IE7 to be distributed via Automatic Updates!


As we get close to the final availability of Internet Explorer 7, I want to provide an update on our distribution plans. To help our customers become more secure and up-to-date, we will distribute IE7 as a high-priority update via Automatic Updates (AU) shortly after the final version is released for Windows XP, planned for the fourth quarter of this year.

During the past year, we’ve discussed many of the advanced security features in IE7 that will help make our users more secure, including ActiveX Opt-in, the Phishing Filter and Fix My Settings features. These are just some of the security enhancements we’ve designed to help protect users from malicious software and fraudulent websites, and Microsoft recommends that all genuine Windows customers install IE7. To ensure users are prepared to upgrade, AU will notify users when IE7 is ready to install and show a welcome screen that presents key features and choices to “Install”, “Don’t Install”, or “Ask Me Later” (screenshots below).

We are also providing a Blocker Toolkit for our enterprise customers who may want to block automatic delivery of IE7 in their organizations; this blocker has no expiration date. Enterprise customers can download the free Blocker Toolkit from the Microsoft Download Center today. We’ve also made additional information for IT administrators available at the Windows Update/Microsoft Update site on TechNet.

Now back to how the process will work for the rest of us…

How the Automatic Updates installation process works

As I said earlier, AU will notify you when IE7 is ready to install. Alternately, you will be able to visit the Windows Update or Microsoft Update sites and obtain IE7 by performing an “Express” scan for high-priority updates. Either way, you will see the welcome screen that allows you to choose whether to install it. (Users will also be able to download IE7 from the Microsoft Download Center.)

If you decide to install IE7, it will preserve your current toolbars, home page, search settings, and favorites and installing will not change your choice of default browser. You will also be able to roll back to IE6 at any point by using Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel. Finally, users who have AU turned off will not be notified.

(To learn more about Automatic Updates please visit the Microsoft Security site)

I think this approach strikes a good balance across a couple of dimensions – helping customers become more secure, giving them control, and providing options for enterprises.

Tony Chor
Group Program Manager



Installation Experience Screenshots

Below are example screenshots of the notification experience:

IE7 update balloon tip

IE7 Automatic Updates dialog

IE7 Final Welcome screen

Note: Final Welcome screen is in draft form and still subject to change

Comments (328)

  1. Microsoft will distribute Internet Explorer 7 as a high-priority update via Automatic Updates soon after…

  2. Brandon LeBlanc and I had a chance yesterday to talk to Gary Schare, IE’s Product Manager,…

  3. Microsoftis communicating with the community ontheir plans of how theyintend todistribute Internet Explorer

  4. The IE team announced at their blog that the final build of Internet Explorer 7, which will be made available

  5. Christopher Hill says:

    Does this mean IE7 will be distributed in XP SP3?

  6. Historically, we have not changed versions of IE in Windows SPs (for instance, W2K SP4 has IE5, not IE6), but we haven’t announced any XP SP3 plans yet.

  7. Lotti says:

    Must IE 7 – Beta 3 be uninstalled first?

  8. tony says:

    How difficult will it be to revert back to IE6?

    Is it safe to assume that IE7s final release date will be near the Oct 10th end date for SP1 support?

    Can we expect to see monthly (quarterly could be acceptable) updates for IE7 much like the spyware remover? This could be an excellent means of finishing features/bugs that aren’t going to make the initial release without needing a SP or version upgrade.

  9. The IEBlog is saying Internet Explorer 7 will be distributed via Microsoft Automatic Updates (AU) as a high-priority update. They are saying the installer will be automatically downloaded for those…

  10. Steve says:

    As a Web Developer, I love this… somewhat.

    If my Lowest browser support level, was IE7, then it would be a dream.

    However seeing how many bugs and compatibility issues still exist with IE7, I see this as a nightmare for supporting various apps currently available, and web sites (web apps) too.

    Of course, there is still a ton of IE6 users on 2K that won’t benifit from this, so the need to support back to IE6 will still exist.

    Any news on the release date then? October sounds mighty soon for a Beta product to move to stable and ready to ship. Is the Q1 prediction more accurate? Will it be tied to the release of Vista?

    Thanks.

  11. Thomas Tallyce says:

    That’s great news.

    Shame that Win2K users still won’t have access to IE7’s updated rendering engine but you’ve made clear that’s not going to be supported.

  12. cooperpx says:

    Fantastic News! Exactly what I had hoped to occur.

    Again, I echo everyone else when I say I wish win2k would get this update. I suppose they can suffer using Firefox or Opera. 😉

  13. Aedrin says:

    Thank you. This will aid the future of internet greatly.

  14. Carl Knecht says:

    Interesting. If the user is not an administrator on the machine and receives this, will it work properly? With previous versions of IE, we never could get that working correctly.

    Will this be made available via WSUS as well?

    And is there going to be an optional way to suppress the splash screen and just do the install?

  15. Sebastian Redl says:

    Perhaps you can install Firefox or Opera via AU on Win2k 😉

  16. Carl Knecht says:

    Will this then be available to SMS 2003 clients via the Inventory Tool for Microsoft Updates? Or will it require a separate package like previous versions of IE did?

  17. leonardo says:

    "Uninstalling IE7 Beta Releases" comments are disabled.

