apparently a high number of users complained about the different naming for the Internet Explorer 7 browser

  10. Mark says:

    Oh my god! You actually listen! In that case: please please please redo the in-webpage search, it’s the only feature that I can’t trump when my friends and I argue about which browser is better.

  11. ??? says:

    Well the names are too long…….

    internet explorer 7 & 7+ Sounded better

  12. Bogota: We plan to ship IE7 in Q4 of this year.

    Mark: We desperately want to fix in-webpage search too, but it’ll have to wait for a future version. We’re locking down now and focusing on getting the quality right.

    Noah: Hopefully you’ve seen from the blog and the product, we have been listening. We know there are tons of other things the community wants to see in IE; we’ll get to do more of them in future releases.

    Gabriel: Sorry, we don’t get a vote on the .NET naming.

  13. MusicRobRob says:

    Hugely impressed – thanks for listening to us. :)  Posted about it on Neowin for yous.

  14. amrta says:

    myIE7.com,For Sale!!!

  15. amrta says:

    You’ve opened a new tab  

       

       

    With tabs you can:

    Use one Internet Explorer window to view all your webpages.  

    Open links in a background tab while viewing the page you’re on.  

    Save and open multiple webpages at once by using favorites and home page tabs.  

    To get started:

    Press the CTRL key while clicking links (or use the middle mouse button).  

    Click any tab with the middle mouse button to close it.  

    Press ALT+ENTER from the address bar or search box to open the result in a new tab.  

     

        Learn more about tabs  

     

        Hide tab shortcuts  

    Keyboard shortcuts Open links in a new tab in the background  CTRL+click  

    Open links in a new tab in the foreground  CTRL+SHIFT+click  

    Open a new tab in the foreground  CTRL+T  

    Open a new tab from the address bar  ALT+ENTER  

    Open a new tab from the Toolbar Search Box  ALT+ENTER  

    Open Quick Tabs (thumbnail view)  CTRL+Q  

    Switch between tabs  CTRL+TAB/CTRL+SHIFT+TAB  

    Switch to a specific tab number  CTRL+n (n can be 1-8)  

    Switch to the last tab  CTRL+9  

    Close current tab  CTRL+W  

    Close all tabs  ALT+F4  

    Close other tabs  CTRL+Alt+F4  

    Mouse shortcuts Open a link in a background tab  Middle mouse button on a link  

    Open a new tab  Double click on empty tab row space  

    Close a tab  Middle mouse button on the tab  

     

       

       Don’t show this page again  Close

  16. Allain says:

    Great job guys…for short I offer the obvious IE7 XP and IE7 V…now if you guys could only find a way to make them about:blank proof lol

  17. Last one in says:

    Call it anything you want, just get it to quit crashing

  18. Cam says:

    Good work on the name change, and I’ll put in another vote for IE7 xp and IE7 Vista.

  19. Tyler Cranston says:

    Great job!! Best decision!!!

  20. For a while I was puzzled by why there’re so many products using codename before they are officially released, like Chicago (Windows 95), Tiger (for both J2SE 5.0 and Mac OS X v10.4), Avalon (Windows Presentation Foundation) and so on. Until I’ve came

  21. BB says:

    General feedback.  Unrelated matter.

    With the Find on this Page… feature in the search box, how about just having the search from the first field?  The modal window for the page find seems so clunky, but I understand if you have to keep it to support legacy applications.

  22. war59312 says:

    Thank God! Great call! :)

  23. McoreD says:

    I am sad to say, there is no consistancy in the naming.

    * For Windows XP: “Windows Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP”

    * For Windows Vista: “Windows Internet Explorer 7 in Windows Vista”

    It must be "Windows Internet Explorer 7 for Windows Vista", in my opinion, for consistancy and sound better. :)

  24. I think I shall just call it ‘IE7’, perhaps ‘IE7 for XP’ or ‘IE7 for Vista’ if I really need to differentiate. Life’s too short to keep using those mouthfuls that you’ve decided on.

  25. The IE team have changed their mind about the name for Internet Explorer 7, in Windows Vista.  They’re…

  26. hongquan says:

    在五月底的时候,微软的IE开发小组曾说过要将Windows Vista中的IE命名为“Ineternet Explorer 7 ”。但现在他们又改变了注意,放弃了“ ”的称谓,没有后缀,没有.x,就只是“Internet Explorer 7”。

  27. AJ says:

    Well if you had shipped with your original name, you would have created a great deal of confusion amongst users who dont know any better, IE7 im pleased to say was dragged together because of Firefox gaining a lot of momentum i hope that firefox gets more market share, because then it will ultimately keep MS on their toes and the IE team developing and innovating, in an area where creativity is never lost.

    One request for the interface of IE7 is that it seems the buttons are slightly too close together there should be a bit more space between them i think, it just looks cramped up there on the UI.

    AJ

  28. Jim says:

    What was the thinking behind for the different "for" and "in" naming?

    Seems a bit odd to me. Surely both are "for" the OS, and neither is really "in" it?

    Eitherway, everyone will end up saying "for" for both – normal people don’t care enough that your marketing guys think being "in" Vista is cool or whatever.

  29. Zyaq says:

    Will the IE7 XP and IE7 Vista have the same version-number, or will you be able to tell which OS the customer is using from the version number og IE7?

    With IE5 IE had different version numbers depending on OS, but in IE6 the same version number was used both on Win98 and WinXP.

    Users are often not aware of the version of Windows they run, so it would be nice to be able to distinguish IE7 for XP and IE7 for Vista on the version number.

  30. So what’s the new name? Microsoft’s Tony Chor explains at the IEBlog:

  31. cooperpx says:

    Wow. Thank you x 2 Guys! You’re actually listening. :)

    Since you’re listening: IE7 looks great. It’s a huge improvement, and I look forward to getting in and depending on it being there. Just please don’t drop back to maintenance mode after release!

  32. Dave says:

    Thanks for changing the name. It just goes to prove that "preaching to the Chor" can work sometimes. (Ba dum pum, thank you very much, I’ll be here all week.)

  33. Luca says:

    I preferred IE7+ ;-(

  34. Wouter says:

    I’m a bit curious as to the thoughts behind using the word "for" in the Windows XP version and the word "in" in the Vista version. I mean, there must be some important reason for it, because it doesn’t seem obvious to do it that way.

