Clear my Tracks: yes please!!!!


First let me introduce myself. My name is Uche Enuha and I am a recent college graduate hire to the Internet Explorer team. I am a Program Manager working on the User Experience team.
Now to the main point. There is a new feature in IE7 called ‘Delete Browsing History’ that gives users an easy way to control the data stored by the browser.I am going to answer the three main questions that I think are going through your heads right now, I’ll let you meditate on the information and allow the excitement to naturally evolve.

Why would I use this feature?
I am glad you asked this question. Let’s look at an example of how this feature can be used. So you’re trying to buy a gift for your loved one and you know how important it is to keep this mission secret. You’re aware of every site you visit but your machine is aware of even more; the stuff you type, the information you read, even the cookies requested by the site where you eventually buy the gift. You realize how important it is that your loved one never gets hold of any of this information. So you do what we all would, you try and cover your tracks. Now back in IE6, you would have to spend a lot of time looking through various places on your computer to get rid of all the relevant information and possibly still miss some critical information. Now with the ‘Delete Browsing History’ feature, we are giving every person the ability to clear all their browsing information from one location with a click of a button and, the peace of mind that the job was done right.

What does this feature really do?
It deletes the following items which are split into five categories, listed below:

  • Temporary Internet Files: Downloaded files cached on the client for quick access
    • Temporary Internet Files cached for quick access
    • Cached files containing Offline favorites
    • Information stored by other applications in the Temporary Internet Files folder (e.g. attachment files stored by Outlook)
  • Cookies: Information persisted by the client on behalf of the server
    • Cookies
    • XML Userdata cache
  • History: website addresses (URLs) stored to enable History/most recently used website addresses
    • Typed website addresses used for Addressbar Autocomplete
    • The list of most recently used website addresses in the Run… dialog
    • URL History entries (excluding ones marked as Offline Favorites)
    • Stored value for Encoding (Code Page)
  • Form Data: User-entered personal data stored by the client
    • AutoComplete form data
  • Passwords: User-entered personal data stored by the client
    • AutoComplete password data

(Please note, if you’re part of a domain in a corporate environment, an administrator has the ability to disable certain aspects of this feature.)

The User Interface for this feature provides information about what exactly these types of information are and gives the user the ability to individually delete each type of information or delete all information at once. Here’s what the main dialog looks like:

Delete Browsing History dialog

As an added bonus, if cleaning up is taking a while, a cancellable progress dialog is shown. You can ignore the dialog and go back to the browser (or even close it) – the process will continue in the background until it’s done. No more sitting around waiting for your 200MB cache to be emptied!

Where can we find this great feature?
Just go to the Tools menu and you’ll see ‘Delete Browsing History…’. Or whilst you’re in the internet options dialog, you can find this feature under the General tab in the Browsing history section cleverly disguised as the ‘Delete…’ button.

So there you have it. ‘Delete Browsing History…’ will be coming to a computer near you very shortly. Use it and enjoy it. Think of it as your friend that has your back and covers your tracks.

-Uche

Comments (236)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Why don’t you make it a checklist? If I want to delete everything but the cookies, it would still be many clicks to do.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Exactly, I almost never want to clear all of those items at once, sometimes just the history and cache, not cookies and etc. There should be options, a checklist, etc.

  3. geoff.appleby says:

    Can it be done a per-site basis? I don’t want my entire cache cleared, just those that pertain to the porn^H^H^H^Hgift site I was visiting.

    Being able to remove all evidence of visiting http://www.ilovelinux.com would be very handy.

    :)

  4. Anonymous says:

    This is great! :) Thanks a lot. This page always helps me with something (one of the reasons I still use IE…)

    <a href="http://r2000.blogspot.com">R2K</a&gt;

  5. Anonymous says:

    Better yet, allow me to set a menu item that will prevent the capture of this information in the first place. The behaviour would be:

    1) I need to *ahem*, buy a gift for my loved one :)

    2) I click on the menu "Prevent IE from Collecting History"

    3) I, um, finish buying the gift.

    4) I uncheck the box.

    I *hate* clearing my history, because lots of history is useful. What’s that new supplier’s site I went to last week and forgot to bookmark, etc. I hate losing all that info, just to cover up the fact that I, ahem, bought a gift for a loved one.

    Selective history. That’s what we need. Or a way to selectively delete browsing history after the fact. I mean, we’re only over 10 years into this whole web browser thing, and we have basically the same feature since v1.

  6. Anonymous says:

    I agree with geoff. It would be great to be able to permanently exclude some cookies from the erasure list (my.yahoo, amazon, blogger, etc.), some cookes do serve a valuable purpose, after all. It would also be kewl to be able to block cookies on a site-by-site basis (adsomething, tracksomething, etc.) or even be able to import a list (like an email filter list) of blocked cookies.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Well it’s about time you finally posted something new in this blog, so thanks for that. I’m glad this sort of "new" functionality is being made available for IE7, but there’s just a couple of things I’m concerned about.

    First of all it’s not new, don’t make it sound like this is some revolutionary new feature you’ve invented and IE7 will be the first browser to incorporate it. I’ve been using this sort of functionality in other browsers for a long time.

    Also why on earth did you call it "Clear Browsing History"? If there’s one way to confuse users with this feature then you’re on the right track. Seriously, people are going to think they’re only deleting their… history, also known as the last pages they visited.

    Here’s a suggestion, how about calling it "Clear Private Data", or "Clear Saved Data", or "Clear Stored Data", or even "Clear My Tracks"?

  8. Anonymous says:

    <<It would also be kewl to be able to block cookies on a site-by-site basis (adsomething, tracksomething, etc.) or even be able to import a list (like an email filter list) of blocked cookies.>>

    IE6 and above already offer this feature, although I agree that it’s a bit tricky to use.

