A New IE Add-on Site


Hi, I’m Tina Duff one of the IE Program Managers focused on improving the customer experience around IE – including the IE add-on web site. It sounds simple, but this means ensuring that wherever IE is talked about on Microsoft.com, it’s technically correct, easy to navigate, and provides the information customers want. We quickly realized that we should do a better job making all the great add-ons to IE that developers have created easier to find and download. Thus the new IE add-on site was born…

We’re excited to announce our new site at www.ieaddons.com. The site has two objectives: to make it easier for users to find valuable add-ons and to promote our partners who develop add-ons. On the new site we partnered with CNET to compile an extensive list of add-ons that make browsing with IE more productive, fun and safe. At the same time, we’ve worked to streamline the search and download process, added web feeds for the most popular and newest add-ons, and included editorial and user reviews to provide as much feedback to you as possible before you install an add-on. Customers can access the add-on site from the “Tools” menu and from the “Manage Add-ons” interface.

Products on the site either work directly with Internet Explorer 6 or 7, or use the IE platform, and have to meet the CNET Software Submission Requirements and Adware and Spyware Policy before being posted. We also welcome users, editors and industry specialists to write and post reviews for each add-on, and report problem software.

If you’re a developer it’s really easy to submit your Add-on, just follow the instructions below:

How to Submit an Add-on

You can have your add-on included by submitting it through the Internet Explorer Add-on site and you no longer have to be a member of the Microsoft Partner program to be included. You’ll also have the ability to get feedback from users that you can use to gain insight on what is working and what can be improved with your product. Here is the information you need to submit your add-on for review.

Getting Started:

  1. Learn more about the options available for listing your package. Read the Product Information Requirements, Software Submission Requirements and Adware and Spyware Policy for information on the types of products that are eligible for inclusion on the IE Add-on site.
  2. Go to http://ieaddons.upload.com to begin the submission process. If you already have an account with upload.com you can log in with that information.

We think the add-on site is pretty cool whether you’re a user or a developer – it’s a lot easier to use.  Let us know what you think and which add-ons you think are priceless.

 – Tina

Comments (100)

  1. Tim says:

    My only suggestion is that there should be some clear way to filter the add-ons by their price. One of the great things about going to the list of firefox extensions is that they’re all free and you can use them.

    It would be useful to have a similar list for IE – i think it would help drive the adoption of the add-on model by us more tech-savvy folks.

  2. David Carrington says:

    The menus that don’t work without JavaScript are a nice touch.

  3. BlakeHandler says:

    So MSIE "Add-ins" are now called "Add-ons" ???

  4. Mr. Wilson says:

    That is a really, really poorly designed website. What’s with all of the unnecessary JavaScript? What’s with pretending the page is constructed using XHTML, when it is clearly not? What’s with… well, I could continue, but I suspect you don’t care. If you did, you wouldn’t have presented the website to the world as though it were something to be proud of.

  5. maroy says:

    Is there any new documentation related to creating add-ons for IE7? I am looking for a programming interface that will let me enumerate/interact with the browser tabs.

  6. hAl says:

    @Tim

    On the advanced search you can select the license type:

    http://www.ieaddons.com/Search.aspx

    There you can select for searches on only freeware or shareware licenses

  7. Jeff Parker says:

    I am pretty much with maroy. You know what would be nice is an IE add in blog and some just basic begining samples, maybe something in the coding for fun dev center. Kind of like the Vsip blogs.

    The IE Add in documentation is something that can really be improved upon in MSDN it is sketchy at best. Maybe a .net SDK or something for IE and IE only. For example some of the browser commands and hooking in especially with .net. The web browser control in .net is useful and you can drop it into a windows app and go through the DOM and so on but it would be much better to just add your add-on to IE itself.

    The feeds api seems to be great and well designed documented and examples of using it but I submitted bugs back in beta of the 2.0 framework about things not working. Come to find out IE would swallow exceptions and so on as well. There is no documentation of this and I had to talk this through with the MS person handling the bug before I would drop it and let the bug be closed. Now don’t get me wrong there is great documentation on how IE renders and html and heck even more obscure development like in SMILE for IE, but add in development itself seems to be really lacking. For example if I wanted to create my own toolbar. I end up searching all through the web looking all over and piecing together stuff. I know there is an SDK for IE, but it is stuck way down deep in the Platform SDK’s or at least that is the only place I have been able to find it. When you want to make something for IE and IE only to improve how you surf the web who wants to dig through the entire platform SDK heck that is 398 megs compressed. We all know IE is integrated into the OS but can’t you create a different SDK just for IE and actually developing for it.

    There is docs here http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/browser/ext/extensions.asp but again this is quite a lot of hoops we have to jump through to try to create an addin in C# since there is no documentation or example of it I can find. I mean now we are making our .net code com compliant and  have to roll up our own interfaces. Not only that we have to register them in the registry. There just has to be easier ways.

  8. hAl says:

    Clearly what is lacking is the information on how to build the extentions. Amazing so many are build anyways with that little documentation available.

    This seems to be the main link for add-ons documentation:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/browser/ext/extensions.asp

    However a tutorial and an example add-on would definitly be a big big enhancement to such an add-ons site.