  35. Jordan says:

    The difference between ‘for’ and ‘in’ is quite obvious. IE7 will be available ‘for’ download for users of Windows XP, whereas Vista will be shipped with IE7 already ‘in’ it.

    I hope that explains.

  36. CX says:

    I am assuming it is because one isn’t required to upgrade to IE7 when using XP, meanwhile Vista ships with IE7 so it is "in" the Vista installation image.

    Of course, I don’t remember reading about it, but is Microsoft going to include IE7 "in" SP3 for XP?  If so, that would mean they would have to change the name for those installing from XPSP3 installation media to "IE7 in XP"… 😉

  37. BenN says:

    So the offical name contains the word Windows twice? What’s that about?

    Seriously guys, please be the first team to show some common sense and fight the marketing guys when they say it’s Windows <insert product name here>. Pretty soon we’re probably going to get something like Windows Windows Live Windows Internet Windows Explorer Live for Windows Live Windows XP Windows. And someone somewhere will think that’s a good name…

  38. Good Choice says:

    Great decision!

    I’m glad, thank you very much.

    That’s the way to go.

  39. daza says:

    I am so impressed to see that the name has been changed. Great work!

    I do have somewhat of a suggestion though; is it possible to have tabs close on a double-click? Even if it’s not a default option, but someting you can change in advanced settings? It makes life so much easier, would love to hear why it can’t be implemented though.

    Regads.

  40. Jug says:

    "internet explorer 7 & 7+ Sounded better"

    The problem is just the conflict in the de facto standard of "version X+" to tell "version X or higher", which was the major problem with the former branding.

    Sounds like a good decision to me!

    As someone said, .NET Framework 3.0 should now just be 2.5 and I’m quite happy. The problem with "3.0" is that the actual core framework is still 2.0 without any special changes, and they bundle more API’s with it. 3.0 also conflicts with the C# 3.0 that won’t be included. 2.5 would tell the users that it’s 2.0 "with more stuff".

  41. Not to ignore the hard work I’m sure you folks put in to IE7 but will users be able to actually uninstall it (in the actually definition of uninstall) should it become a huge source of problems 3-4 years in to Vista’s live life-span or will it simply be a remove shortcuts deal we have in XP?

    Also will we see an update option like with Firefox to streamline patches? For example browsers really need to be ready for CSS3 and I for one am tired of seeing table layouts that could be replaced by multiple background support via CSS3 on pages lacking tabular data. It’s 2006 and I assume Vista will come out mid-2007 and CSS3 before, we die if we’re lucky. I would also assume this might be an IE8 feature unless for some reason Windows Update could simply patch the MSHTML.DLL file unless it is not that easy?

    With IE7 there are only so much left that can be complained about until the focus is lifted from you folks to the W3C. How long have they been working on CSS3? Any word on if they will ever get it finished?

    http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/current-work

  42. Dave: "Preaching to the Chor"? Really? [Groan]. Actually, I think "chor" in German means "choir", so maybe it works.

    Steven: Yes, the difficulties naming stuff is exactly why we use codenames upfront. Besides, if we hadn’t used "Chicago" as the codename for Windows 95, we would have been calling it "Windows 93" for a long time…

    Jim: As CX pointed out correctly, the "in" vs. "for" thing is conscious. IE7 is *in* Windows Vista because it’s the version of IE that ships with Vista. IE7 is *for* XP because it’s available as an update to the version of IE that shipped with the OS (IE6).

    Zyaq: Both versions will have the same version number. The naming for IE5/5.01 caused a lot of confusion, so we’re trying to avoid that situation again.

    CX: We haven’t closed on our XP SP3 plans yet, but we have not historically updated the version of IE in Windows service packs.

  43. Graham says:

    Cool. Good to see progress like this.

  44. Tom says:

    I think the name should stay the same in any new windows that comes up, like when you guys get to IE8 don’t change it keep it the way it is so there’s not alot of confusion in future new windows.

  45. IE7 – Windows Vista に含まれる IE7 の名前の変更

  46. Omry Yadan says:

    What about Windows 2000?

  47. codemastr says:

    Really glad you guys listened to the criticism. But a minor comment/question. What’s the point of "for Windows XP" and "in Windows Vista"? It might just be semantics, but it seems weird to me to not use the same phrases for both.

  48. Kevin Burton says:

    Its awesome that you guys are opening up this process… prevents you from ending up with a stupid name like "MacBook Pro" :-)

    (sorry about the previous post… hit submit by mistake)

  49. Starwood Previews New Hotel Brand in Second Life – I have blogged before about Starwood’s well-named new offering Aloft and now Micropersuasion gives us a heads up on the new brand strategy for the same product name: they are going to preview the hotels

  50. Keith Cash says:

    IE 7 works well Good product.

    Any difference between the XP and Vista IE7?

  51. Revised IE7 Naming – Microsoft has decided to drop the &quot;Internet Explorer 7+&quot; name it was going to use for the version of its browser that would run on the upcoming Vista operating system. Users had complained that it left too much room for

  52. Ellis says:

    This IE7 sound good I guess it is time for me to down load it.

  53. Hector B says:

    This looks good. Keep the names to go with the operating system.

    Cuts down on confusion

  54. Andy C says:

    A wise decision I think. Good to see you guys listening to the feedback you get again.

  55. Gary Turner says:

    John A. Bilicki III said "With IE7 there are only so much left that can be complained about until the focus is lifted from you folks to the W3C. How long have they been working on CSS3? Any word on if they will ever get it finished?"

    How is CSS3 an issue when IE7 will still have only a bare modicum of support for CSS2, and no support for xhtml?  Moz/Gecko, Opera and Safari all have high degrees of CSS2 support and are testing CSS3 properties that have reached Release Candidate status.  IE has zip.  The issue is not W3C, it is IE that is holding the technology back.  We can’t use what we have because a majority browser doesn’t support it.  We have some wonderful thoroughbreds in Firefox, Safari and Opera, but we must move at the pace of a broken down nag pulling the ice wagon.  That nag isn’t slow because the track isn’t good enough.  It’s slow because it’s old and it’s broken, and a few bug fixes and cosmetic changes won’t help that.

    cheers,

    gary

  56. Xepol says:

    Thank you.  This provides greater clarity for those of us who have to support the masses.

    Now they can say they are running IE7 and specify the OS, instead of hunting for obscure, meaningless suffixes.

    After all, it’s hard enough just to get them to know they are using IE or firefox most of the time, let alone the version.  Obscure sub version settings are right out the question.