    This feature is documented here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/workshop/security/privacy/customimportxml/customimportxml.asp

    This feature allows you to block cookies, downgrade permanent cookies to session cookies, et. cetera.

    -Eric

  9. PatriotB says:

    I’m glad to hear that the problem with the UI becoming unresponsive has been fixed. How about the issue of "gunk" left over in side of the Temporary Internet Files folder? Even after I use "Delete Files", my TIF folder still is over 100 MB, and contains lots of "orphaned" files that will never be deleted. I have to go to a command prompt and manually go through all the folders and delete the cruft. Has this been taken care of?

  10. Anonymous says:

    Ron has a point, though I don’t think Clear Browsing History is that unclear. Also, will this REALLY clear the history? Today, in IE, when you clear history, there are still telltale tracks left in various index files and such. Will this REALLY clear the data from the machine, or will it just clear some of it?

  11. search-engines-web says:

    This is a good idea – the only two things that have been added that can’t be done now is

    Forms Data

    Passwords

    But under Internet Options in the current IE6 you can- however – delete the first three – and usually when the Cookies are deleted the passwords are too.

    One question – when the Temporary Internet Files are Deleted – are they REALLY Deleted Permanently and can never be recovered?

  12. Anonymous says:

    <<How about the issue of "gunk" left over in side of the Temporary Internet Files folder? >>

    PatriotB: Yup, this should be removed as well. (This is what was meant by "Information stored by other applications in the Temporary Internet Files folder (e.g. attachment files stored by Outlook)")

  13. Anonymous says:

    <<Also, will this REALLY clear the history? Today, in IE, when you clear history, there are still telltale tracks left in various index files and such.>>

    If you can find this data in any index files, we want to hear about it. We worked to specifically address that issue.

    Do note that these are generally file-deletions and not cryptographically secure drive wipes. If your loved one happens to work for the NSA, you’ll want to wipe the freespace on your drive using

    cipher /w:C:

    after running the Delete Browsing History feature.

  14. Anonymous says:

    Doesn’t firefox offer this already…? Someone had to mention that other browser, right ;)

  15. Anonymous says:

    Love this question you have to ask yourself in the blog.

    "Why would I use this feature?"

    We already do in other browsers. More delay, and more fluff in getting your product out.

  16. PatriotB says:

    "This is a good idea – the only two things that have been added that can’t be done now is

    Forms Data

    Passwords"

    You can delete these in IE6 by going Tools > Options > Content > AutoComplete. It is nice that IE7 will bring all these things together.

    EricLaw: To experiment, I just did a clear of my cache (I’m using IE6) to see what’s left behind. After deleting, my Content.IE5 folder is 52.3 MB, 1633 files. Most don’t appear to fall into the "Outlook attachment"-type category. Here’s a rundown:

    - Lots of 0-byte files that are named [1], [2], [3], etc.

    - A bunch of wbkXXX.tmp files

    - Lots of variously-named files that contain the contents of res://shdoclc.dll/http_404.htm

    - Files that came from ordinary web surfing

  17. Anonymous says:

    <blockquote>1) I need to *ahem*, buy a gift for my loved one :)

    2) I click on the menu "Prevent IE from Collecting History"

    3) I, um, finish buying the gift.

    4) I uncheck the box. </blockquote>

    I have to agree with Nick’s post.

    Safari implimented this feature and called it "Private Browsing" mode. It’s really quite simple to use, despite that fact that it’s a little bit unlear as to which windows/tabs will be in private browse mode. I still think that it’s important to have the Browse History window pane, but it would be great if you could offer switch on/off model as well.

  18. Anonymous says:

    Looking forward to this actually doing what it should have done all along by deleting the index.dat files. Besides the privacy concerns there are drive space issues as well: http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=322916

  19. Anonymous says:

    Thank you. I am really looking forward to this. IE6 did a terrible job at this and left many traces of private data. That was one of my main reasons for giving up on IE and adopting Firefox. Because of this "improvement", I’ll give IE7 another chance. Hopefully it’ll do a much better job than before at clearing _all_ of the private data. I got tired of doing it manually multiple times every day.

  20. geoff.appleby says:

    Another possible variation that would be cool, (if we are only left with blanket options to remove all or none) is give us an option to say ‘don’t delete anything that pertains to sites in my trusted sites list’.

  21. Anonymous says:

    Great feature!

    However, I see a problem with the mapping of the "Delete All" button. It’s located where the OK button normally is. Users might not read the button caption and click it based just on spatial memory ("ah, OK").

    This could be a problem if users just want to delete specific items, such as Cookies, and then inadvertently click the "Delete All" button instead of the Close button because they think it’s the "OK" button.

    –> Having two buttons in the lower right corner of a dialog box implies "OK" and "Cancel".

    This dialog box should not violate this standard. In this case, it’s especially important because users might delete items by mistake that they still want to keep.

  22. Anonymous says:

    Now to actually be one step ahead of Firefox, you really do need the ‘Clear my tracks since I started IE’ option, or since IE is so core to the OS and that might be like guessing when it will ship, perhaps since a time.

    That way you can remove just the Gift purchase tracks, not everything else which you probably really want to keep.

  23. Anonymous says:

    I agree with Roland, if I saw a close button next to another button I would instinctively click the button that doesn’t say Close, because when you make a change to something and you want to keep it you don’t hit close/cancel. Even though the changes are immediate, having a button to the left of Close would imply the other button means OK.

    Then again maybe it would be better if we could test this, like now… soon, maybe?

  24. Anonymous says:

    So, to add to this, I saw on this blog:

    http://www.jcxp.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=4499

    Showing some screenshots from IE7, which looked authentic, but this shot scared me:

    http://www.jcxp.net/forums/index.php?s=7c8d53bbf13731b3b37330e68c481f69&act=Attach&type=post&id=2747

    In the fine print, on the RSS Feed dialog, it states that my computer (Windows), will be checking (wGet?) my feeds for me to check for updates!?!?!? even when IE isn’t running?