  9. Jeff Parker says:

    Oh yeah, and if you are wondering why I want this ability. Easy enough I want to make a pretty robust cookie manager. I want to know what sites are writing and reading what cookies and so on. Something IE doesn’t have and not something I am just going to go download somewhere or pay money for easy enough to build myself. I can do this using the webbrowser control and sticking IE in my app, but then I have to recreate everything else IE does.

  10. FusionGuy says:

    Unfortunately, the vast majority are not free.  

  11. Simon Jesseu says:

    "We think the add-on site is pretty cool whether you’re a user or a developer."

    The new site <a href="http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ieaddons.com%2F">doesn‘t validate</a>, which is really not very reassuring. And it’s not as if XHTML 1.0 Transitional is a <em>very</em> difficult standard to validate against, is it? Are all those tables in the markup absolutely necessary? And why do you need all that JavaScript?

    Does any of that fancy media stuff work without me having to click a stupid button on an alert box?

  12. Steve says:

    Hi, IE7 team,

    I am new to this blog, so I don’t know if I have posted in the right place, but perhaps you could help me anyway.

    I had downloaded the IE7 beta and really did like it, but when I tried to edit webpages using MSFrontPage 2003, FrontPage would open but not load the page (it does open web pages and HTML files, but does not allow FP as the web editor, even though there is an Edit with MSFP option. I kept getting a Windows box that said, ‘FrontPage has encountered an error and needs to close. Sorry for the incovenience.’ Yes, its a genuine copy of MSFP, but I installed it separately from my Office 2003 Student and Teacher Edition. Not loading MSFP 2003 in IE7 (for editing) is problematic for me because I am developing a survey for online distribution and am using FP (as part of a doctoral dissertation). Any suggestions to fix this error? I had to remove IE7 and reboot to restore IE6. This problem never occurred in IE6, and did not occur after IE6 was restored. Not using IE7 is a shame because I really did like it and hope to upgrade to Vista when its released commercially, but will the new Vista web technology (I know FP is going away in Office 12) be able to open and edit old FP files.

    Steve

  13. Alex Lein says:

    Wow.  I’m not sure who coded the add-ons site, but wow.  I have only once been speechless at HTML, and that was cause by NetObjects Fusion many years ago.

    It’s like the author knows of modern coding practices, yet chose some kind of odd hybrid of new-school and old-school and hackery!  Divs that conatin Tables that contain empty Divs mimicking the Anchor tag?  Amazing… but pretty!  馃檪

  14. Jim B says:

    I wonder why fiddler and the developer toolbar didn’t make the add-on list???

  15. Dave P says:

    It’s really quite discouraging that it doesn’t seem that a single person at microsoft has the ability or knowledege (’cause really, it isn’t that hard) to code a valid, standards based, non-table layout site.

    Hell, a simple peek over at a list apart would sort out those javascript-laden tab menu.

    If you guys are looking for people, there are a lot of people who would be willing to help out, including myself.

  16. Scott says:

    Is it just me, or are a lot of the "addons" actually separate programs that merely use the WebBrowser control?

  17. Luis says:

    Tabs don’t appear on this version! in previous beta worked tabs worked fine. Such a huge company with thousands of great programmers can’t make a simple web browser work ok? there’s to many bugs, including rendering problems.

  18. Xepol says:

    I can’t even begin to describe how hard it is to write IE addons.  Firefox clearly doesn’t have this problem as everyone and their dog have written plugins.

    I’ve said before that IE needs clear, simple dotNet based surfaces we can code against.  FireFox also has Javascript plugins, and that’s got to be a must also.

    IE’s plugins have languished because they are so hard to code for.  Just look at the files presented.  Download managers, which run OUTSIDE of IE, activeX components that have run inside of IE since forever.  

    MS makes it too damn hard for just anyone to write a plugin.  Just getting a toolbar can be a major episode, seriously language bound to C++ requiring you support numerous, poorly documented interfaces.

    We need better,simpler APIs to code against.  It is great that there is so much power available, but the simpliest example of a button labeled hello world requires that we know and exploit ALL of that power.  The curve is much MUCH too steep.

    I would love to code a replacement for the quicklinks toolbar, because it doesn’t work the way I want, but I’m a delphi programmer.  There are NO succesful delphi examples (the one attempt at a generic framework for delphi results in total hell!)

    No no, no, a THOUSAND TIMES no, this should NOT be the problem it is.  Simplify, simplify, simplify.

    And PLEASE improve the system so that when developing you don’t have to reboot or crash your whole damn shell over and over and over just to test and recompile.  Plugins should be flushed the pico-second they are turned off.

    I can’t imagine how you got to this point?  Imagine having to continually restart word or visual studio every time you tweaked a script!  MS has the skills, it needs to be applied.

    Let us write dotNet assemblies, let us write javascript/vb script plugins, reduce the language barriers, and DOCUMENT the interfaces properly.

    Not everything requires the complexity of a rocket launch.

    Look at the plugins for Firefox, see what real plugins can do.

    PLEASE!!!!