    Again, thank you for making our lives a little easier.

  57. Sequoia030 says:

    Youhou, great idea. Happy to hear that you are at least reading our reviews!

  58. Jon says:

    Jug said:

    >>The problem is just the conflict in the de facto standard of "version X+" to tell "version X or higher", which was the major problem with the former branding.<<

    Thanks, Jug. Your post was the only one in the hundreds here that explained just what the problem with "7+" was. I couldn’t understand the big deal of the new name until your post. Now, it makes perfect sense.

    Tony said:

    >>CX: We haven’t closed on our XP SP3 plans yet, but we have not historically updated the version of IE in Windows service packs.<<

    What about XP SP2? Didn’t that come with the new build of IE6 that included pop-blocking support? I think that that was the precendent that people are going off of when thinking that future IE releases will be included in service packs.

    Personally, I think that IE7 is such a major improvement that it *should* be included in SP3. There will still be millions of XP installations even years after Vista. Giving IE7 to users who don’t know enough to get it, themselves, would be doing them a favor, in my opinion.

  59. Jacob says:

    C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S ! ! ! !

    Best Post on this Blog so far!

    MS admits they made a mistake, and fixes it before the final release!

    Welcome to the "listening to your customers era"!

  60. Steve says:

    You can say "in" or "for" all you want.

    As far as your use base is concerned, it will always be:

    Internet Explorer 7, or IE7… they will not care which OS it is _FOR_.

    Using "in" sounds very, very much like a… "hmmm, what would sound the best in future DOJ cases?"… "in" sounds like it is "part" of the OS, so lets go there…

    By the simple fact, that IE7 is downloadable, indicates it is not a required component of the OS.  and when IE8 comes out, and users can download it for Vista, it too, will not be "in" Vista.

    That said, cudos on correcting the name to remove the plus… now, lets get back to fixing all those bugs, so that IE7 can catch up to all the other browsers!

  61. great site with very good look and perfect information…i like it

  62. Reg says:

    There’s only one problem with the new name.

    Most casual users don’t understand the difference between "windows explorer" versus "internet explorer".  Calling it "windows internet explorer … " will put the final nail in the coffin.  These people don’t have a chance on learning the correct program names if you start combining the confusing terminology.

  63. reg says:

    There’s only one problem with the new name.

    Most casual users don’t understand the difference between "windows explorer" versus "internet explorer".  Calling it "windows internet explorer … " will put the final nail in the coffin.  These people don’t have a chance on learning the correct program names if you start combining the confusing terminology.

  64. John says:

    Just call it IE7 XP or IE7 Vista, now move on to fixing the Favicons for God sake !

  65. Bruno says:

    We need tabs =)

  66. Gg says:

    You know that "Microsoft designs the iPod packaging" parody video?  Where they just cram countless amounts of crap onto the box?  You’re doing that again with your product names.

    Why is it *Windows* Internet Explorer?  I can understand some VP liking it because it ties them together and reinforces the brand and blah blah blah, but it’s terrible.  It’s terrible just like "Microsoft Office Outlook 2003".  Apple doesn’t do "Apple Mac OS X iLife 2006."  Stop cramming product names together.  Instead of synergizing the brands or whatever you’re trying to do, you dilute the product name into an unintelligible mess and neither have an impact.

    I’m in IT, and this bugs me so much that when I make images I actually go and rename the icons to "Microsoft Word" and "Microsoft Outlook" before completing it.  I shouldn’t have to clean up your usability mess.

  67. TechBlog says:

    You know you’re in Houston when the forecast calls for a high of 89 and you’re grateful that the temps will at least be under 90. Yes, it’s true. Eighty-nine degrees in early August is actually kinda remarkable around here….

  68. CX says:

    Tony said:

    >>CX: We haven’t closed on our XP SP3 plans yet, but we have not historically updated the version of IE in Windows service packs.<<

    Thanks Jon, while I didn’t expect IE7 to be in SP3, I did write that last part of my post knowing that SP2’s changes to IE6 did open the door at least slightly for Microsoft to choose to go that way if they decided  to.

    I agree that I would prefer a current, patched IE7 to be part of SP3, instead of IE6, for all the clean XP installs IT pros will still be doing in 2007, especially before Vista’s first service pack comes out.

    Which leads to another question, how long will IE6 be updated for security flaws, after IE7 and Vista ship?

    If IE6 security is going to get pushed into background, early on, then it really does make sense to include IE7 in XP’s SP3. Of course, this really only matters to IT pros and so I really doubt saving us time is of any concern.

    Also, I keep reading there are no "finalized plans" for SP3, so maybe they are just going to do a "rollup" like they did for 2000 (instead of SP5)?

  69. Thank goodness Microsoft saw sense.

    I can’t imagine how many people would have asked me &quot;where do I…

  70. John says:

    FAVICONS !  FAVICONS !  FAVICONS !  FAVICONS !

    Please Fix Them Microsoft

  71. Abhijit Akhawe says:

    Hi,

    I have been using IE7 since quite long and would like one feature to be implemented that would help many people a lot.

    What I have in mind is better access to the history through the address bar by supporting wild cards. Thus if I type *.msdn – the drop down should show all the urls browsed by me like blogs.msdn.com/.. OR developer.msdn.com etc..

    Thanks,

    Abhijit.

  72. dgarbis says:

    As`regards comment (Saturday, August 05, 2006 11:56 AM by daza) "…is it possible to have tabs close on a double-click? Even if it’s not a default option, but someting you can change in advanced settings? It makes life so much easier, would love to hear why it can’t be implemented though." What’s so difficult about closing tab by clicking "x" on RH of tab? Why complicate things with redundant commands?

  73. Mrs Miss says:

    Why not just call it "Internet Explorer 7"?  It’s a stand-alone-and-not-tied-to-the-OS browser now, isn’t it?

    Also, I get the idea that the difference is made to allow for different web applications for different OSes, for example Windows Update.  But this is a mistake, Windows Update should be a separate application, and the browser should be left to browsing.

    For any web application that requires you to be using a certain OS with a certain browser, you should simply just create a client for that specific function instead.  Having it all run from a browser just complicates the browser more, and it certainly won’t help in preventing security issues.

    If using Internet Explorer for a client-side application makes sense, it might be because of the reduction in coding overhead because the browser can be used to render the interface, etc.  The trade-off just isn’t worth it with security issues;  Instead a "rich client application" framework should be provided to help developers create their client while minimizing security issues.