    See here:

    http://img68.imageshack.us/img68/9080/scaryie72md.png

    So, do these tracks get erased? Can this feature be turned off? Security of downloading (and pressumably processing) these feeds?

    No offence, but I do not want my OS, downloading and processing feeds, when I don’t ask it to. Not now, not ever.

    Paranoid? I think not, take a closer look.

    XML feeds, are just XML… nothing is executed…

    Except, you can supply a CSS stylesheet to your XML feed too, to style it, (e.g. to show instead of the ugly XML markup)

    Now, IE(+7?) is the only browser, that allows script to execute inside CSS styles (cough, "expression")

    Now, the JavaScript (er, make that JScript) if it gets executed, will it run as trusted local? some nice "trusted" ActiveX in there, and tada! full system access?!

    Anyone else here see this as a disaster waiting to happen?

    Please tell me I can turn this off!

    It certainly doesn’t "look" like "trusted computing"

  25. Anonymous says:

    I wish I could right click on url’s in the address bar and have the option to delete them. Some are one time things or things I don’t want kept in there for various reasons. It’s a pain to have to delete them all and resave them all. I know that I could just save ‘em to my favorites, but what’s the sense of favoriting them when I can just grab ‘em from the address bar. It’s far more convenient for my 5-10 most visited sites.

  26. Anonymous says:

    "Better yet, allow me to set a menu item that will prevent the capture of this information in the first place. The behaviour would be:

    1) I need to *ahem*, buy a gift for my loved one :)

    2) I click on the menu "Prevent IE from Collecting History"

    3) I, um, finish buying the gift.

    4) I uncheck the box."

    Apple’s Safari can do that.

    ;-)

  27. Anonymous says:

    Will this clear the index.dat file (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index.dat) or it’s equivalent?

  28. Anonymous says:

    Here’s what you have accomplished so far Microsoft. I mean let’s face it your no longer the pioneers in this field anymore and the "unveiling" of these already "key features" have been already said and done. And today’s post is just another example of yesterdays capabilities in other products.

    1. Increased fear of foreigners. Farmer john is going to be browsing for religion and happen upon a muslim site in arabic and his url is going to light up "red" and he is just going to fear and hate them more. I mean it’s bad enough in punycode (i.e. xn-sdfklj) but you had to push him one step further.

    2. The realization that your innovations are just plain and simple "code cut and paste" I mean are we going to have to wait another few weeks for the next bit of great news of another "great feature" that is already standard on most browsers?

    3. I guess time will tell, but your already down in the count. How about we see the browser already.

  29. Anonymous says:

    Forgive my ignorance, but I still can’t understand how deleting even 200mb of cached items can take that long, let alone 100mb.

    Sometimes it’s just painful to have IE sit there while you’re deleting the cache via the dialogue. I can just as easily have a shortcut to the folder, hit CTRL+A, DEL and hit enter and have all of the files deleted almost instantly.

    Why does it take that long to delete?

    BTW, I’m very happy that this feature is available in the next version. I clear my cache quite frequently while developing to this is going to help a lot.

    Keep up the great work! I can’t wait to see this all done and released!

  30. Anonymous says:

    how about adding "Delete Browsing History" on the IE icon when right clicking it and automatically delete all information at once.

  31. Anonymous says:

    Re: concerned consumer

    1. Well, we must really be improving if all you have to complain about is that the punycode IDN security feature is somehow going to turn one race against another. The red address bar should only appear at phishing sites.

    2. Try shipping "code cut and paste" to millions of people and see how well it works. The features not only have to be written, but our test team has to verify they work properly and do not effect app compat.

    3. I’m not sure what the first sentence is trying to get across. There are CTPs released and reviews on CNet and other sites.

    Thanks for your comments though.

  32. Anonymous says:

    As it has already been pointed out this is a new feature for IE, but hardly new and not really all that of an impressive implementation of said feature. I’m glad IE will finally get a better utility to delete browsing history and browser stored information, but in its current form this feature hardly requires a blog entry and is more akin to a line item in a features list.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m glad MS is finally taking steps to mature their browser in the face of competition, but shouldn’t this have been one of the first features talked about and added to IE 7 months and months ago? And to top it off this just seems like an after thought or a keeping up with the joneses way of adding this feature to IE with hardly any added benefit over what is currently included with modern browsers. I would love to see MS not only add what is already available in Firefox and Safari (not even really up to par with those two apps yet), but swing for the fences.

    Keep up the hard work and please keep us informed on IE’s progress.

  33. Anonymous says:

    Well, this would have been really nice 4 years ago when I was into the whole online porn thing. Would have saved countless hours manually deleting everything.

    The good thing is that Microsoft will save untold numbers of relationships through the mechenism of lies and the unknown known.

    And everyone told me Microsoft was evil… well, saving marriages makes them pretty damn holy if you ask me.

    *Secretly wishes he knew where this feature was in Firefox. Not that he looked or cared.

    —————————————

    I think the reason why it takes so long is that it has to make sure what it is deleting is actually temporary for IE and not some random crap. In my experience (which isn’t saying much), there have been some folders and Internet files owned by other software programs, that either by poor programming or R&D, they thought that using the Temporary Internet Folder was a good idea. Most modern software programs (that cost money), don’t do that and use the Windows Home folder equivalent thing, whatever.

    Which, it would be nice to figure out to move that out of the primary Disk Partition on to its own drive. Although, I’m sure a little bit of research would solve that problem… again, if I cared. Lossing all my stuff doesn’t really bother me.