    Until then, the ie add on site will just be a repository of antique software without any real new innovation (I would be suprise if you get ANY submissions for plugins written recently)

  19. Nidonocu says:

    Echoing Jeff Parker and Xepol here, downloading IE7 and seeing the Add-ons function and website I thought. ‘Oh, I’ve been learning C#, maybe I can have a go at writing a Hello IE extension and build from there. Maybe make some nice tweaks or build a little add-in to interact with my own application in development. Heh.. no, the documentation in some places don’t look like its been updated since IE5. I hope the API and documentation team get a kick in the rear to improve stuff for both .net and Javascript programmers or else we won’t see any of the best extentions on Firefox ever ported to IE.

    Applogies for spelling, my Google Toolbar for IE7 isn’t working correctly right now. 馃槓

  20. Tina Duff, one of&amp;nbsp;the Internet Explorer Program Managers has announced on the IEBlog the new website…

  21. veen says:

    This is great news. Under the developer section I would like to see links to an example add-on as well, or getting started on creating an add-on as well. I think there isn’t much around being able to create an add-on – specifically using C# or VB.NET would be useful…

  22. Ron says:

    Interesting that the IE team is trying their "best" to upgrade support for CSS yet for some reason you still don’t know the right way to change cursors.

    Let me tell you something, the value "hand" is not part of the CSS spec, so do not use it!

  23. krisdb says:

    Why the hell would anyone pay for IE "add-ons" when you can get Firefox with free extensions, which do the same thing?  Then again, anyone dumb enough to use IE would be dumb enough to pay for extensions.  More proof Microsoft is clueless when it comes to the Internet.

  24. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    Hi, all.  I’m happy to see the feedback on the Add-ons site, and I’m excited that maybe we’ll see some new ones from you folks as well.

    Before I joined the IE team, I used to write plugins for IE, and I’m very aware of how challenging it can be.  I wrote a few pretty popular addons over the years: http://www.bayden.com/popper was the most popular, with around a million total users worldwide.  It was written in Delphi, which was my development language of choice at the time.

    Last week, I wrote a BHO for IE in C++ and while it’s definitely not trivial, I’m not really a C++ programmer at heart.  

    There are ~tons~ of ways to extend IE in powerful ways that don’t require C++ or even COM.  I blogged about some of them back in September: see http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/09/06/461675.aspx for more information.

    My recent non-C++ are the IEToys (http://www.bayden.com/ietoys) a trivial collection of Javascript powerups, and a C# toolbar built using the cool .NET Band Objects sample code I linked in the blog above.  Writing toolbars in C# is super-easy, and I was able to build my toolbar with MUCH less effort than my Delphi work in years past.

    Now, with all of that said, we obviously have a ways to go.  Tons of plugins have been built over the years.  We never had a central place to advertise them, so there are lots of duplicated/half-hearted efforts out there from many folks who built something not because they wanted to, but because they didn’t know of any good alternatives.  For instance, there are literally ~dozens~ of popup blockers of varying quality out there for IE6.

    Our documentation hasn’t kept up with the times, so most of the examples out there are a few years old.  We definitely need newer examples, and we’ve been pretty open to linking to great examples from the community (for instance, the Mouse Gestures plugin is a great example for ATL, and the Band Objects example is a great .NET sample).

    Beyond that, we know we need to come up with a simpler programming model for plugins.  For the next versions of IE, we’re very interested in your feedback on this: What is your ideal development experience?  What’s the right balance between security, simplicity and power?  

    @Jim: Fiddler and the Developer toolbar will be listed on the Add-ons site shortly.

  25. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Maroy: I’m afraid that tabs are not exposed to extensibility in the IE7 release.  In IE7, each tab gets its own set of toolbars/bhos, in order to support the legacy bhos and toolbars that never expected to be running in a tabbed browser.  For a future release, it would make sense to offer interfaces to the tabsets and to permit toolbars or BHOs that are only loaded once per IE instance instead of once per tab.

    @FusionGuy: "Unfortunately, the vast majority are not free."

    Until relatively recently, Upload.com charged a monthly fee to list software, and hence many freeware authors (myself included) chose not to publish all of our work there.  Now, there’s no charge to get a listing at IEAddons.com, so I expect we’ll see quite a lot of freeware listed there shortly.

  26. Xepol says:

    Eric -> It might be interesting to see a move between Firefox and IE to create a standardized interface for some plugins.  

    A toolbar can easily be HTML+javascript based if it is considered to be in the local zone.  Of course, it would be nice for that to be  reusable OS component for others as well -> probably wishful thinking there.

    At a bare minimum, IE should be able to load dotNet assemblies with project wizards (toolbars, sidebars, toolbarbuttons etc etc) for VS, including the express version making it possible for anyone to develop them.

    Honestly, a toolbar button should be as easy as a button image, a button label and an execution target (javascript: / vbscript, or a native EXE for simple tasks, or a dotNet assembly with access to the DOM of the document).  Toolbars and sidebars might point to an HTML document to be rendered with an object reference back to the main object.

    And all this without needing to be a rocket scientist.

  27. adrianotiger says:

    My english is bad…

    But the one who call IE-add-on all internet tools has also some english problems!

    THEY ARE NOT ADD-ONS!!!!!!