    Just please keep the browser separate from other applications!

    If, on the other hand, the OS version needs to be identified in order to render the web page properly, then you should just consider the page broken in the first place.  Nobody should code a web page for a specific browser in a specific OS.  Any properly written web site can be rendered in any recent web browser version and still be as flashy as you want, and degrade nicely for simpler browsers (sans javascript, flash, etc).

  74. h says:

    you know we’re all just going to call it IE7/XP and IE7/Vista and IE7/2k…no wait… ;P

    at least someone at microsoft is willing to go against the flow of "moronic naming decisions". well done, people! :)

  75. Fiery Kitsune says:

    Did IE7 ever have a codename? Or was IE7 just the next logical name in the IE evolution.

  76. PatriotB says:

    "Personally, I think that IE7 is such a major improvement that it *should* be included in SP3."

    From some perspectives it should be (e.g., WMP9 was included in XPSP2), but from others it shouldn’t.  Service packs are meant to be a rollup of fixes that have minimal impact on your computers (remember, XPSP2 was the exception to the service pack rule).  Including IE7 in XPSP3 would be a huge hindrance to corporate adoption of SP3.  And for those organizations that have standardized on IE6, they simply will not apply XPSP3 at all.  Which is not a good thing.

    "Giving IE7 to users who don’t know enough to get it, themselves, would be doing them a favor, in my opinion."

    That’s why IE7 will be offered as a high-priority update on Windows Update.

    "Which leads to another question, how long will IE6 be updated for security flaws, after IE7 and Vista ship?"

    From what I understand, Windows XP will be in mainstream support for two additional years once Vista ships, and then five years of extended support after that.  So, if Vista ships on January 1, 2007, that puts XP’s end of support at January 1, 2014.  And from what I understand, Microsoft will support IE6 on XP for that entire duration, since IE6 was the version that shipped with XP (the same reason that they still support IE 5.01 on Windows 2000).

    "Why not just call it "Internet Explorer 7"?  It’s a stand-alone-and-not-tied-to-the-OS browser now, isn’t it?"

    It’s not tied to the Windows Explorer shell anymore–that’s all.  It’s still a part of the OS.  Personally I’m kind of neutral about the naming–it brings it in line with programs like Windows Media Player.  But on the other hand, where do you draw the line?  Windows Paint?  Windows Character Map?  Plus the issue that was brought up about the name being confused with Windows Explorer.

    Lastly — thanks, IE team, for listening to us regarding the plus!

  77. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @daza: Middle-click works to close tabs.

    @Zyaq: Both versions will have the same version number, but you can sniff the OS platform from the tokens.  See http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/author/dhtml/overview/aboutuseragent.asp

  78. graham says:

    Should have called it Internet Exterminator

    Will MS finally make IE stop crashing when you have 5 windows open, all of them important?

    and get rid of that annoying send/don’t send option. if it didn’t crash we wouldn’t need it

  79. &amp;nbsp; That’s it the Internet Explorer team listened to the feedback they got from you. They changed…

  80. Gareth says:

    How about Microsoft Firefox Emulator?

  81. Lordmike says:

    I want Internet Explorer 7 to be released when it actually works, no known bugs, tested more then ever before so that IT professionals actually wish to install it on company computers without risk of loosing thousand of work hours etc etc.

    Same with Vista. Release it when it works, not sooner (I know that’s not your table on the IE team about Vista, but still).

  82. John says:

    Fix the FAVICONS !!!!!!!!

  83. Sergey says:

    What a great news! Who cares about naming if it works slow or have bugs? Focus on quality, solve naming problems later.

  84. Fred Smith says:

    Who cares what it’s called?  It’ll still be the usual POS that we’ve come to know and love.  Oh wait… I just completed the Windows Eradication Project… my entire network is now Linux, thank you, including desktops

  85. Brad! says:

    WHen I first saw the ‘for’ versus ‘in’, my thoughts were that it was created -for- XP, but it was stuck -in’ Vista (Not really for vista, but in Vista….)

    hmmmm…..

  86. Good news.  The for/in thing is weird, and the multiple "Windows" are repetitive, but as long as it doesn’t confuse people about what "7+" is you can call it whatever you like.  Personally, I would have gone with:

    Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP

    Internet Explorer 7 for Windows Vista

    Clear, concise, no explanation needed.

  87. PatriotB says:

    @Lordmike — If any software product waits to release until there are "no known bugs", then it will never be released.

  88. MSFT says:

    How about:

    Microsoft Windows Firefox Emulator 7 in Microsoft Windows Vista for Microsoft Windows Vista?

  89. Some Random Tester says:

    Hooray!

  90. AC says:

    Seriously, what is with the in/for confusion with people on here?

    It was already explained early on, and yet still the comments.

    You won’t see:

    "Internet Explorer 6 for/in Vista" as nothing less than IE7 will be available.

    You will see:

    "Internet Explorer 7 for XP", just as you had seen "Internet Explorer 6 in XP" or "Internet Explorer 6 for Windows 2000".

    Is this really that troublesome to people?

  91. Fiery Kitsune says:

    Why don’t you guys just call both versions IE7 Rincon?

  92. Brian Sexton says:

    "We’re glad we checked with you all before we shipped so we didn’t go out with an unpopular name."

    Then now that you have updated everyone, you might want to keep your eyes and ears open for more feedback and keep your mind open to revise the name again because mentioning Windows twice in the same name seems like a bafflingly silly decision, even by Internet Explorer standards.  Then again, shipping with a silly name just might distract people from Internet Explorer’s still-poor CSS support (as of the beta/preview releases I have tried under both Windows XP and Windows Vista).

  93. Fireballs says:

    Great so now we can get confused about which verson you are talking about.

  94. DR-Drew says:

    I don’t know if it’s just me, but my biggest complaint about IE7 is that when I double click in on my desktop or try to open it, it takes a very long time to load and open my homepage (yahoo.com).

    Really, that’s about it. But I would like a quicker initial response and be able to use the browser as fast as I can use IE6 or firefox.

  95. Over on the&amp;nbsp;Internet Explorer blog Tony Chor informs the community that Internet Explorer for Windows…

  96. Volatire says:

    Will IE7 save us all? Hope springs eternal but alas I fret. In fact, I pine for the days of Active Desktop when everything was to be a web page.