    I had IE7 BETA 2 preview. I removed %windir%$NtUninstallie7bet2p$ directory.

    IE7 Beta 3 didn’t install.

    To remove previous version, delete all files from IE directory in program files, I used "unlocker" to remove undeleteble files. Then look for IE7 in registry and remove update references. Then you can install IE7Beta3.

  18. andrew mk says:

    So as a developer (web sites and applications) will I be able to install XP on a PC to test compatibility and rendering in IE6? Or will I have to fight off Automatic Updates on install, then try and slip in the Blocker Toolkit, then allow AU to continue?

    Seems like a royal PITA to me.

    Second thought, for home users, that are not aware that they may encounter compatibility issues with version 7 of IE.  Will they be presented with a warning message indicating that there is a chance that critical applications they use may become unstable or not work? Will they have the ability to uninstall if it doesn’t work for them? And when they uninstall, will AU be smart enough to not force it back on them when they next update?

  19. I hope MSIE7 will be included to Windows XP SP3 as well.

  20. Answering some of the questions posed above:

    Users can uninstall IE7 via Add/Remove Programs; this will revert the user back to IE6.

    The beta versions of IE7 need to be uninstalled before the release version is installed (we do this so if you uninstall, you get IE6, not the beta version of IE7). However, we’ve made a change so setup will do the uninstall of the beta so you don’t have to do it manually.

    IE7 will be available through SMS and WSUS.

    If you don’t want IE7 on the machine, you won’t have to "fight AU"; just click "Don’t install" and AU won’t prompt again.

  21. Graham Gosling says:

    Sounds petty straight forward. Thanks for the update. Now how about some firming up of the delivery date? :-)

  22. Mike says:

    The two reasons why Microsoft is forcing IE7 onto users are :

    – they can’t get users to be interested in this crap anymore

    – WGA (Winflaws genuine advantage) gets an alibi.

    Very nice IBM, erm… Microsoft.

  23. John Hrvatin [MSFT] says:

    Answer to an earlier question…

    Automatic Updates only offers updates to administrators, so although IE7 installation requires Administrator privilege, non-admins won’t be prompted to install IE7.

    Thanks!

    John

  24. Peter Ritchie says:

    I’ll be sticking with blocking IE 7 until significant inroads into quality have been achieved.  Every Beta I’ve tried causes most of my usage patterns to blow it up or reveal a bug.

    It’s just not usable for me.

  25. La notizia (ormai) non è freschissima: IE7 verrà distribuito come update a fine anno, usando Windows…

  26. Cameron Vetter says:

    Can I prevent this from being downloaded and installed?

  27. Streaky says:

    This is what we need to hear!

    I was starting to get the feeling that IE 7 was going to be a damn squid, but now I’m happy, force everybody, or at least give people the idea they *need* IE 7 from day one. All good stuff.

    As for the comments above (some of them at least). The keyword here is *Beta*. It’s pretty obviously going to have bugs.

  28. AJenbo says:

    I cant see why you are all scared/pissed that thers comming a new vesrion of IE and that MS is speeding up the transition.

    Once Vista gets on the market more an more IE7 will pop up any way so having it sooner then later is a good thing IM, or would you all just prefere IE 4 to be the default browser on all windows distribution?

  29. Fduch says:

    Cameron Vetter, I’m answering especially for you.

    You can "prevent this from being downloaded and installed" IF

    1) You have eyes

    2) You have brains

    3) You can read

    4) You can use computer.

  30. Brad says:

    Great news! Good to know that the install for IE7 will automatically uninstall Beta 3 before the final version of IE7 is installed.

  31. Peter van de Beek says:

    I don’t know if it’s gonna be fixed, but I still have a wrong page render here, wat was good on IE6 and every outher browser.

    It’s on the next link, and the problem is that the page isn’t been view’d properly, cause the info what’s it all about is verry empthy.

    http://gathering.tweakers.net/forum/myreact/80878

    If I should be on another page, please tell me where to put down the problem.

    Greets,

    Peter van de Beek

    The Netherlands.

  32. Cider says:

    Hey, I don’t usually complain about IE 7, but…

    This IE7 Blocker.  For crying out loud, that’s a joke.  It wont effect me because we use WSUS, but would it really be much effort to move the registry key that blocks the install from HKLMSOFTWAREMicrosoftInternet ExplorerSetup7.0DoNotAllowIE70 to HKLMSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoft….?

    At the moment, it breaks every rule of group policy, needlessly tattoos the registry, and means the best method of control you have is that, frankly rubbish, IE70Blocker.cmd script (wow, do people really use REG ADD these days?!)

  33. Umm, didn’t the 4th quarter just end June 30th?

  34. Mike says:

    Good news, here’s hoping the Final release won’t be too far off. IE 7 is the best version of the M$ browser I have used in years, even won me back from FF

  35. Mike says:

    Depends on how M$ does it, it could also end on Sept 30th

  36. rei says:

    Cool.

    Incompatible sites will have to catch up. Can’t let the whole industry be dragged behind by them. Quit whining.