  28. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Xepol: "Honestly, a toolbar button should be as easy as a button image, a button label and an execution target (javascript: / vbscript, or a native EXE for simple tasks"

    Toolbar buttons and menu items really are that simple– just set a few registry keys.  See my prior blog post for details.  You can build more complicated COM stuff if you want, but you don’t have to.

    I agree that some native wizards for VS2005 would be pretty neat.  Let me ask around.

  29. Riva says:

    Having software listed that in no way relates to IE significantly degrades the intent of the site.

    Please don’t pollute the meaning of add-on as it applies to IE (BHO, menu or toolbar extension, etc) any further and do sift through all the current entries and eliminate listings that are external software rather than an add-on.

    For instance, I fail to see how a third-party application that hosts the WebBrowser control qualifies as an IE add-on.

  30. Dao says:

    Error in parsing value for property ‘width’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 517)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 698)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 707)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 715)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 724)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 732)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 741)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 749)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 758)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 766)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 775)

    Error in parsing value for property ‘cursor’. Declaration dropped.styles.css (line 784)

    This crap is interisting, too:

    http://www.ieaddons.com/js/nav2.js

    Not only that there’s no need to use JS for the navigation — It’s also wrong, hence it only "works" with IE.

    Why don’t you hire s.b. who knows how to create websites? Small budget?

  31. Ron says:

    Not to mention PovRay.

  32. commenter says:

    I only really want to use IE to access the windows live mail site, since the Firefox version of the site lacks all the groovy functionality. However it’s unusable in IE because of the epilepsy-inducing ads that festoon the page. I also use the sharpreader RSS reader and would like it if the hosted IE control supported ad-blocking.

    I tried using one ad-blocking product for IE (trial version – you need to give them money to use it – weird!), but unfortunately this killed the live.com website. Anyway, why would I pay money for functionality I get free in firefox, to view a single website?

    I’ve posted to this blog in the past begging for a better .NET-based extensibility framework for IE that would allow it to approach Firefox functionality through ease of development of add-ins.

    I hereby give up. Firefox it is. 馃檪

  33. Hello,

    One of the success factors of Mozilla is the existence of a centralized extension Web site which makes it really easy to find, download and update browser add-ons. I am glad that the IE team is committed to offer something similar now.

    I am looking forward to list my own extension on the site soon, but I miss two important categories right now:

    1 Ad Blockers (either in Security or Time Savers)

    2 Search Tools (in Time Savers)

    I am not sure whether it is possible, but listing one add-on in multiple categories would also help a lot.

    I have noticed that since IE6 xpsp2 there is a Update button in the Manage Add-ons dialog. I am wondering how this Update mechanism is used from a developer’s point of view. Can you point us to some information regarding the Manage Add-ons dialog, please. Also an easy (and free) way to digitally sign extensions would be fine.

    Thanks

    Viktor

  34. I’m talking about http://www.ieaddons.com/AddOn.aspx?cid=2&scid=70&aid=4b54744c-8b63-4011-ad24-e740499a5c09

    I haven’t tried this addon, but it surely seems like something only blackhat SEOs would usually endorse. Shame on you for doing it as well.

  35. Oneandhalf says:

    this is wonderful extension on IE. I hope more addons will become available.

  36. Bert says:

    I really like the idea of this site, but my idea of add-on is a small application that adds extra functionality to IE.

    Many of the tools on this website do not seem to do this.  For example, Spybot is a great program and helps to add security to IE but I wouldn’t call it an add-on.

    Perhaps make this site just for the smaller apps that add functionality rather than full blown programs?

  37. bal4bill says:

    Took a look at "ieaddons "expecting to find MS optional items – but I can’t

    see myself buying 3rd party addons to make IE7 a fully functional.

    – I downloaded "Internet Radio" thinking that to have

    this available from the toolbar might be OK,

    All I get is a Headphone Icon that just sits there and does nothingWhen I click on it I’m told that internet radio is already running – am I

    supposed to buy some other program to be able to hear the radio programs? Is

    this a 3rd party come on?

  38. ieblog says:

    Zcorpan,

    You ask:

    "Al Billings, I would like to ask why some bugs that won’t be fixed in IE7 (but should be fixed for future releases) are closed as ‘By Design’ or ‘Won’t Fix’ and not ‘Postponed?’ For instance, I would like #54129 and #54364 (both spec violations) to be fixed in a future release (like IE8)."

    Well, as I already said, Windows does not used the "Postponed" resolution. It does not exist for us so it is not an option on the table.

    If the spec issue is a spec feature that we, *as IE7 is designed*, do not support, then it is "By Design", as I said before. There are also issues that are "Won’t Fix" because it is a bug, even in the current implementation.

    Now, that being said, there are some that have gone back and forth in resolution because people have gotten annoyed about the resolution and wanted to make an issue out of it but I am describing the ideal here. Occasionally, when triaging hundreds of bugs, I do make mistakes in the final resolution.

    What it comes down to it is that if you log a bug on something that IE7 doesn’t support, has never supported, and we didn’t write code to support, the resolution of it will be "By Design" because the way the area is functioning is the way it is supposed to function in IE7. If your favorite CSS feature has never been implemented, then logging a bug on it will generally get "By Design" as a resolution. Occasionally, it gets a "Won’t Fix" and I’ve changed resolutions before rather than have a 20 comment back and forth with people.