    Is there any way, $MSFT can revive this?

  97. David Wrixon says:

    Yes, never mind the semantics and never mind all the publicity that Bill likes to get being a friend of the Third World. It is high time that he got and delivered, what due to his virtual monopoly of the OS and Browser markets, he is uniquely in a position to deliver and has persistently refused to deliver over the last five years or so. That is multilingual support to enable the non-English speaking world to have fair access to the intent. Come on, cut the crap and give us an IDN enabled browser ASAP. Only when he has done a home run on this moral obligation will I ever begin to take the rest of it seriously.

  98. Al says:

    maybe 7# or 7.Net would have sold better

  99. This is a very good blog which gives a lot of information.

  100. Lordmike says:

    @PatriotB

    If they know about a bug which can compromise the system, they should be blamed for all data loss. The company which released the product should pay a fee if they knew about the bug and didn’t do anything about it. Some bugs are apparent when a program is released and yet it hasn’t been fixed. This is what I don’t like at all.

    Or am I wrong to want a bug free product (unknown bugs are impossible to remove because they are unknown)?

    In nuclear power plants like the ones the company I work for own, the system isn’t even allowed to have unknown bugs and yet they manage.. wow. Must be good programmers, because it’s failsafe in 99.9% of the time.

  101. Mike says:

    @LordMike: If your nuke reactor is only 99.9% safe, then you should be shutdown immediately, since it would fail every few days.

    Any engineer who knows anything about defects knows that "Bugfree" software isn’t practical, or even desirable.  No one could afford it.

    @David: They’ve been blogging about IDN support in IE for months.  Lose the conspiracy theories and read up on it.

    @John: FavIcons seem to work for everyone else.  Rather than posting worthless rants, why not describe the bug you see?

  102. David Wrixon says:

    @ Mike

    It is not conspiracy theory. Microsoft’s failure to timely deliver an IDN enabled browser has almost certainly done more damage to Third World economies than any of Bill’s Philanthropy will ever be able to put right.

    Because of it near monopoly in the Developing World Browser market, Microsoft has borne moral responsibilities that it has wantonly neglected. Everyday, it it costing those countries Millions, if not Billions of dollars. That lost development is also costing lives. Microsoft have a responsiblity to get this thing out there as soon as possible. Stopping fannying around. Get this thing sorted and get on with distributing it.

  103. Lordmike says:

    @Mike

    What I want is not a bug free system, as that is impossible to achieve. But a system with no known bugs, that is possible because the engineers here at work manage it on nuclear reactor systems.

    It’s all about testing, testing and some more testing. If the bug is known, remove it. If another bugg is found, remove it etc.

    Lets say Microsoft release Windows Vista with a known bug which they can remove, but wont because this will delay Vista 7 months… They will release it and work on fixing it. What I want is the release to be after those 7 months. Am I more clear now or shall I continue?

  104. moimoi says:

    hola

    hay alguien que sepa hablar español

    moimoi_juana@hotmail.com

  105. moimoi says:

    hola

    hay alguien que sepa hablar español

    moimoi_juana@hotmail.com

  106. Fini Alring says:

    but but but… IE7+ sounds so cool!! I don’t believe how you could ever question this name!! It’s like IE7 only better!

  107. Oneda says:

    H&#225; algum tempo atr&#225;s, comentei sobre o IE 7+, que seria a vers&#227;o do Internet Explorer para o Windows…

  108. Nikita says:

    Gabriel Lozano-Morán : "Great! Now we only need to convince the .NET team to rebrand .NET Framework 3.0 to .NET Framework 2.5 "

  109. tyrc says:

    It doesnt matter what you call it, its still a carbon copy, rebadged version of Mozilla Firefox. Its pointless having 2 ‘mozillas’ so I am sticking with the original and best.

  110. Aedrin says:

    "It doesnt matter what you call it, its still a carbon copy, rebadged version of Mozilla Firefox. Its pointless having 2 ‘mozillas’ so I am sticking with the original and best."

    So which are you sticking with? Internet Explorer has features that Firefox has, okay. But Firefox has features that Internet Explorer has had way before. And imagine this, Firefox and Internet Explorer also have features that other browsers might’ve had.

    Welcome to the world of technology where features are added because they work good, not because someone else hasn’t had it.

    I fail to see how Mozilla Firefox is "the original". Being based on an existing browser, introducing features several years old as though they are new…

  111. cj says:

    i’ll agree with several other people here and say that your naming convention is horrible.  who in their right might is going to spit all that out every time they need to say that IE is broken again, or that another bug has been found, or that the standards aren’t supported for such-and-such feature?

    i applaud taking out the "+", but if instead we have to put up with humongous and repeating word names, i don’t know that we’ve gained anything.

    Internet Explorer 7 for XP

    Internet Explorer 7 for Vista

    KISS – Keep it simple, stupid.

  112. I must say, that I find that the introduction of conditional comments with IE5 has been quite life-saving.

    Yet on the other hand conditional comments also add bloat to each page and this bloat would tend to increase as more and more internet explorer versions become available and have therefore to be treated separately.

    So – why are there no conditional comments in CSS? The syntax could be something like this:

    /*[IF IE 7]/

     .conditional-css-code-here{}

    */

    The selector logic could and should be the same as with the existing html-based conditional comments.

    This would be a huge help for creating layouts that work cross-browser.

    Otherwise with every version of IE the header bloat for each page increases. In this way however it would only be the bloat inside of a small amount of cacheable CSS-files.

    Please consider this.

  113. stageon says:

    Good on ya!

  114. CJ says:

    How about calling it simply "PatchMe+" — because we’ll spend the next four years patching the holes that will inevidably be found in IE7? Besides IE is along the same lines of web browsing tech as Windows Me. Unless something changes IN A BIG WAY, we have little to look forward to in IE7. Well, other than old Firefox features and Swiss cheese overflows… say it with me class, "allowing the execution of arbitrary code". 😉

    Microsoft, I’m ready and willing to be dead wrong — and apologize.

  115. John says:

    I’m probably missing the point here (new to this blog/feed for starters..) but I can’t help but wonder what is wrong with just plain old "IE7" (and, in a similar manner "IE7 for Windows Vista" (etc.etc.))

    Short, recognisable and to the point, surely?!

    Ok, so it’s just me… or is it?