  34. Anonymous says:

    @geoff: Just my thought ;-)

  35. Anonymous says:

    <<Will other information deleted using the "Delete browsing history" also be zero’d, such as cached images, cookies, etc? >>

    If you click "Delete browsing history" and are able to find any trace of your traffic visible via normal means, we consider that a bug and want to hear about it. As noted before, we do not perform a disk wipe and if you want to prevent undeletions, you can use Cipher /w:C:

    <<In the fine print, on the RSS Feed dialog, it states that my computer (Windows), will be checking (wGet?) my feeds for me to check for updates!?!?!? even when IE isn’t running? >>

    You raise some good points, but I assure you that we’ve considered all of these factors and there’s no cause for alarm.

    Subscribing to a feed means just that– you ~want~ content to be sent to your computer. If you don’t want content to be sent to your computer, then don’t subscribe to the feed.

    Also, please note: CSS styles are not processed during the subscription process, only when you view a document. The Local Computer zone in Windows does not have permission to run ActiveX controls, so there’s no worry there.

  36. Anonymous says:

    Now all we need is an "Auction tracker", and "a saved website"-feature, like in Apple’s Internet Explorer

  37. Anonymous says:

    SantosJ, try Pornzilla – it probably has this feature (I wouldn’t know, as I don’t bother keeping my porn-hunting secret :-) – I /am/ human, after all).

    As a web developer, one thing I have always wanted in browsers is a simple "clear cache" button, which allows me to reload a website including any changed CSS or JavaScript files. In Firefox, I get that by adding the "WebDev" toolbar, then it’s a three-click "Miscellaneous -> Clear Cache -> OK" routine before I reload the page.

    In IE, it’s a massive six-click "Tools -> Internet Options -> Delete Files… -> Delete All Offline Content -> Ok -> Ok" before the reload.

    If this could be improved, I’m sure that would please a load of developers.

    Even just remembering the state of the "Delete Offline Content" would shave two clicks off it.

  38. Anonymous says:

    Feature request: "Delete history for **this session only**" ?

  39. Mike_J says:

    It is very useful to create a filter, such as always keep yahoo, amazon cookies.

    On the status bar, has an indicator, whether cookie or history is recorded, and click it the delete dialog will popup. Right click it, categoried delete menu will popup.

  40. Anonymous says:

    "I have always wanted in browsers is a simple "clear cache" button, which allows me to reload a website including any changed CSS or JavaScript files."

    ———————————

    I might be wrong but doesn’t Ctrl + F5 do this?

    James

  41. Anonymous says:

    Am I the only one who has noticed a typo in the screenshot?

    *cough*cough* History

  42. Anonymous says:

    Steven, I don’t see any typo…

  43. Anonymous says:

    First up, I think this could be a useful feature, particularly for situations where you’re selling a PC and want to take a "scorched earth" approach to covering your tracks. Personally I tend to be more selective (and I use separate profiles for privacy), but I’m not a typical user, so that’s not an issue.

    As some advice though, I do echo Roland’s concern about the "Delete All" being in the same place as the "OK" button. When I was at my last job, the boss called me over to ask how he could empty out his cache to free up some space on his hard drive. So, I showed him how to do that, and also explained the other options while I was there. When it came to the "Clear Passwords" option, I started to say "If you click that button it will delete all your saved passwords, so you probably don’t want to do that" but I only got as far as "If you click that button" before he clicked it. He was then rather annoyed with me, since he couldn’t remember the passwords to all the websites he used, so I’ve been careful to phrase things differently ever since ("Don’t click on that button for now, because…").

    If people do choose to delete passwords (directly or indirectly), I think it would help to change the wording on the confirmation dialog. So, rather than just repeating the original question ("Delete form passwords?"), say something like "Are you sure that you can remember all the passwords you’ll need?"

    And Steve, I don’t see any typos in the screenshot – either one of us is going blind, or they’ve corrected it already…

  44. Anonymous says:

    "visted"?

    Also, much of the "descriptive" text is pretty terse. It looks like it was written by a developer, rather than by somebody keen on making a useful and intuitive user interface. To all dialog window writers: articles are your friend.

  45. Anonymous says:

    Joal > Yes Firefox does this since 1.5. And the UI for this feature is better in FF IMHO.

  46. Anonymous says:

    @ IE developers

    I am currently developing a small CLI tool for deleting user traces. I seek advice on how to programmatically delete IE’s AutoForm data. Since this data is stored under HKCU/Protected Storage System Provider it is difficult for me to get access to it. (ok, that’s probably intentional).

    Is there any official way for ISVs to access the Windows Protected Storage System or does/will IE expose some APIs to clean that data?

    Another recent question which I would like to ask the IE developers is how to create an IE instance in a separate process and automate it afterwards. CoCreateInstance is a very nice thing but it reuses existing IE processes for launching new instances. Is there any way to force CoCreateInstance spawning a new process each time it is called?

    I am asking these questions here because I have not found adequate answers on the Web.

    Thanks

    Viktor

  47. Anonymous says:

    This will make things a lot easier. My only question regarding to the background deletion thread is if a new IE window is open and the deletion process has not been completed whether or not the problem is resolved? I’ve had the cache take up to 20 min to delete in the past. I’m assuming that if I continue to surf within that 20 min, that the cache may still be in effect? Will there be a pop up stating that the deletion has been completed, much like Windows Update?

    Also, I don’t know if it’s possible due to the core integration, but will we ever see a "Repair Internet Explorer", as seen in Accessories – System Tools of older Windows, for XP and Vista? Or does it already exist in a different location?

  48. Anonymous says:

    i think there are two features that need to be here. One is the uber version of "Delete Temporary Files", which has those 47 buttons.

    The other feature i want is "Privacy Mode" that prevents ie from storing anything until i turn it off.

    i agree with above comments. Clearing my history, and passwords is a pretty destructive operation, which is quite overkill just to hide the fact that i spent the last 5 minutes at a gift site.

    In fact, the fact that my history, cache, address-bar dropdown quick lists etc are all empty is evidence enough that i was doing something i didn’t want people to see.