  37. TechBlog says:

    When Internet Explorer 7 is finished and ready for mass-distribution, Microsoft’s going to use a potent weapon to spread it far and wide: Windows Update. But Ed Bott says installing IE7 won’t be an inevitability: If you have Automatic Updates…

  38. Jim says:

    I’m thinking about my mother…poor woman won’t know what to do. IE7 as an out-of-the-box browser it is not. I guess I will be making the long ride home to hand-hold her through this process. OR, maybe I will just install Firefox, and tell her NOT to click on the IE logo on her desktop.

    Oh crappolla! What about the ClearType bug? My mother uses a CRT monitor, AND Outlook Express. Sure you can turn off ClearType for the IE7 browser, but Outlook Express keeps the ClearType turned on after IE7 install EVEN WHEN YOU DISABLE IT SYSTEM WIDE! Well, I guess I will have to introduce mom to Thunderbird, and have her dump Outlook Express.

    I love IE7 personally, but I know to turn off ClearType in the advanced settings (I have a CRT monitor and no matter how much tweaking I do, the ClearType makes me dizzy – literally), and I don’t use Outlook Express. People like my mother, however, will freak out. I can just hear her now when she faces ClearType for the first time on her CRT monitor, "This is an upgrade? That looks awful! Is it broken? Should I call the computer repair guy?" No, Mom, just ignore it and download Firefox.

    Bottom line: Microsoft is on planet Pluto, far away from truly understanding real life scenarios involving the average computer user.

  39. z says:

    People stop complaining and get a life!!    

  40. todd says:

    you’d have to distribute it via automatic updates, because people wouldn’t download it manually. I object to Microsoft using there position to make non-critical updates on the windows update site. Other browsers don’t have the luxury of updating by this centralized system from within the OS.

  41. Christopher says:

    todd, if Apple issues Safari updates via OS updates (which they do), then MS should be able to do the same.

    Stop whining!

  42. PatriotB says:

    "Historically, we have not changed versions of IE in Windows SPs (for instance, W2K SP4 has IE5, not IE6), but we haven’t announced any XP SP3 plans yet."

    True, the IE team has traditionally not updated its version with Windows service packs.  However there is precedent to upgrading Windows "middleware" with service packs; XP SP2 included WMP 9 and Server 2003 SP1 included WMP 10 (I believe).

  43. Bill Gates says:

    If you have any concerns regarding IE7 and AU, simply set AU to Notification Mode.  That way you will only be told of IE7, and any critical updates, by AU.  You will be left to decide if you want each critical update.  There, you see, no is forced to get anything from us.

    Now bow to your king and God have mercy on your soul if your copy of Windows is pirated.

  44. BB says:

    I think this is a wise decision.

    One thing remains baffling, however.  Why not do the same with the .NET framework?  Distribute it as a vital update.  If developers could assume its presence, there’d be a more substantial migration to managed code.  Beyond a strong front, the integrity of the applications that run on Windows need to improve.  Microsoft needs to do something to stem the increasing tide of buffer overflow exploits.

  45. Greg says:

    Man I can’t wait for this nightmare IT day!

    "Tonys PC just updated Explorer… how come mine didn’t?" (admin vs. non-admin users)

    "After windows did its security updates, it changed my browser, and now site X,Y,Z don’t work!, how do I fix this?"

    "Toolbar X stopped working!, what gives?"

    "Web page X, Y, Z don’t look right anymore, everything is distorted!"

    (and because we all know MS just can’t play fair…)

    "My default web browser changed when I updated Windows! How do I stop this $#@!"

    Long story short… yes, MS should (in future) upgrade the browser, via AU. However at the moment, since IE6 to IE7 is a monumental change, forcing it on users will not go as well as planned.

    We also hope that window, between final, and the AU is wide enough, to get all the fixes done, that the final needs.  I personally wouldn’t touch a site requiring big time security within 30 days of the final launch.  I have Beta 3, and it "looks" 100% better than IE6, but under the hood? man, what a can of worms… more regression bugs than I would ever have expected, and more new bugs, from the new structure, than a modern app should have before even thinking about a final rollout.

    Was there a date posted in this thread about when the final is?  Me thinks that IT folks across the globe would like some time to prepare their battle plans, for the onslaught ahead.

  46. Michael says:

    "Historically, we have not changed versions of IE in Windows SPs (for instance, W2K SP4 has IE5, not IE6), but we haven’t announced any XP SP3 plans yet."

    Perhaps not. But in essence you did just confirm that there will be a SP3 beyond a silly lifecycle page.

  47. BestBizWare says:

    According to sources at Microsoft’s Internet Explorer Blog, Microsoft is planning to release Internet Explorer 7 in an automatic update.  The release should come sometime this October.  Microsoft is really doing a stand up job for both

  48. AC says:

    "My default web browser changed when I updated Windows! How do I stop this $#@!"

    Read the blog, the default browser will not be changed.

  49. PatriotB says:

    "But in essence you did just confirm that there will be a SP3 beyond a silly lifecycle page."

    No, he didn’t.  He said "we haven’t announced any XP SP3 plans yet".  Note the wording "any XP SP3 plans."  I interpret that to include that they haven’t even announced that there will be XP SP3.  If he would have said "We haven’t announced the plans for XP SP3 yet" taht would be different.