  116. Will says:

    <<Am I more clear now or shall I continue? >>

    If there’s a piece of software with no known flaws, either 1> it’s not been tested, 2> it doesn’t perform any useful function, or 3> its marketshare is dramatically eclipsed by "buggy" competitors that have more features that satisfy more user needs.

  117. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @David Wrixon–

    Let’s be clear here:

    Microsoft had an internationally-enabled browser long before any other significant developer– IE5 supported UTF-8 for navigation.  There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with UTF-8, but standards bodies over the next 5 years decided to invent and adopt Punycode instead of adopting the existing standard.  Hence, IE7 is now supporting Punycode.

    Plugins which offer Punycode support for IE have been available for many years.  Much of the "delay" in supporting IDN on Microsoft’s part was related to ensuring that users are kept safe from phishing scams that plagued early implementers, who didn’t consider the security risks inherent in IDN support (e.g. Schmoo group’s IDN spoof).

    Asserting that third world economies were "impaired" by the unavailability of IDN browsers requires a serious stretch of both logic and the definition of a "third world economy".

    Nevertheless, I share your excitement about the forthcoming release of IE7 and the rise of International Domain names.

  118. I’ve said it here before, and I’m sure you’ve read it elsewhere, but it needs to be said again: Microsoft…

  119. PatriotB says:

    Lordmike…..

    "If they know about a bug which can compromise the system"

    Now you’re talking specifically about known security bugs.  Those are different.  I would hope that Microsoft would continue to fix any security issues that are discovered all the way up until RTM.  (But I wouldn’t expect them to call up their CD manufacturers and halt CD burning if a new bug is found–just release the patch for download once the product is in consumers’ hands.)

    "In nuclear power plants like the ones the company I work for own, the system isn’t even allowed to have unknown bugs and yet they manage.."

    Are you asserting that your company believes it has no unknown bugs?  It is highly, highly unlikely that your system has zero unknown bugs.

    "If the bug is known, remove it. If another bugg is found, remove it etc.

    Lets say Microsoft release Windows Vista with a known bug which they can remove, but wont because this will delay Vista 7 months… They will release it and work on fixing it. What I want is the release to be after those 7 months."

    And what about the additional bugs found during those 7 months–both in the original code and bugs in your fixes?  It’s a never ending cycle, you will be finding bugs forever and thus you would never ship.

    Think it’s wise to wait until there are truly zero known bugs?  I’ll type an excerpt from from "Writing Secure Code" 2nd Edition by Michael Howard and David LeBlanc (page 42):

    "This may seem like blasphemy to some of you, but you have to be realistic: you can never ship flawless software, unless you want to charge millions of dollars for your product.  Moreover, if you shipped flawless software, it would take you so long to develop the software that it would probably be outdated before it hits the shelves."

    And an anecdote from one of the authors:

    "Before he joined Microsoft, my manager was one of the few people to have worked on the development team of a system designed to meet the requirements of Class A1 of the Orange Book.  (The Orange Book was used by the U.S. Department of Defense to evaluate system security.  You can find more information about the Orange Book at http://www.dynamoo.com/orange.)  The high-assurance system took a long time to develop, and although the system was very secure, he canceled the project because by the time it was completed it was hopelessly out of date and no one wanted to use it."

  120. Lordmike says:

    @PatriotB

    I see now.. and yes I was quite wrong in wanting a known bugfree system.

    "Are you asserting that your company believes it has no unknown bugs?  It is highly, highly unlikely that your system has zero unknown bugs."

    Well by swedish law they are not allowed to have _any_ kown bugs in the system which controls the nuclear power plants.

    I see that this is highly unlikely, but I can’t see how they can have known bugs when by law they can’t have bugs. Not even the mechanical system is allowed to have unknown errors/faults , but if its unknown.. it’s impossible to fix it if it’s there.

    But my point is now.. I was really wrong. Thanks for the information! =)

  121. David Wrixon says:

    @Eric Law

    <<Microsoft had an internationally-enabled browser long before any other significant developer– IE5 supported UTF-8 for navigation.  There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with UTF-8, but standards bodies over the next 5 years decided to invent and adopt Punycode instead of adopting the existing standard.  Hence, IE7 is now supporting Punycode>>

    Punycode doesn’t replace UTF-8, which is a Unicode standard. Punycode replaced RACE which was a system adopted by Verisign. ICANN never adopted RACE and RACE never left the test bed, and hence there was never a requirement for it to be resolved. What changed was the system of encodement that that could be represented in less than a page of HTML. I asked Domainsite to implement this in the registration proceedure and they implemented it within a few days. All you had to do was to adopted the code as a patch for IE6. This could have been done with no fuss or bother in early 2003. The reason it wasn’t was that IE 6 was being treated with benign neglect because it wasn’t perceived as a commercial priority.

    <<<Plugins which offer Punycode support for IE have been available for many years.  Much of the "delay" in supporting IDN on Microsoft’s part was related to ensuring that users are kept safe from phishing scams that plagued early implementers, who didn’t consider the security risks inherent in IDN support (e.g. Schmoo group’s IDN spoof).>>>

    These pluggins have been available and are relatively easy to install. However, I think you will find that even in Japan the use of such pluggins is less than 1%. The adoption of alternative browsers is also very low. The reason for this is that in order to find out how to do these things you invariably have to speak English. Not incorporating the pluggin into IE 6 effectively meant that direct navigation was not an option in Asia until China started going it own way and scared everyone else sh*tless.

    The Phishing argument was always largely a red-herring. This was always ICANNs problem to resolve and they have now made good progress towards doing this. The extent of the problem was grossly overblown as most successful phishing scams have not involved IDN. It also displays a very US-centric Chauvinist attitude. The greatest risk of phishing has always been that of forcing people to navigate in Alien character sets. Only in the US did the risk of IDN potentially outweigh the benefits. This is precisely why the governance fo the internet should be taken from the US and put into the International Arena.

    <<<Asserting that third world economies were "impaired" by the unavailability of IDN browsers requires a serious stretch of both logic and the definition of a "third world economy".>>>

    Perhaps Third World wasn’t the best term. But certainly Developing Countries need technology for advancement as much as the rest of us. Only by getting technological transfer from the West can they ever hope to catch up the West. By essentially denying them direct navigation, Microsoft doomed the economies to dropping ever farther behind.

  122. AnonL says:

    @ IE Team

    Just a big thanks and "keep up the good work". I’m really looking forward to hear about speculations on the next coming version. I hope you bring that innovative spirit we got in IE5 into life again with IE8. That’s all for now.