    If someone sees that your XP start menu quick list is empty is evidence enough that you were trying to hide something.

  49. Anonymous says:

    Apologies if this posts under the ‘clear my tracks’ posting, but couldn’t find how to start a new thread.

    Is there a way to tell IE7 to open a link (from an external source, such as an email) in a new tab of an existing window, rather than opening in a new window? ..such as a command-line switch to iexplore.exe, or a setting change?

    If not, this would be a much desired feature. It would be nice to keep all links opened from a particular source (such as from your email app) in the same window, but in new tabs for each link clicked.

  50. Anonymous says:

    New blog entry, yay. There are just a few quick points that I would like to make. Firstly, I would to expand very slightly on the custamisation feature that has been asked for with the ‘delete all’ option at the bottom(which I definetly agree there should be – let the people choose exactly what info is removed when they hit that button). This allowing people to set when IE 7 does it for you automatically. It would be nice if you could choose from options like automatically delete all history’….. ‘upon start up’, ‘upon shut down’, or after x number of days.

    Equally the ‘private browsing’ option that has been suggested would be nice, so you can stop IE 7 storing any of the info mentioned for that session, regardless of your whatever your regular setting are. This I feel could be implimented in a very simple, user-friendly way, eg. in much the same way as the current ‘work offline’ function is implimeted today, simply as a tickable option in one of the drop down menus, but this would odviously stay ticked all through your browsing session.

    Any other comments would simply continue to echoe what has already been said by others, so far. With that in mind, I’d just like to say that you have a good new feature here, which has the potential to be even better with some additional work.

    Just keep following this blog, as there seem to be a lot of good feedback coming through from it.

    Thanks.

  51. Anonymous says:

    Nick Davis’s feature request would be a great addition. He’s right that browsing history is useful and you don’t want to erase the whole thing just to get rid of a few sites.

  52. Anonymous says:

    Learn from Firefox.

    1.) User should be able to ensure some cookies are not deleted (e.g. Company Web App, Digg, Google) when deleting cookies.

    2.) User should be able (via checklist (that remembers!)) what to clear.

    3.) User should be able to invoke this with one click / key combo.

    PS the "gift" metaphor was quite funny. I think you would be much better off, using a real example.

    "job posting site", "porn", "slashdot @ work", "*linux*", "*hack*", "financial sites", "administrative access logins", "sports, fun, games @ work"

    On the plus side, making this a seperate thread (the cache deletion) was long overdue, and a much appreciated addition.

    Oh, and clearing the address bar, should be a separate option, from the other parts of history (or displayed as a tree, so that user can select individual history items to remove)

  53. Anonymous says:

    Dialog TYPO:

    i never VISTED any websites, ever!

    ^^^^^^

    Gordon

  54. Anonymous says:

    Thanks to Eric for this clear answer to my post:

    Saturday, January 14, 2006 9:57 PM by EricLaw [MSFT]

    Clearly room for more usability improvements there, but thanks for clearing up this mystery.

  55. Anonymous says:

    "reviews on CNet and other sites." PetKnep [MSFT]

    "Given all the expectations, we wanted more within IE 7 for XP, but Microsoft has given us less." Cnet link http://reviews.cnet.com/Microsoft_Internet_Explorer_7_Beta/4505-3514_7-31454661.html?autoplay=true

    Are you not embarrassed? Or are you so diluted with your billions that you can’t see the forest for the trees? Everyone, except the butt kissers here, are throwing rocks at you, and they only are because you are giving them the ammunition.

    These features aren’t new! These features are not revolutionary! There is nothing on this program that isn’t a copy from something else. And yet you still are holding onto it and touting it as if you have made gold from thin air.

    Two weeks from now you will make a blog on your "site preview" option , it’s your answer to the whole tabbed browsing thing, it really is a redundant feature because tabbed browsing is what everyone wants. The only place this would be useful is dial-up. Broadband is the staple of the future and it is of no time to load ten pages in tabbed browsing.

    More diluted thinking and muttled though. Reading through these replies is excruiating, wake up people this is yesterdays technology and they need to be told it.

    Nothing new. Nothing new.

  56. Anonymous says:

    Although I can see the similarities with Firefox’s new "Clear Private Data" tool, I still commend theteam for bringing this tool to IE.

    There is a typo in the history section, but I’m sure this will be fixed before IE 7 is shipped.

    As for the IE gunk, I agree that IE’s file and history cleaning tools never actually delete all files. There are always randomly named folders full of copies of websites and images, as well as large downloads, audio and videos. There are also index.dat files that cannot be deleted. Will these be cleared by the new tool?

  57. Anonymous says:

    Hi IETeam,

    this feature is clearly needed.

    You won´t get much credit for this because it´s mandatory.

    But why in the world you don´t include a DoD-wiping process?

    For an ITPro it´s easy to restore deleted Data.

    And sometimes when i want real privacy the best way would to remove the harddrive and put it in the fireplace. That can´t be..

    So what´s with wiping and what about the indexing files where are there tracks stored too?

  58. Anonymous says:

    "Why don’t you make it a checklist? If I want to delete everything but the cookies, it would still be many clicks to do."

    i also want to delete everything except cookies. firefox has this feature and if i’m gonna switch ie7 needs to have this feature

  59. Anonymous says:

    Indeed it does Alex.

    And what about automatic cleaning?

    That is I do not want it to ask everytime I clean and I want to do it automaticly every time I clear my browser. And of course it remembers my settings. GOD, I hope so?

    Thanks,

    Will

  60. Anonymous says:

    I think this is a very valuable feature and look forward to using it!

    While we are on the topic of history, I have mocked up a different history usage model for IE. The URL is http://www.slickscreen.com , it displays history much like your Tivo.

    IMHO, I think it is more valuable to see "the past" like you actually saw it (and not just links to pages that can have different content). Not saying that the latter isn’t valuable, but both models are valuable imo!