    That said, I think it is obvious that there will be an XP SP3.  It should have been released by now, however.  Why the heck is Server 2003 SP2 being released before XP SP3?!

  50. Tom says:

    @AC

    What greg was pointing to, was that AU has notoriously trodden on user settings, the past 3-4 AU’s being of note, changing the users default email client, when updating security holes in Outlook, & Outlook Express.

    Since this "update" would include IE changes, one can only logically presume, that MS would "accidentally" (read: Biggest air quotes ‘EVA’)

    set the users default browser to IE7.

    I actually second that thought. I will be very surprised, if they don’t "accidentally" reset the users settings.

    I mean, they are changing your cleartype settings back to fuzzytype aren’t they! Don’t recall them asking about that one…

    "Do you want us to turn on fuzzy type? It magically blurs your crisp text, by trying to calculate anti-aliasing across pixel RGB components. It will make all your text appear bold, wider than designed, and fuzzy to read on any screen. Would you like us to enable it?"

    Somehow, that dialog never made it. They helped us make that decision because some "study" found that when you pay people to do a study, they return the results you wanted.

    Funny how those work. (Get the facts, anyone?)

    Tom

  51. hAl says:

    In beta’s quite a few installing issues were detetected with modifying registry keys.

    For an AU upgrade these issues all need to be fixed.

    Are they ?

    In Beta’s quite a few issues were discovered with instable add-on’s which cause IE7 to function incorrectly or not at all after installation. Even if the add-on builders now have newer versions there is no way to know how many broken versions are still around  

    How are these add-on issues dealt with ?

    Will MS stil release an RC version before it’s final release ?

  52. TechAffected says:

    How will the automatic updates help those (like myself) who uninstalled IE7 Beta 2 to install Beta 3 but could not. Practically, I don’t have any working version of IE on my home computer right now. The half installed IE7 Beta 3 does not work and it does not uninstall either! Will the Automatic Update take care of me as well????

  53. TechAffected says:

    How will the automatic updates help those (like myself) who uninstalled IE7 Beta 2 to install Beta 3 but could not. Practically, I don’t have any working version of IE on my home computer right now. The half installed IE7 Beta 3 does not work and it does not uninstall either! Will the Automatic Update take care of me as well????

  54. Xepol says:

    I used to think automatic updates were a good thing, but now I can’t post comments on a wide number of sites from various machines with versions of IE6 and IE7.  It is REALLY bizarre, because it is not every site, just some.  

    Ironically, it includes some sites like MS’s msdn flash update page.

    Am I the only one seeing this bizarre behaviour (and if so, how the heck am I getting it on various machines with different versions of IE?).  

    I’ve had to resort to Firefox just to post comments.

  55. Thomas Tallyce says:

    I can’t believe all these people complaining. I’m a firefox-lover as much as anyone else, but to suggest that web users should continue to suffer broken old IE6 is a bit much.

    If people are running IE6 (whether or not they are using it), then IE7 should be an improvement. The sooner the old, highly broken IE6 is out of webdevelopers’ field of vision (as now Netscape 4) is, the quicker the web can move on. I don’t see this really as any much different from installing a security patch or service pack. Heavens, they even give the opportunity to downgrade from IE7->6.

    People complaining about it trying to install over Beta2 when they can’t get rid of that should be aware that installing Beta2 means installing a *beta* product, which could go wrong. If one has to reinstall, that’s the risk one takes for installing beta products.

    People complaining that it will overwrite the default browser setting should read the post.

    Well done IE Team for getting this past your management and allowing IE6’s fate to come sooner rather than later.

  56. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Aaron: 4th calendar quarter, not 4th fiscal quarter.

    @Xepol: What exactly happens when you try to post comments?  Can you mail me (ericlaw) a log?  http://www.fiddlertool.com/fiddler/help/log.asp

    @hAl: Yes, we still plan to ship Release Candidate builds before release.

    @Tom: Installing IE will not set it as the default.  Try it for yourself and see.

    @PatriotB: It’s no secret that there will be an XPSP3.  See e.g. http://news.com.com/Microsoft+XP+SP3+wont+arrive+until+07/2100-1016_3-6027741.html.  

  57. blah says:

    "Other browsers don’t have the luxury of updating by this centralized system from within the OS."

    As already said, Apple issues updates to all their software in Mac OS X through their update system, and so do Linux-based systems like Ubuntu, Suse, etc.

    It’s not a crime.

  58. Steve says:

    Actually, Microsoft HAVE confirmed there will be a SP3 for Windows XP, and given a preliminary date.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/servicepacks.mspx

    It says SP3 for Windows XP [Home/Professional] Edition is currently planned for 2H 2007. This date is preliminary.

  59. Steve says:

    Damn, Eric beat me to it! 😉

  60. Simon says:

    I’m on dial-up in Malaysia. Will there be a free IE7 installer CD made available for us genuine licensed users who don’t have the bandwidth? :)

  61. AJenbo says:

    "Historically, we have not changed versions of IE in Windows SPs (for instance, W2K SP4 has IE5, not IE6)."

    Historically you havent distribued IE as a critical WU update either 😉

    Will the new version of Outlook (seen in Vista B2) be distributed for XP as well?