    (Pls, read this long nonsense I wrote below with a light tone – if you’re going to, I definitely didn’t mean it to offend anyone)

    @David Wrixon

    I just appreciate how much you care about the malady one could see in the Third World economies and I just can’t sit and watch you blaming the wrong guy; inadvertently I hope!

    Since the last time I’ve checked, I’ve actually been living in one. And I wish I could give it a third place, it’s somewhere around Nth World economies and still going down. Let me tell you that from my perspective what you wrote, sadly, sounds mostly like a regular well off European indulging a pinkish bombast going at a dominant power, chiefly American, just to get a false feeling of superiority over it; which is not necessarily a bad thing. It can get annoying sometimes, but you shouldn’t expect more.

    There are a few assumptions you pointed out that seem rather off to me (and to others apparently; they all got good points). First is that economic carnage Microsoft with its IE evidently has brought upon developing nations by not supporting the IDN on time, I have to say that is off-based, little-red-riding-hood-shot-the-wolf-with-a-9mm-she-kept-in-the-basket-and-with-help-of-her-granny-they-coved-it-up-until-they-found-out-he-was-a-veggie kinda off-based, I’m not going into IDN discussion; IE7 is seemingly right on time knowing the standard was not adequately formed until ’03 and we’d better not embark on any crude standard in any widely used application. But about that disastrous fate you bemoaned, with considering millions of copies of windows, principally unlicensed (95% is a safe guess in where I live), with its latest enterprise extravagances serving for more that a decade in developing world, any sensible mined would take Microsoft as an essential drive in most – if not all – ripening economic systems that have grown over IT technology.

    For some boring history lessons, let’s see when big software firms looked into getting multilingual by supporting Unicode in their products: in UNIX-like world it happened in 1998 with Tru64 UNIX, 2001 in Mac OS and Linux glibc while it was there since 1993 in windows NT. Actually win NT is the first OS to deploy Unicode as its core string standards. In browser frontier they put it in that creepy IE3 (’96) it was the start and it was a rather lame adaptation (so was the internet; actually we still hadn’t html 4.0 shaped up back then). So when we see this monopoly in non-English speaking world we can assume the reason has been the dreaded Microsoft Monopoly Squad – a violent group of nearsighted geeks with unkempt Mohican haircuts, armed with heavily modded weapons up to their glittering gold plated bucktooth-magnifying braces, roaming over nations with troubled economies brandishing nifty guns at IT consultants threatening them to use M$ or get "blue-screened" – or their quality and suitability of product. I’d rather place my bet on the latter.

    Somehow I find it rather offensive to call a nation "developing" and still suggest that they’re all thumb when it comes to typing some English wwws in that address bar; I personally believe pushing people in one nation’s economy to learn and use some English could benefit the nation multiple times better than giving them what they’re already good at. If we truly think that the goal is to make impenetrable virtual borders over this small sphere and let people live separately, talk only in their own language, believe only in their own faith and we all will live happily ever after, we’re waiting for a rude awakening (if our past thousand years tragic history hasn’t awaked us by then). Magic of Internet is not helping nations connect to themselves but to let nations connect to each others.

    And lastly, it’s about a company and their products and it eventually comes down to personal preferences, you simply may not like Microsoft and anything related. That’s quite all right. Any day you can get rid of it, format those M$ infected machines and go unix-like and you can always come back here and brag about it (like those frolickers above). Actually it’s a good thing to see people getting excited over new experiences. That aside, it is simply a vile act to abase Gates philanthropy in any foolish sense. Perhaps for some a philanthropic figure has to be a pop star wearing topnotch shades but for me he’s the real thing. It’s quite fine if you don’t buy it. Warren Buffett bought it with 85% of his wealth and that’s what we should really care.

    Ok. Thanks for reading all this. Just looking for a shred of reason.

  123. David Wrixon wrote:

    "Microsoft’s failure to timely deliver an IDN enabled browser has almost certainly done more damage to Third World economies than any of Bill’s Philanthropy will ever be able to put right. … Everyday, it it costing those countries Millions, if not Billions of dollars. That lost development is also costing lives."

    Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

  124. tedzzz says:

    from a QA standpoint this is a mess.

    ie naming  is already a problem look at what is possible to fin on users machines now:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/164539/en-us

    rules for product name:

    1. it must be searchable on web

        – that make "+"  a bust)

        – that make new name a bust

    2. it must be easy to write up in requirements, specs,test cases and issue tracking.

         – that make new name a bust

    3, 4, 5……..? ideas

       

  125. Fehler im Explorer?

    gestern war ich bei einem Bekannten zu Besuch. Der hatte den neuen Explorer 7 beta installiert. Mit dieser Version ist es nicht möglich gewesen, auf Dateien und Ordner per FTP im Web zuzugreifen, bzw. zu übertragen, wie ich das vom Explorer 6, und den Vorgängerversionen gewohnt war. Auch ein anklicken der Schaltfläche: FTP Seite im Exploreröffnen brachte nicht den gewünschten Erfolg. Ich sehe das einen Rückschritt in der Technologie an, wenn man künftig auf solche Funktionen verzichten muss.

    Geschrieben steht:Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) Beta 3 wurde entwickelt, um die alltäglichen Aufgaben zu erleichtern, dynamische Sicherheits- und Schutzfunktionen bereitzustellen sowie die Entwicklungsplattform und die Verwaltbarkeit zu verbessern.

    eider ist mit dieser Version keine Dateiübertragung per FTP möglich gewesen, was ich nicht als eine Verbesserung, wohl aber als Einschränkung empfinde, die sehr gravierend ausfällt. Aber vielleiccht wird ja dre Fehler noch behoben….

    Übrigens, der Umstand trat auf zwei Systemen bei meinem Bekannten auf, so das ich nicht davon ausgehe, das es sich hier um einen Instalisationfehler handelt.