    IE Team: Please consider putting this record/playback functionality into IE (before Google or Firefox does it and it is called "innovative") I don’t remember anyone calling NetCaptor innovative for developing "tabbed browsing" 7 years ago :)

    Keep up the good work!

    Brian Duperrouzel

  61. Anonymous says:

    Wow, It’s amazing, but not surprising, to see a bunch o people so completely out of touch with reality. Clue for the IE team, you guys are MS’s right fielders – you know, the guys that were picked last and put in a position where it was expected that the ball would never be hit to them. MS has to have an IE, to save face, but nobody on earth, except (maybe) you guys, believes it is a product that matters anymore.

    This will be good experience for you guys (who apparently go straight from college to PM) for when you go on to jobs that actually mean something, but you might want to leave this off your resumes. Definitely don’t mention your blogoganda articles for this site.

  62. Anonymous says:

    <<There are always randomly named folders full of copies of websites and images, as well as large downloads, audio and videos. There are also index.dat files that cannot be deleted. Will these be cleared by the new tool?>>

    They’ve already said yes, read the comments.

    As to the question about why they don’t do a secure DoD wipe: What exactly are you doing with your computer? Your IT department can already see your traffic, and if the NSA wants your machine, they’re going to get it another way. And mentioned above, you can DoD wipe freespace using a single command (cipher.exe).

  63. Anonymous says:

    >"This will be good experience for you guys (who apparently go straight from college to PM) for when you go on to jobs that actually mean something, but you might want to leave this off your resumes. Definitely don’t mention your blogoganda articles for this site."

    Get a life.

    One of the two of the Firefox architects designed that browser while he was still in college, so why make such inane comments.

    PM is a role at Microsoft, and doesn’t mean you’re manager of people or anything. See their Jobs page.

  64. Anonymous says:

    "There has been some confusion in the press and blogs regarding whether the next beta will be Q1 or Q2. We just want to confirm that we are aiming for __X__. "

    Agreed. Enough with this softball Q/A.

    When will the damn thing be released? It’s high time this finally got answered.

  65. Anonymous says:

    > No offense to you Uche, but why is the team sending the noob to blog.

    Why not? Do you think it takes a seasoned vet to write a blog post? Or just that graduates should toil in obscurity until they "put in their time?"

    Tough crowd.

  66. Anonymous says:

    Dude did you even read his blog?

    Example:

    "Why would I use this feature?

    I am glad you asked this question. Let’s look at an example of how this feature can be used."

    No Crap? Really? I’m sorry but after waiting three weeks for some good information and we get this condesending spiel, like no one knows what it is.

    What did they expect.

  67. Anonymous says:

    Well that is an ok feature; easy to understand why it doesn’t have checks. A menu editor that allows users to add and remove the items they wish to clear on a regular basis would be much better suited for the job (like customize toolbar for Windows Explorer). The user should also be made aware that there are X number of option menus not being displayed (on their regular basis menu they are viewing) that can be edited back in to the regular menu via the menu editor. Another method would be to simply a lock could be added to keep menu items locked from having their content removed.

    The delete all button should close this window with a temporary prompt created in the foreground that disables the main window while showing the user some nifty animation of ones and zeroes being sucked in to some black hole and then being spit back out as polar radiation (or text that says please wait would work too). The close button should simply be changed to cancel, otherwise you will confuse a lot of people (understatement).

    How about an easy way to edit the host file from C:WINDOWSsystem32driversetc? Pain in the butt to not be able to use my local IP to test things out without having to dig for this file occasionally.

  68. Anonymous says:

    There should at least be a way to automatically clean my private data when I close the browser window

  69. Anonymous says:

    So, according to the recent college graduate, when a person clicks on "Delete Cookie" they are also deleting the userdata store?!

    Many enterprise internal apps depend on the userdata store and the fact that it can retain much more domain data than cookies. Now, the Microsoft Client Experience people are going to make it easy for an innocent –and apparently unrelated– user action to accomplish far more than the user suspected.

    Certainly nothing in the proposed dialog above gives them any warning whatsoever. Why put this devious feature under Delete Cookies anyway? Userdata stores are most often part of form entries.

    At least give the user some warning as you make it easier for them to shoot themselves in the foot and lose work.

  70. Anonymous says:

    Congrats on the Microsoft hire Uche. Watch out for Steve Ballmer though. If you try to get a job with one of the many better companies out there, he’ll throw a chair at you and threaten to kill the competition.

    Just beware at all times.

  71. Anonymous says:

    Thank you, please continue to copy sensible features from Firefox and Opera since this makes things better for your users – these features just make sense after all. One suggestion, use the ctrl+shift+del shortcut for this dialog box that Firefox uses.

    Now when are you planning to implement SVG support? IE8?

  72. Anonymous says:

    All good, copying the features that are standard in other browsers, but;

    Where’s the Adblock feature in IE7?

    It’s been a year or so now, that we’ve all surfed the Internet without ads, so I’m guessing that switching to IE, will require this feature.

  73. Anonymous says:

    "Do you think it takes a seasoned vet to write a blog post?"

    I want hear straight from the horse’s mouth.

    "Tough crowd."

    Demanding customers, demand better products.

  74. Anonymous says:

    "It’s been a year or so now, that we’ve all surfed the Internet without ads, so I’m guessing that switching to IE, will require this feature."

    Yes, and they will probably try to act like they invented it as well.

  75. Anonymous says:

    With the addition of this feature, I’m seeing IE7 becoming a *useable* browser.

    But Firefox is a *great* browser, so you’ve still got a lot of work to do.

  76. Anonymous says:

    <<I want hear straight from the horse’s mouth.>>

    In case you’re curious, that’s why Uche wrote this blog posting– she worked on this feature. While we could have had someone else write it, I think you’d agree that it makes sense to have the feature owner write about it.