    @Jim: don’t you think your mother will be atleast as confused by the switch from IE6->FireFox as IE6->IE7?

    @Tom: most designers today use a TFT monitor and has clear type or similare AA tech running.

    True that it dosn’t look to nice on a CRT and ther shoud be an option do disable it.

  62. AJenbo says:

    Oh and almost forgot, Firefox also has an autoupdate feature, granted you will have to run FireFox now and then (witch you would if you like it and use it to surf), but realy thers not much difference.

  63. steven says:

    Best browser yet. Easy to use, pretty stable even for a beta! Hope it will be released soon so I can distribute it over our network.

  64. Xepol says:

    @EricLaw [MSFT] -> I would love to mail a log to you, except for two problems.  The first is a lack of address, and clicking on your name to get your profile redirects to the main blog page instead.  The second problem is that NOTHING happens, so there is nothing to log.  I might as well be clicking on dead screen.  The cancel button works, but the submit button seems to be totally non functional for some pages, with no pattern I can clearly decern.

    A few pages this happens on :

    1. http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=5205766 which leads to https://www.microsoft.com/resources/msdn/subscription.aspx once you log in.  The "Customize my flash" does nothing when I click it, cancel works as expected.

    2. http://blogs.borland.com/nickhodges/archive/2006/07/25/26236.aspx  clicking on submit neither works if I have an account on the site OR use the anonymous post.

    Again, clicking on the submit does seem to trigger validation, but does not cause any browser activity.  Checking the source of the page doesn’t seem to throw up any huge red flags (of course, I haven’t inspected ALL related javascripts attached to the pages, as that can get rather lengthty)

    I have replicated this on my main XP Sp2 with IE7b3 machine, a secondary station used by my wife runnig XP sp2 and IE7B3, and also an XP Sp1a with IE6sp1 running inside a VPC, and inside a VPC running Server 2003 Web sp1 with IE 6 sp1.

    I can test from a totally different site tommorow and let you know.

  65. Xepol says:

    @EricLaw -> Interestingly, the customization page for canadian MSDN Flash works flawlessly.

  66. Frederik says:

    Are there any known statistics about Windows Update? How many people (percentage) are using Windows Update? How fast does the average user update his software?

    I’d like to know that to build a plan for updating my designs and (java)scripts.

  67. Maltpress says:

    Hmmm.  In principle I like the idea.  As has been pointed out, it’ll be nice to get more people on to a browser with better compliance so we can start having a bit more fun with design and less shouting and hacking around CSS issues.

    My big issue, though, is browser-specific tools – like, for example, content management systems.  Until the big CMS I’m using is patched or updated we can’t allow content editors to update their browsers – because if they do, they can’t keep our website up to date.  It’s fine that we can block the update and educate users not to update yet – but couldn’t the automatic update be held off for a while after the release just to make extra sure?

  68. hAl says:

    @maltpress

    Any CMS builder should already from the IE7 beta 2 lay-out complete version be verifying and if nescesary adapting their software.

    CMS builders that aren’t ready in 3 or months or so when IE7 might be released must have been sleeping.

  69. Aedrin says:

    There are 3 types of people complaining:

    1. People who don’t like Microsoft because they are Microsoft.

    2. People who have a pirated copy of Windows

    3. People with double standards.

    And yes, non-experienced people have a lot more trouble using Firefox than Internet Explorer. So forcing them to switch to Firefox is a larger crime (especially when they use a different computer, as there is a large (80%) chance it isn’t installed).

    Still amused by the people who don’t read any of the post or the comments and just post something so that they complained.

  70. Andrew says:

    Typical Damn Micro$oft, Forcing their crap onto us whether we like it or not, full to the brim of security holes and bloatware.

    Damn them all.

    :)

  71. Upanisad says:

    Thumbs up for Microsoft and their braveness. IE6 is way too old and has to go!

    Forcing the upgrade to the users may be rude, but it’s frankly needed! How can you still use IE6 nowadays? Come on!

    The new Web 2.0 needs a more up-to-date and standard-compliant browser. (And probably that’s what Microsoft itself needs for their Live.com services and simlar projects!)

  72. Robert says:

    Internet Explorer 7 review continuing

    by Robert G Parent

    IE 7 changes the mp3’s it downloads to your computer. It takes the title of the post and renames the mp3 to the title of the post. This can be good for some files where the title of the files are a weird long stream of numbers and letters.

    And it changes the file format to a format that windows can read. For example, one of the "CommandN" feeds is in the xvid avi file format. IE 7 changes it to a regular avi file. I also have a feed where the content is in .mov files. IE 7 changes the file to an mpeg file that the Windows Media player can play.

    IE 7 downloads the podcasts into the temporary internet files and no easy way to access the files. They do have a view files button when you click on "view feed properties" , but you need to open IE everytime and the "view files" button doesn’t work all the time. But what I did, I clicked on "view files", a window pops up marked "Enclosure". I went up one level up, right clicked on the folder and made a shortcut to my desktop. The IE team should make that process a little easier.

    The folders that the audio or video files are in can also be named differently ( like with the titles of the feed ) what the folders are titled now is with a long string of numbers and letters.