    Weiterhin ist es traurig, das nach der Wiederherstellung des alten Explorers der Fehler auch nicht mehr behoben ist, man muß das Betriebssystem danach neu aufspielen…

    Ich hätte gern mal gewusst, ob das beansichtigt ist, oder gwollt ist, damit man ganz normal bei FTP wie bisher keine Dataeien mehr übertragen kann, denn das funktionierte nicht mehr…

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Lothar Bennert

  126. Fehler im Explorer?

    gestern war ich bei einem Bekannten zu Besuch. Der hatte den neuen Explorer 7 beta installiert. Mit dieser Version ist es nicht möglich gewesen, auf Dateien und Ordner per FTP im Web zuzugreifen, bzw. zu übertragen, wie ich das vom Explorer 6, und den Vorgängerversionen gewohnt war. Auch ein anklicken der Schaltfläche: FTP Seite im Exploreröffnen brachte nicht den gewünschten Erfolg. Ich sehe das einen Rückschritt in der Technologie an, wenn man künftig auf solche Funktionen verzichten muss.

    Geschrieben steht:Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) Beta 3 wurde entwickelt, um die alltäglichen Aufgaben zu erleichtern, dynamische Sicherheits- und Schutzfunktionen bereitzustellen sowie die Entwicklungsplattform und die Verwaltbarkeit zu verbessern.

    eider ist mit dieser Version keine Dateiübertragung per FTP möglich gewesen, was ich nicht als eine Verbesserung, wohl aber als Einschränkung empfinde, die sehr gravierend ausfällt. Aber vielleiccht wird ja dre Fehler noch behoben….

    Übrigens, der Umstand trat auf zwei Systemen bei meinem Bekannten auf, so das ich nicht davon ausgehe, das es sich hier um einen Instalisationfehler handelt.

    Weiterhin ist es traurig, das nach der Wiederherstellung des alten Explorers der Fehler auch nicht mehr behoben ist, man muß das Betriebssystem danach neu aufspielen…

    Ich hätte gern mal gewusst, ob das beansichtigt ist, oder gwollt ist, damit man ganz normal bei FTP wie bisher keine Dataeien mehr übertragen kann, denn das funktionierte nicht mehr…

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Lothar Bennert

  127. Fredrik says:

    @moimoi, Oneda, linux, Lothar and probably more of you people…

    I come to an american blog and expect to see questions in english, not german, spanish or any other language.

    Microsoft is in Redmond, so my guess is that the IE Team there can’t understand you’re questions.

    I tried some translation tools and none of them was satisfactory enough for me to understand what you people asked for.

  128. tedzzz says:

    it aint :-) that hard…

    FTP seems to be non functional, and attempt to revert back cause an even bigger headache. was this intentional to make FTP so nonfunctional ?

    yesterday I was with an acquaintance to attendance[help?]. That had installed 7 beta for the new Explorer. With this version it was not possible to access files and files by ftp in the Web and/or to transfer , like I [was] from the Explorer 6, and the previous versions was [that were] used. Also click the switching surface [command button?]: Ftp side in the Explorer do not open brought desired success. I regard that a backward step in the technology, if one must do in the future without such functions.    Written stands: Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) beta 3 was developed, in order to facilitate the everyday tasks to make dynamic safety and protective functions available as well as to improve the development platform and the manageableness.    more eider with this version no file transmission was by ftp possible, which I not  feel is an improvement  , probably however as restriction, which appears to be very seriously. But one maybe dre errors still repaired….    By the way, the circumstance arose on two systems with my acquaintance, so which I do not assume that, which concerns it a Installation error here.    Further it is sad, which is, also not more repaired after the re-establishment of the old Explorers of the errors. one must the operating system newly thereafter up-play…    I would like to known, whether is deliberate, or purposely,  that one can not transfer   more Data  completely normally with ftp, like before, because functioned the no more…    Yours sincerely, Lothar Bennert

  129. Henry says:

    there are a lot of rumors about windows vista, anyone can tell me what’s true and what’s not??

    some say most computers wont even work with the new windows, is that true???

    http://www.cruisetopics.com

  130. ITechTips says:

    &amp;nbsp; Microsoft has decided not to use the &amp;quot;plus&amp;quot; symbol to differentiate the version of Internet Explorer (IE) 7.0 that is bundled into Windows Vista. Microsoft officials say they listened to customers (which should be the correct

  131. Pierre says:

    42 pages of comments for such an interesting piece of news. Here’s a another scoop, please don’t tell anyone about it : the next version of Firefox will be called Firefox 2, without plus or minus. Incredible, isn’t it ?

  132. Antonio says:

    Well, well, well…

    @Everyone:

    I have read almost every comment here and I realised one thing:

    Is listening to comments really bring improvement to something? If Microsoft were to take everyone’s comments, I think the naming of IE7 will never come to a conclusion. No matter how Microsoft fix the name, including changing it to "Windows Firefox Emulator 7", there will still be objections come from millions of Microsoft’s fans. And eventually, there will be no conclusion at all.

    @Microsoft:

    Trust your intelligence, trust your judgement, and finally, trust your moral. If you think your judgement will benefit the majority, just go ahead. You can still conduct the survey via the blog, but just ignore those nonsense, who has no idea how to improve their businesses but to keep criticising your products pointlessly.

    I have been your user and developer for more than 10 years, and your products never let me down. Keep it up!

    P/S: If believing how software can bring better life to human unintentionally makes you become the monopoly of the market, then just go ahead and monopolize it. God will not punish you.:)

  133. zinai says:

    je souhaite recevoir unr version d’IE7 pour XP afin d’avoir une ample idée sur ce moteur de recherche et pouvoir le juger à sa juste valeur

    Merçi

  134. zinai says:

    je souhaite recevoir unr version d’IE7 pour XP afin d’avoir une ample idée sur ce moteur de recherche et pouvoir le juger à sa juste valeur

    Merçi

  135. cj says:

    @Antonio

    i’ve also been reading all the (english) comments here, and there are a couple tips to help you find relevance here.

    1. ignore those people who only post to suck up to microsoft.

    2. ignore those people who only post hate-microsoft comments (though these are usually the most interesting).

    with those taken out, a strong and recurrent theme appears:  the name is redundant and too long, and the word change is confusing.

  136. Richard Poole says:

    Great job!

    The Visual Studio team should take a leaf out of your book and quit using names like "MSDN Premium with Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Software Developers" (no joke).

    Simpler is almost always better, and Internet Explorer 7 is a fantastic product. You’ve done yourselves proud.

  137. moshiur says:

    What is the benifit? Try to include some new features of Firefox :-)

  138. El Mostafa Ermili says:

    ok

  139. IEBlog says:

    As you may have seen on the Windows Vista blog , we released Windows Vista to manufacturing today! Wahoo!!!

  140. IE7 – Windows Vista に含まれる IE7 の名前の変更