    <<Where’s the Adblock feature in IE7?>>

    There are assorted plugins to IE that can offer adblocking features. See http://www.windowsmarketplace.com/content.aspx?ctId=63&userText=internet+explorer&all=1 for lots of IE plugins.

    A plugin set I wrote (see http://www.bayden.com/ietoys/) offers the ability to "clean up" a page for reading in one click.

  77. Anonymous says:

    Where is the inovation in IE7? It’s just a Microsoft version of Firefox. Can you say RIP OFF!

  78. Anonymous says:

    > They’ve already said yes, read the comments.

    As far as I can see, they have only commented on removing files left behind by applications other than IE after clicking "Delete". If you see otherwise, point it out.

    > No offense to you Uche, but why is the team sending the noob to blog.

    The number of people that come here for the sole purpose of slagging off MS or its employees (be they new ones or seasoned) is just amazing. I don’t see a problem at all with a new recruit blogging as long as she knows what she’s talking about, which she obviously does.

  79. Anonymous says:

    I would have to agree that the GUI is rather ugly (as someone about to graduate from college myself, it seems that GUI design is an area that many schools overlook). I agree that checkboxes seem more logical, after all, isn’t that how most of the 3rd party tools that have this feature do it? Why not keep with their style for consistency?

    I also think the fine-tuned controls that people are requesting are a good idea. Personally, I want to keep my cookies. However, I would like to delete all the "ad tracking" cookies that tend to come from 3-4 specific companies. So it would be nice to be able to only delete the ones I want rather than an all/nothing type of deal. The same really goes for everything, I may want to delete my form information for a particular site, for example, I remember one site where IE stored my Social Security Number which I wanted to delete, but I did not want to delete my form info from every other website.

    Out of curiosity, why doesn’t MS post these things before hand? Hopefully you’ll heed some of these suggestions, and if you do, wouldn’t it have been easier to add them during the planning/design phases rather than now, when you have to go back and rewrite code?

  80. Anonymous says:

    "I think you’d agree that it makes sense to have the feature owner write about it."

    Why do I suspect that she was given a set of requirements prepared by someone else, with only limited design leeway?

    Why not a post with an overall status from the real project manager, whoever that is these days. The person who Mr. Balmer holds accountable.

  81. Anonymous says:

    I completely agree with Nick Davis…. it looks VERY suspicious if you suddenly have a completely blank internet history, temporary internet files, etc. Much better would be to be able to disable the storing of the data temporarily, and then I can turn it back on once I’ve bought Rachel those flowers :)

  82. Anonymous says:

    >As far as I can see, they have only commented on removing files left behind by applications other than IE after clicking "Delete". If you see otherwise, point it out.<

    Above EricLaw[MSFT] said: "If you can find this data in any index files, we want to hear about it. We worked to specifically address that issue."

    So it stands to reason that the Index files and other files will be cleared.

  83. Anonymous says:

    <<Why do I suspect that she was given a set of requirements prepared by someone else, with only limited design leeway?>>

    I don’t know, why do you suspect that?

    So called "individual contributor" PMs have remarkable freedom in our designs. Of course there are always tradeoffs and constraints, as in any product (software or not).

    As for where the buck stops for all of IE, read these:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2004/08/13/214403.aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2004/08/17/216075.aspx

  84. Anonymous says:

    Thank you for this helpful feature!

    However, I hope that a technical writer will correct the texts in the dialog box even before beta.

    According to the Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications [2004]:

    - it’s not "webpage", but "Web page"

    - it’s not "website", but "Web site"

    - Button texts use title caps (for example, "Delete Files" instead of "Delete files")

    - Frame titles use title caps

    - Button texts are only followed by … if supplying further information is required after clicking the button. If clicking the button results just in showing a confirmation message box, the button text should not be followed by …

  85. Anonymous says:

    Hmmm, Looks kind of simular to the new ‘Clear Private Data’ in firefox. I just wonder why MS would want to include something like this in there browser. Can MS ever be original?

  86. Anonymous says:

    "Can MS ever be original?"

    Yeah, they could get something out on time.

    *looks at the clock*

    *tick*

    *tock*

    *another firefox user signs up*

    *tick*

    *tock*

  87. Anonymous says:

    This is absolutely rediculous!

    IE lacks basic features for years – they finally add them and they’re "copying Firefox".

    I bet if they didn’t add them most people here would slate IE for not having basic features.

    You people are absolutely pathetic.

  88. Anonymous says:

    Wow.

    Who let the drunks into the soup kitchen?

    Ya know all they ever do is complain about the free chow. "Ya call this French bread? The mensh misshon, now, they know howta bake Frensch bread *hic*"

    It’s a good feature.

    It’s a good blog.

    It’s a good post.

    It’s a free product.

    BTW…does Firefox have to integrate with Group Policy, Outlook, etc? (honestly, I don’t know, but I don’t think so).

    also..

    >>Demanding customers, demand better products.<<

    Don’t you have to pay for something to be a customer? (once again, 100% not sure)

    P.S. Congrats on landing the M$ job Uche.

  89. Anonymous says:

    What the crap? They never claimed it was new or revolutionary. Cut them a break, don’t put words in their mouth.

    Stupid FireFox, they copied IE. IE was the real beginning of HTML rendering </sarcasm> (actually, Netscape before them, and something something before them)

  90. Anonymous says:

    Another bastard WINDOW just for deleting some stuff? Why don’t integrate it on Internet Options window as another pane/tab or whatever

  91. Anonymous says:

    "It’s a free product."

    Not really, you have to buy Windows to use it, therefore it’s not free. It is free to get updates though, which only seems to happen after they release new versions of Windows anyway.

    "What the crap? They never claimed it was new or revolutionary."

    "There is a new feature in IE7… allow the excitement to naturally evolve."