    Also, when you delete these folders it seems that IE 7 will download the files again. I don’t know if this happens all the time, but I’ve had two feeds that this happened too.

    I still love IE 7. It’s cool and different looking. I get to keep an eye on when my feeds update in real time. I can easily save my feeds in an opml file. I run IE 7 with my shields up ( security on high ) It’s cool.

    Bob

  73. Noble Byron Mason III says:

    no comment on something that isn’t proven and has security faults

  74. Robert Curtis says:

    I have been trying out IE7 for a few months now.    I have had a number of problems here at work. Everytime I have to change my passwork on the network, IE7 connectivity fails.  I have tried uninstalling and ended up with a corrupted version of IE6. So I downloaded the latest IE6, deleted all files, deleted registry entries and reinstalled. Still does not work.,  I finally reinstalled IE7 beta 3 and got access back.  By the way I am on a proxy and behind a firewall. As soon as I rebooted, I lost my ability to connect.  I have to reinstall each time to get IE7 to connect again…sucks!!!

    I’ll stick to Firefox!

  75. Robert Curtis says:

    I have been trying out IE7 for a few months now.    I have had a number of problems here at work. Everytime I have to change my passwork on the network, IE7 connectivity fails.  I have tried uninstalling and ended up with a corrupted version of IE6. So I downloaded the latest IE6, deleted all files, deleted registry entries and reinstalled. Still does not work.,  I finally reinstalled IE7 beta 3 and got access back.  By the way I am on a proxy and behind a firewall. As soon as I rebooted, I lost my ability to connect.  I have to reinstall each time to get IE7 to connect again…sucks!!!

    I’ll stick to Firefox!

  76. Lorne Babcock Sr. says:

    Once again, Microsoft is shafting everyone.  There was a time when it was possible to download these updates, save them in the file, and install them at some later time.  Now, because I suspect that Mr. Gates needs more money for his foundation, Microsoft is struggling to increase their revenue stream, so the share price will go up and when Bill sells his shares he can get more money for his foundation.  I suspect that he is unable to realize that the more angry he makes us, the great unwashed, the less sales he will have.  He will never stop piracy so all of this is just an annoyance.

    I will never permit Microsoft or anyone else to come along and poked their nose into my system and to install spy ware on the computer.  I just never download any updates anymore.  I paid, in good coin of the realm, for my software and I will never, never, never go begging on bended knee asking of its okay to use that which I have just paid for and which is therefore, in law, mine.

    Firefox and Thunderbird work extremely well.  Mr. Gates, you can take your validation process and shove it were the sun doesn’t shine.

    Hopefully, in the not-too-distant future, someone will come up with an alternate operating system and Microsoft will hopefully disappear into the sunset and not a moment too soon.

  77. As our IE7 product team (PG) is getting ready to launch 4th qtr this year, they are also discussing what…

  78. Mary Sue Boyer says:

    This is great news.  Everyone should have IE7 as it is the best browser hands down.  Thank you Microsoft for this most excellent and low cost piece of software!

    Web Developer

  79. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    Xepol: My email name as provided is "ericlaw" and I work for Microsoft, so my email address should be easy to guess.  :-)  I try to avoid spelling it out directly because the little spam bots just love it when I make it easy for them.  

    Do you have Script Errors configured for display (Tools | Internet Options | Advanced)?

  80. The IE team have announced on their blog that when it is finalized, IE 7 will be pushed out via Windows…

  81. IE 7 is coming and it will be delivered as a required update by Windows Update.

    This is another…

  82. tecnoticias says:

    Según el IEBlog, ahora que está cerca el lanzamiento de la versión final de Internet Explorer 7, Microsot ha cambiado su política de distribución y actualización de su navegador

    Un sistema automático de actualizaciones (como el utilizado por firefox y opera entre otros) avisará a los usuarios que se encuentra lista y disponible para la descarga una nueva versión del navegador y mostrará en la pantalla las nuevas características o mejoras que se instalarán. El usuario contará con las posibilidades de cancelar la actualización o postergarla.

  83. ranti says:

    Using the IE7 B3 as it is:

    Did quick and dirty tests on LexisNexis, EBSCO, Factiva, JSTOR, and our university online library catalog.  Works fine so far.  

    I like the additional tabs because I’m used to FF and Opera.  

    The phising-filter seems causing accessing the test sites takes longer.

    The rendered fonts (both serif and sans-serif types) are fuzzier and I have to squint my eyes.  It tires me.

  84. Jim Clark says:

    It’s a shame I have to advise some of my clients that they’ll have to TURN OFF automatic updates until their software companies are willing to support IE7!

  85. twocents says:

    If MS cared so much about the security issues related to IE 6 – they really ought to strongly recommend that customers who do *not* qualify for this update should download and install Firefox or Opera right now.

    You don’t call an upgrade "High Priority" and also make it an "Automatic Update" unless IE 6 is unsuitable for any desktop environment – corporate or otherwise.

  86. Koen says:

    One question… When?

  87. Worst idea ever after rebranding WinFX to .NET Framework 3.0, I can smell the lawsuits from far.

    If I install Windows XP out of the box and enable security updates, I want the real security updates to be isntalled on my system and not a complete upgrade of my browser.