    Trust me when I say that CSS issues reported, regardless of resolution, will be seen by our CSS people like Markus. That being said, not every "bug" is really an actual bug in our code but an unimplemented feature.

    Al Billings [MSFT]

  39. Sean says:

    $19 for the form fill add-on?!?!?!?!

    It used to be free!

  40. Wow, these are some pretty harsh comments.

    Please consider that Microsoft is a small cash-starved company, so they might not have the resources to create a properly coded web site. I for one plan to purchase many of these "add-ups" to help them become successful.

  41. Anonymous says:

    讗讻谉 诪讝讻讬专 讗转 讗驻砖专讜讬讜转 讛讛专讞讘讛 砖谞讬转谉 诇讛讜专讬讚 注讘讜专 Firefox/ Mozilla, 讗诇讗 砖讻讗谉 讬砖 讛专讘讛 讛专讞讘讜转 讘转砖诇讜诐.

  42. Why exactly would I pay $20+ for ‘add-ons’ to Internet Explorer to give it basic functions (like ad blocking) that I can get FOR FREE with Firefox? Windows Vista is going to be fantastic, but from the looks of it I’ll still be using Firefox.

  43. PatriotB says:

    "It might be interesting to see a move between Firefox and IE to create a standardized interface for some plugins."

    There’s nothing stopping Firefox from "reading the contract from the other side" (as Raymond Chen has blogged about at http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2003/12/26/45979.aspx), in order to implement the same extensibilty mechanisms as IE.  Though I don’t expect they’d choose to do that.

  44. Fduch says:

    I want some Add-on for IE7 to be able to save webpages to my hard drive so that I can look them later.

    I see this working in other browsers like Maxthon (plugin) and Opera.

    I think it would be great if someone wrote such add-on for IE7.

    If you need money, a have some.

  45. PatriotB says:

    "Please consider that Microsoft is a small cash-starved company, so they might not have the resources to create a properly coded web site."

    Also consider that the IE team isn’t the one designing or coding this web site.  We already know that they have partnered with CNET for the actual content (the addon database)… maybe CNET is the ones creating the site as well?  Or maybe some other web design company?  If nothing else it’s some web development group in MS that probably works on their countless other web sites, and complaining on this blog isn’t going to accomplish anything.

  46. Molly C says:

    Fduch, IE has had the ability to save web pages for years, either has "Web Page, complete", which results in an html file plus a folder containing the items that appeared in the page (pics, css, etc); or "Web Page Archive, single file", which results in a single .mht file containing everything that was displayed in the page.

  47. Mercutio says:

    Wow, I never knew that there were so many people that the first thing that they do when visititing a new web page is run it through a validator, critique the source code, etc.  Pretty sad, that.

  48. Fduch says:

    Molly C, I tried this and it kept saying "Can’t save this page".

  49. foobar says:

    If there’s one thing people like to do, it’s to bash anything IE related.

    http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/ doesn’t validate either, but hey, whatever.

    It’s readily apparent that most of the people that respond to these IE blog posts are very, very marginal, very average web developers (and I use the word "developers" very liberally here).

  50. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Fduch: To save a webpage, choose File | Save As | Single File web page (MHT).

    Or you can try http://www.ieaddons.com/AddOn.aspx?cid=3&scid=73&aid=b0d0a1f9-0a4c-44ff-a2b5-42a3ade621e6

    You say that you get a "Can’t save this page"?  There are some bugs here that we’ve fixed and maybe one or two we’re still working on.  What page are you having a problem with?

    Thanks!

  51. Windy says:

    actually i think the look of the website is excellent!

  52. NotMyName says:

    http://www.ieaddons.com/Search.aspx

    Could you add "Open source" as a license please.

  53. __hAl__ says:

    @Viktor Krammer

    [quote]As the site seems to be made by CNET the categories seem copied from de CNET downloads site downloads.com[/quote]That site also only has a categorie pop-up blockers (listed under security) and also not a categorie Ad blockers.

  54. Johnny B.Good says:

    Q: How many Microsoft testers does it take to change a light bulb?

    A: We just noticed the room was dark; we don’t actually fix the problems.

  55. @David Russell

    >Why exactly would I pay $20+ for ‘add-ons’ to Internet Explorer to give it basic functions (like ad blocking) that I can get FOR FREE with Firefox?

    There are many free add-ons for IE (like mine), but not all are listed in the ieaddons page. As mentioned earlier, the site lacks a category for ad blockers. No wonder, you did not find any 馃槈

    @hAl

    >[quote]As the site seems to be made by CNET the categories seem copied from de CNET downloads site downloads.com[/quote]

    Apparently, they forgot to copy one category (where also my plug-in is listed):

    Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    (http://www.download.com/Search-Tools/3150-2379_4-0.html?tag=dir)

    @ieaddons.com team

    Currently, I do not fully understand how the CNET categories are mapped to the ieaddons.com categories.