    This is a very agressive move of Microsoft which will result in millions of people installing IE7. This aggresive approach will be the subject of the next major lawsuit. But hey as Microsoft you can just pay the fine but in the meanwhile you guys "forced" the new browser to millions of people.

    Don’t get me wrong I am Microsoft fan but that doesn’t mean I have to like this approach.

    Delivering IE7 as a high security update means that IE6 should be thrown away right now for being so leaky.

  88. twocents says:

    (previous post below was apparently deleted, so am reposting…)

    If MS cared so much about the security issues related to IE 6 – they really ought to strongly recommend that customers who do *not* qualify for this update should download and install Firefox or Opera right now.

    You don’t call an upgrade "High Priority" and also make it an "Automatic Update" unless IE 6 is unsuitable for any desktop environment – corporate or otherwise.

    In fact, MS should recommend that all users of IE 6 install Opera or Firefox until IE 7 is available.

    (I hope this post does not disappear again….)

  89. Aedrin says:

    "If MS cared so much about the security issues related to IE 6 – they really ought to strongly recommend that customers who do *not* qualify for this update should download and install Firefox or Opera right now."

    That makes sense, because users are stubborn and want to stay in the past, they are supposed to recommend the competition. Business Logic 101?

    I wish people would stop complaining about Microsoft as if they are bringing down the world…

  90. IE7 を自動更新で提供します

  91. Tony says:

    @twocents

    MS won’t recommend FF or Opera as a security upgrade for IE6. They will recommend that you upgrade the operating system.

    Support for IE5.5 ended December 31st 2005, 98 and ME ended on July 11th 2006, XP SP1 ends October 11th. Mainstream support of 2000 ended June 30th 2005. At any point have you seen MS recommend users of 2000 install FF or Opera because IE6 SP1 is no longer secure? They may have, but I don’t recall seeing it, but I have seen a plethora of requests to upgrade to XP SP2.

    Besides FF has it’s own share of bugs and security holes. The difference is the Mozilla community seems to be able to plug the holes much faster than MS can do the same for IE. Same applies to W3C standards.

    What AU needs to do is provide a disclaimer similar to this:

    IE6 SP1 support ends on xx/xx/xx and IE SP2 support ends on xx/xx/xx, to continue to received all your IE security updates we recommend installing IE7 today.

    Click here to view an interactive simulation of the all new interface and features.

    Install | Don’t Install | Remind Me Later

    Education is key. I work in a broadband support center and I am already experiencing a number of issues followed by complaints since we no longer support Windows 98 or ME. I am really concerned about our call volume when IE7 is pushed to the masses. If Microsoft can provide enough support on use of IE7 prior to install then we aren’t going to be caught between a rock and a hard place when we start receiving questions about it as well.

    Of course providing a techdoc on uninstalling IE7 and reinstalling IE6 without the need for reg edits and the like would be useful. Because I can guarantee we are going to receive a number of such requests.

  92. You'd think that coughing up $1.1 billion

    in small bills to Californians upset about its anticompetitive behavior

    would make Microsoft more cautious about its business tactics– not to

    mention the recent pledge it made to play nice. But no.<a

  93. George Portman says:

    I would suggest to wait atleast 3 months (better would be 6 months) after the final version is released to push the automatic update. This way most of the bugs would have identified and also enough user base is created for new hacks to come out.

    If possible MS can start the push from other countries and end in US finally.

    I think it would be a great PR blunder if Microsoft act agressive to push it soon and as a microsoft shareholder i hope it will not.

  94. Marc says:

    Good to hear.  This will guarantee more Firefox users when millions of people force-receive an update to IE7 that inevitably will be incompatible with thousands of websites people use on a regular basis.

    Just imagine all the businesses that use behind-the-firewall intranet applications, 90-99% of which have most likely not been tested in IE7.  One day all their computers auto-update to IE7 and suddenly their operations-essential program isn’t working.

  95. George Portman says:

    The previous comment by Marc should be noted, even though i dont beleive this will help firefox …Waiting for 6 months or so after the final IE7 version is released also gives time for the webmasters to check their site for IE7.

    So there will not be any surprise upsets when its finally automatically pushed to the millions of users.

    As i said even after waiting 6 months Microsoft would start from other countries and finally do it in US which obviously is the most important market (i mean financially).

  96. jar56 says:

    wow, I honestly don’t care. Opera and Firefox are much much better browsers and I’m going to continue using them.

  97. joel says:

    @Mary Sue Boyer

    "This is great news.  Everyone should have IE7 as it is the best browser hands down.  Thank you Microsoft for this most excellent and low cost piece of software!

    Web Developer"

    What a crock! man I wish there was a "MS Fanboy" flag on the posts here, to filter this garbage out.

    1) if you are a web developer, then we know you are lying. Web developers prefer tools that are capable, reliable, and that see development lifecycles that don’t disapear for half a decade.

    2) i don’t think you could have been doing any more kissing in that post. "best hands down"? yeah, whatever…. try reading the posts here about all the bugs, crashes and problems people are having…. if you are a web developer, surely the lack of CSS support is driving you up the wall, and oh the abundance of developer tools for IE7…. oh wait, _NOT_ i meant Firefox, they actually have some.

    Grow up, and go blog on Channel 9!

  98. While no-one can predict the outcome, end-users and sys-admins are likely to find the upgrade an easy and attractive offer. Unlike, say, Firefox 2 and the promise of JavaScript 1.7, it looks like we can expect a rapid turn from bleeding edge to established installation, and website and webapp developers should take note.

    In the meanwhile, there’s the IE7 Readiness Toolkit for testing purposes.

  99. nick botulism says:

    this would be awesome news, if IE7 weren’t such a disaster in the user interface department…

  100. From a web development platform perspective, this is a good move. It should update automatically just like Firefox etc so that security issues can be fixed, forget an old school release. It should update automatically often and to resolve security issues.

  101. sonia says:

    how awful. More monopoly

  102. technogran says:

    How about including in IE7 before you release it, the ability to automatically import your ISP and any other connection settings as well? Firefox does this, and it saves the user having to mess about setting these.

  103. Rob Lockhart says:

    The only problem I see with forcing an IE7 upgrade is that there are a couple’a sites I’ve hit that won’t allow me to use IE7 … stating that I must be using IE6 to access the site.  Most notable of these is the renewal site for the Microsoft Action Pack.  I had to go find a machine that still had IE6 on it last month to do my renewal.  I assume all such Microsoft programs sites will be fixed by the time of the update to permit the use of IE7.

  104. Aedrin says:

    @joel:

    If you are a real developer, not a Dreamweaver/Frontpage user then you should know that this is part of the internet. This has been around since the Netscape and IE war and probably will stay here.

    I don’t think you realize how hard it is to change a product like Internet Explorer. It’s not just a 4 week project thrown together. Every small change requires large amounts of testing to ensure it stays compatible with all technologies they support.

    On a side note, where do people get the idea that IE is going to "break the entire internet"? Sure, there may be a few websites that were developed with hacks/bad HTML, but do you blame your errors on the compiler?

  105. Tried IE7 Beta. It trashed my system including wiping out my F: partition along with data contained there.

    My partitions were created with "Partition Magic 8". It appears that IE7 doesn’t recognize those partitions.

    Have recreated my F: partition and restored my OS with IE6 from an image file I had on my external HD.

  106. Josh says:

    Yet another reason why I bought a MAC :)

  107. abc says:

    As non gunuine users can still use Automatic Updates for Windows, will IE7 also be available to these users as it is distributed using this system?

  108. Red Foreman says:

    You dunb ass…..read the previous postings before asking the same question over and over.

  109. Matt Dockerty says:

    This is great news for Web developers since it speeds the transition towards all browsers on the market supporting the same standards.

  110. Lynn A says:

    I’ve only been using for a short time but I have not run into any problems and like the ease of use. My experience is as a home user and employee not in the IT field.

    Since it takes some getting used to even for experienced users, I feel it should probably be an optional download until all the bugs are worked out. So far, I haven’t come across any but reading the above, apparently others are.

  111. Dan says:

    Fortunately automatic updates is off here. Quite frankly I don’t want your new browser on my system for as long as I can possibly keep it that way. You have pretty much taken away user controls and customizability and for that I’ll stick with IE6 when I need it. These days it’s mostly Firefox for me anyway but just the same I do use IE occasionally and prefer to have things the way I like them, not someone else, particularly the toolbars.

  112. s says:

    firefox ftw

  113. Club says:

    Thank heavens! IE6 is really, really, bad. seriously. Altohgh I think the world will be shocked when their glitchy IE6 gets replaces with IE7.

    Also, you need to include some firefox-extention-like-stuffs like adblock, tab mix plus, ect. And get rid of that annoying mini tab by the real ones! <_<

  114. I seriously don’t understand the ones cheering the force update of IE7. As I mentioned in my earlier posts I am a Microsoft Fanboy as someone pointed out but I seriously don’t like this agressive strategy.

  115. IEBlog says:

    I’ve been getting questions from folks lately who are wondering what will happen to IE6 (SP1) when…

  116. The final release of IE7 is fast approaching … and I mean really fast … and will be delivered to customers

  117. TechBlog says:

    Scott Graff writes at the IE7 Blog that the final release of Internet Explorer 7 is almost upon us — as in, this month. He also reveals a little more about how its distribution through Windows Update will be handled:…

  118. Alpha's Blog says:

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  119. After a while, Microsoft IE is back in the spotlight. According to the Microsoft Internet Explorer Blog, the final versio…

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  129. Microsoft announced that they will distribute IE7 in the &quot;4th quarter of 2006&quot; as a High Priority

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  131. Kelly White says:

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  132. Dominic says:

    I received the following email the other day. I guess many are already familiar with IE7 but perhaps

  133. Internet Explorer 7 for Windows XP Available Now For those of you who haven’t heard yet, we’re going

  134. El del CRM says:

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  135. IEBlog says:

    Now that IE7 has released, I want to remind everyone about the plan we announced back in July to distribute

  136. I’ve had a number of people ask me about Internet Explorer 7, which was released last week . It is currently

  137. IEBlog says:

    We have received a bunch of questions about the Automatic Updates (AU) distribution process for IE7 and

  138. As our IE7 product team (PG) is getting ready to launch 4th qtr this year, they are also discussing what

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