    On CNET IE add-ons are spread accross various categories. Some examples:

    1 Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    2 Security > Pop-Up Blockers

    3 Browsers > Plug-ins

    4 Browsers > Internet Explorer Add-ons

    5 Developer Tools > ActiveX > Browser  Enhancements

    etc.

    When I log in to my CNET account from the ieaddons.upload.com page, I only see the categories from CNET but no additional info regarding the new ieaddons page. That is quite confusing.

    Thanks

  56. Bryan says:

    What kind of add-on site is that?  It looked just like random programs that had an option for IE integration.  Not what I call add-ons.

  57. Erik says:

    I cannot find anything on this problem so here goes:

    With IE7 I cannot download any files, pdf’s, .doc’s, .exe.  Everytime I try to download something it responds with : Internet Exploere is not able to find this site.

    HELP!

  58. gerrard says:

    meaningful categorization would be helpful, the first page of "developer tools" has no actual developer tools.

  59. @David Russell

    >Why exactly would I pay $20+ for ‘add-ons’ to Internet Explorer to give it basic functions (like ad blocking) that I can get FOR FREE with Firefox?

    There are many free add-ons for IE (like mine), but not all are listed in the ieaddons page. As mentioned earlier, the site lacks a category for ad blockers. No wonder, you did not find any 馃槈

    @hAl

    >[quote]As the site seems to be made by CNET the categories seem copied from de CNET downloads site downloads.com[/quote]

    Apparently, they forgot to copy one category (where also my plug-in is listed):

    Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    (http://www.download.com/Search-Tools/3150-2379_4-0.html?tag=dir)

    @ieaddons team

    Currently, I do not fully understand how the CNET categories are mapped to the ieaddons.com categories.

    On CNET IE add-ons are spread accross various categories. Some examples:

    1 Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    2 Security > Pop-Up Blockers

    3 Browsers > Plug-ins

    4 Browsers > Internet Explorer Add-ons

    5 Developer Tools > ActiveX > Browser  Enhancements

    etc.

    When I log in to my CNET account from the ieaddons.upload.com page, I only see the categories from CNET but no additional info regarding the new ieaddons page. That is quite confusing.

    Thanks

  60. @David Russell

    >Why exactly would I pay $20+ for ‘add-ons’ to Internet Explorer to give it basic functions (like ad blocking) that I can get FOR FREE with Firefox?

    There are many free add-ons for IE (like mine), but not all are listed in the ieaddons page. As mentioned earlier, the site lacks a category for ad blockers. No wonder, you did not find any 馃槈

  61. @hAl

    >[quote]As the site seems to be made by CNET the categories seem copied from de CNET downloads site downloads.com[/quote]

    Apparently, they forgot to copy one category (where also my plug-in is listed):

    Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    (http://www.download.com/Search-Tools/3150-2379_4-0.html?tag=dir)

    @ieaddons.com team

    Currently, I do not fully understand how the CNET categories are mapped to the ieaddons.com categories.

    On CNET IE add-ons are spread accross various categories. Some examples:

    1 Utilities & Drivers > Tools & Utilities > Search Tools

    2 Security > Pop-Up Blockers

    3 Browsers > Plug-ins

    4 Browsers > Internet Explorer Add-ons

    5 Developer Tools > ActiveX > Browser  Enhancements

    etc.

    When I log in to my CNET account from the ieaddons.upload.com page, I only see the categories from CNET but no additional info regarding the new ieaddons page. That is quite confusing.

    Thanks

  62. Jack says:

    Tried out the new site.

    Issue(s):

    1.) I laughed real hard when I saw the correctly named "Bookmark Managers" section

    2.) Many do not work in IE7 yet

    3.) Many cost lots of $$, I did not see the Open Source filter option

    4.) Could not find the "equals" to:

     a.) AdBlock

     b.) Colorzilla

     c.) Web Dev Toolbar

     d.) WeatherFox

     e.) BugMeNot

     f.) GMail Notifier

     g.) Firefox View (although I have the Firefox one, so thats cool)

     h.) Platypus

     i.) Greasemonkey!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Obviously a bit of a specific set, but as a developer, many of these are required.

    Otherwise, I can’t wait.  It will be interesting to surf in IE again, it has been like wow, over 4 years now! yikes!  Way to come back!

  63. aapje says:

    I needed a bit of time to adjust to the changes from Beta 2, but now I just LOVE it. The Quick Tabs now also work very fast. Keep working to the final build, faster and faster 馃檪

  64. Nidonocu says:

    @EricLaw

    Good to see you guys are listening! Hope you see this too.

    What I’d like to see in terms of .net support anyway is being able to interact with IE as though it was a web-browser control in my own application. Reading and writing in the DOM should be as simple as doing so with the XML Dom object in .net 2.0. That would allow all hell to break loose in terms of power.

    For editing the ‘chrome’ as I believe its known. Supporting ToolStrip objects would be great but more so, letting buttons go in the -right- places.

    If I make an add-on to the Favorites Center, can’t I put the button in there or near the * and + buttons? If I extend tabs can I put the button in tabs or if I extend the address bar.. etc. Personally, I have the Links and Google bar viewed right now and 4 lines of toolbar is not nice on the screen retail when all I use Google for is spell checking and autofill.

    Securitywise, maybe add-ons could request permissions for what functions they want to use. Eg, reading the DOM to display a phishing alert (eBay Toolbar style) would not be as dangerous as writing (GreaseMonkey). Also, file access could be limited to an Isolated Storage area by default and add-ons of course should run in the ultra low-rights mode. So similar again to ClickOnce application permissions, a little dialog like this for say IE version of FF’s Adblock:

    The add-on you want to install wants to be able to perform the following actions:

    Add an icon to your status bar.

    Modify how webpages are displayed.

    Save preferences to a location on your hard drive.

  65. PatriotB says:

    (Ok, I could have sworn that I posted a message yesterday in response to the following… but either it got lost in the blog system or somewhere on the internet…)

    Viktor said: "I have noticed that since IE6 xpsp2 there is a Update button in the Manage Add-ons dialog. I am wondering how this Update mechanism is used from a developer’s point of view."

    I believe that this button uses the same mechanism as going to C:WindowsDownloaded Program Files, right-clicking on a control and selecting Update.  This has been around since IE4 I believe.  It is based on "Internet Component Download" technology, documented at http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/delivery/download/download_node_entry.asp?frame=true.

    However, I’m not sure if this technology is on the way out with IE7/Vista; related features like Channels have been removed so I wouldn’t be surprised to see this go too.

  66. Fduch says:

    a pair of sample pages that IE7 can’t save

    http://doci.nnm.ru/zuga/26.04.2006/fotografii_zemli_iz_kosmosa

    http://www.deforum.ru/forum/printview.php?t=46907&sid=67808c4ca7f9553a163fd617e6b86608

    P.S. why does saving the page blocks everyting?

    It shouldn’t block even the tab with the page that is being saved. But now it blocks entire browser with all tabs. And if web page saving hungs (the progress bar is not moving for hours and the cancel button doesn’t work) the entire browser with all tabs is dead. And that tab won’t open when IE7 is started ater such incident. IE just forgets them.

    P.P.S. How can we report IE7 hanging if it’s not reprodusable?

  67. Josyp says:

    How can we report IE7 hanging if it’s not reprodusable

  68. Daniel Prado says:

    Hi,

    I have one question: This new IE 7 version, will be free or Does we need to pay to download it?

    And what new features has IE respect Firefox?

    Cheers

    <a href="http://www.daniel.prado.name/">Daniel Prado Rodríguez’s Personal Page</a>

  69. @PatriotB

    Thanks for the link.

    I also had difficulties posting my previous reply. Dividing my reply into two parts helped at last.

  70. Plovert says:

    I didn’t see anywhere else to list requests, so I’ll post them here.

    1. Add-ons that are incorporated into the browser. A downloader that started up when I wanted to download something and then closed itself would be great. Add-ons that have to run as separate processes are annoying, and if they’re incorporated into ie7, perhaps when I upgrade ie, ie can look for upgrades for tha addons (like ff).

    2. Make the browser more customizable and streamlined. If There is only one tab, don’t show the tabs until a new one is shown. This eliminates an entire row from the top menu for 70% of my browsing time (as i’m only looking at one thing at a time).

    3. Have options that let you SPECIFICALLY regulate what options come up when you right click the screen. I use right click to go back and forward, so if I have a huge window popping up when I right click, this can be annoying.

    4. let me get rid of the search window imbedded in the top right corner of the window w/ google toolbar or msn toolbar. This would allow me to eliminate yet another row of options from the top menu.

    Things I do like:

    the f11 command. It lags the computer a little bit, but the fact that it eliminates all the top menus altogher is great. Let it show the toolbars I install, and it’d be perfect (google toolbar doesn’t show up in f11 mode).

    2. the favorites center is AWESOME. I love that the window doesn’t push over the page I’m looking at. If it had a hot key, it’d be perfect.

    3. allow ‘open tab in background’ as an option on right click.

    4. more free add-ons

    5. i love microsoft, and the software you guys put out is awesome. Thank you for all the sweat and blood you put into your programs. The love put into it shows when a program comes out looking as clean and neat as ie7 does.

    tia

  71. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @Plovert: Hit ALT+A to open the Favorites Center.

  72. notanidiot says:

    Hmm, its magic that microsoft sees the success of addons.mozilla.org and they decide to create something very simular. Also magic that they started developing IE again when they saw Firefox’s success. There not developing the browser for the people, there developing the browser for money, and success of the company.  The reason why there are now copyying everything mozilla corp does is because they feel if people start using multi-platform products, like firefox people will switch to non-microsoft platforms.  I believe this is a very weak statigy, and think microsoft should be more inovative. Maybe i would change my mind is M$ made a browser for another os besides windows.

  73. Tom says:

    "there developing the browser for money, and success of the company"

    I entirely agree, but this is a commercial business we’re talking about here – it exists purely to make money.

    Do you expect a company to exist purely to ‘be for the people’?

    Microsoft is a company – not an open source organisation.

  74. Kim Siever says:

    So, how do I navigate the site? When I go to click on what I assume to be the menu (tabs), there is no indication they are links (no change in cursor, no change in image), so those can’;t be the menu.

    Any insight?

  75. Jamie says:

    You must be using Firefox. The hand indicators don’t show up in firefox. It must be a browser thing.

  76. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @AD: No, this isn’t a good way to test IE7.  We’ve discussed the "franken-browser" problem on the blog before.  Hacks like that one result in parts of IE7 and parts of IE6 running together in incompatible ways.  

  77. Zaim says:

    Microsoft should buy Maxthon Browser. It’s IE internally and it has lots of free add-ons Period.

  78. RJ Loggans says:

    Have had nothing but problems since downloading IE 7 beta. Now how the heck do I get rid of it and back to IE 6? Newby so don’t get to tekky on me. Thanx

  79. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    @RJ: You can remove IE7 the same way you remove any other application.  START | SETTINGS | CONTROL PANEL | ADD / REMOVE PROGRAMS.  Find Internet Explorer 7 Beta 2 in the list and click Remove.

    It would be very helpful to explain what problems you’re encountering, so that we can help you or fix them on our side.

  80. Not A Dancing Shrimp says:

    At the people who consider the "markup validility" of a site and W3C’s validator gospel as to whether a site is good or bad, _grow up_. You can still read it. It is not going to kill anyone if you use a table.

    That out of the way, I agree with others here. No amount of marketing can really hide that IE’s add-on ecosystem is floundering at best, and honestly has absolutely nothing on Firefox’s extensiblity. Sure, there’s some pretty good addons (Fiddler). But making addons with just JS and so on is that much better, because not everyone wants to get dirty with C++ or has the ability to. I understand that creating a safe, simple system like Firefox’s isn’t something you can just prop up with a couple of toothpicks, especially considering the way IE is, and it surely would be a BIG undertaking. But, hey, put it this way – once it’s up, you’ll have hordes of people making features for you at no cost to yourselves. Developers get to develop, users of IE get their features and you can focus on making headway with Javascript engine overhaul in later releases or whatever secret plans you guys have going. Everybody wins.

    Make it nice and easy for developers to get stuff out on IE, and users of IE will soon benefit from the huge extension ecosystem it creates. People would reojice as they find that guy who made the obscure "Sudoku" extension for Firefox now also has an IE version.

    On the other hand, IE could cling to the current system with just a bunch of arcane MSDN articles to help people for another two years. (Ugh).

    These are just my opinons anyway. You know better than me what IE needs and doesn’t need. Don’t get me wrong, IE 7 is an absolutely GREAT leap in the right direction (I was a Firefox user before now), and I can only hope the guys at Microsoft who make these kind of decisions are able to recognise that if each release of IE showed progress like we’ve seen between 6 -> 7, then I’m confident those spreadfirefox.com guys are going to have their party rained on. Ballmer, THROW NO MORE!

  81. Anon says:

    Why doesn’t Microsoft provide add-on sites for their extensible products under the web site that houses that same product instead of creating a new site from scrach each time? Your add-ons story is a mess: Some products eg. all Office products, Visual Studio, etc, do not even have a site listing all free add-ins but instead you have to either search through Google the web or look at Microsoft partner solutions which to me is like advertising and not helping users. In additions, those products that do have free add-ins sites like Windows Media Player and now Internet Explorer, do not offer these site under the main product site but instead they force you to search on the Web to find it. Why don’t you offer a single universal add-ins site for all Microsoft products that are extensible or at least web pages that list free add-ins under the main pages for every Microsoft product that can be extended? If open source competitors like Eclipse, Firefox, etc, can get it, why not Microsoft? What is so difficult about it? It is so hard for you to figure this out?

  82. Mike says:

    The new IE is good enough for me to consider using it again. I’d like to be able to import bookmarks (and possibly other features) from Firefox, however.

  83. krenzman says:

    EricLaw states: "I’m afraid that tabs are not exposed to extensibility in the IE7 release."  I simply can’t believe this.  Tabbed browsing was supposed to be one of the big new things with IE7, and it’s not exposed???

    I can’t believe it… I still don’t believe it.  You’ve got to be kidding.. tell me you’re kidding…  …really.

  84. PatriotB says:

    krenzman: Exposing public APIs is definitely an undertaking.  Not too huge (compared to the feature itself), but still something that takes effort.

    There’s only so much that MS can put into IE7 and still have a timely release.  (Yes, I know that timely is a joke given the "pause" since IE6, but bear with me.)  As with any software project, there are things that get cut in order to ship.  This is just one of them.

    I’d rather see them release IE7 now, and wait till the next version for tab programmability, and do it right.  Remember, when you expose an API, it’s exposed for life.  Better they take a bit more time to get the programmability mechanism right.

  85. Anand says:

    Hello, well it might sound dumb, but can someone tell me how to create these add ons. I mean how to add my applications to IE7. Is there any api available or any classes available in VS.net (i code in C#)

    thanks

  86. Anand says:

    Hello,

    I just went through the previous posts and go this links

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/browser/ext/extensions.asp

    If there is any other link do lemme know

    btw IE7 is good but does it have any option to have IE6 look and feel??

    thanks

  87. EricLaw [MSFT] says:

    I blogged about the best ways to extend IE, including using .NET.  See the post here: http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/09/06/461675.aspx

  88. Anand says:

    Thank you very much eric.

Skip to main content