    It would be exciting if it was new and revolutionary, but it isn’t.

  92. Anonymous says:

    Addon Manager in xpsp2 is NOT enough!

    We want per site(domain) management.

    EX. ban AddOn F ON Domain M

    F is Flash mostly!!!

    We hate Make-CPU-Scream Flashes on some potal site! ex. http://news.sina.com.cn every link full of flashit

  93. Anonymous says:

    <<However, I hope that a technical writer will correct the texts in the dialog box even before beta. According to the Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications >>

    Peter– Good eye.

    It’s not my area, but I should mention that the Windows Vista version of the style guide has undergone some revisions. I believe the current text is consistent with the style guide, but I’ll be sure to check. Thanks!

  94. Anonymous says:

    To Nick Davis

    Thanks for your comment. 10 out of 10. I’m still wiping the tears. Here’s a though for everyone – next time you want to *ahem* buy a gift for a loved one and want to clear your tracks, why not try *ahem* firefox. I let firefox alert me when a site wants to set a cookie. It’s a great feature. I can deny a cookie, allow a cookie to be set permanently or just for a session. And its real easy to delete cookies in each category one at a time or via multi select. I hope this has been implemented in IE7 or I simply won’t use it. The cookie management in firefox is too important. To everyone, good luck in purchasing *ahem* gifts for loved ones.

  95. Anonymous says:

    Hey, checkbox guys… you see the "…" following the text on each of those buttons? That means there are dialogs that appear when you click them. Dialogs with multiple items on them. These aren’t simply "click me and I’ll delete all these" things else they’d not have the ellipsis.

    How do you propose you ask/inform the users of all the options when they check multiple items? A series of many dialogs popping up one after another? What if you cancel one because you don’t understand the options, does it stop the remaining ones from coming up so you start over? What if you cancelled because it’s obviously going to take to long too answer these things… do the remaining ones keep coming up? Hmmm, how about a big, crappy, scrolling html page showing the options for the selected ones? Enough of that crap in XP!? and "Ohhh jeez, I gotta answer all that!"

    Come on guys, if you’re going to complain about windows UI you ought to do more thinking about UIs than that…. checkboxes… sheeesh.

  96. Anonymous says:

    I was searching and happened upon this.

    Chart of daily, hourly, minute download charts of firefox browser and thunderbird.

    http://staff.osuosl.org/~kveton/mofo

    Microsoft really dropped the ball on this one.

    Microsoft is cute though. Pretending as if they are relevant anymore.

  97. Anonymous says:

    "Well it’s about time you finally posted something new in this blog, so thanks for that." – Ron

    "You people are absolutely pathetic." – Mike

    If you worked for MS on IE would you desire to post something on here? I’m not defending MS at all but if you’re (you’re as in to everyone this applies to) going to post a reply to the team’s posts at least may a critical suggestion as others and I have in the past. I believe one can view the IE blog as an attempt by the IE team to avoid having IE7 become Netscape 5 and if you’re not posting in some sort of relevant reply, about how to improve features, what specs need to become supported, or comment about how horrible the GUI is then just don’t bother posting in the first place.

  98. LarryOsterman says:

    "Where is the inovation in IE7? It’s just a Microsoft version of Firefox. Can you say RIP OFF! "

    It’s there if you have sense to look for it. Check out the video with Margaret Cobb (http://hive.net/Member/forums/8446/ShowPost.aspx), she points out a couple of things in IE7 that nobody else has (the one click view of all your tabs is a simple example)

  99. Anonymous says:

    "Where is the inovation in IE7? It’s just a Microsoft version of Firefox. Can you say RIP OFF! "

    "It’s there if you have sense to look for it.Check out the video with Margaret Cobb "

    ——————————————–

    Yes, way to funny. Why is it that it’s only the ie7 team that is able to distinguish these "valuable" innovations.

    Most, if not all say it’s a direct copy of other browsers. I personally wouldn’t know though, because they are sure as hell taking long enough copying them.

  100. Anonymous says:

    I think the way Maxthon currently presents the options is a better way.

    #1. You have the check boxes for cookies, temp file, etc. so you can do all our none.

    #2. You also can do all of this on the close of the browser each time automatically. So for all the people who what to always cover their tracks you can do that too.

    Please take more ideas from Matxthon :) Especailly highlight and drag searching.

  101. Anonymous says:

    Neal: "Hey, checkbox guys… you see the "…" following the text on each of those buttons? That means there are dialogs that appear when you click them. … How do you propose you ask/inform the users of all the options when they check multiple items?"

    There is this beautiful control in Windows called a TreeView. It lets you have items, and then subitems so something like:

    [X] Delete Cookies

    |– [ ] Whatever choice #1 is

    `– [X] Whatever choice #2 is

    Is that really so hard? It’s a style that has been used in many programs for many years. Then you avoid having 5+ new dialogs and it’s easy to delete multiple things with the click of a single button.

    Btw, if MS gives us a screenshot of those additional dialogs then it would be easier for me and others to propose a nice GUI.

  102. Anonymous says:

    YES YES YES! I’ve wanted this feature for a long long time. Currently I use The MS Anti Spyware tool to erase my tracks. I’m so excited to get my hands on IE 7. Its been way too long.

  103. Anonymous says:

    <<Microsoft is cute though. Pretending as if they are relevant anymore.>>

    Maybe they have degrees in math or something. They’re probably confused and think that their 85%+ marketshare is a meaningful number somehow.

    Why don’t you head back to alt.firefox.fanboy and hunker down for impact? When IE7 releases, it’s going to be a lot harder to pimp Firefox.

  104. Anonymous says:

    Hi,<br>I’m the UA/tech writer for Internet Explore UI and Help. <p> Peter, on your comment about Web site, Web page, etc…, under the old MSTP style guide, you’re right. However, we are now using a new MSXUA style that’s been updated for Vista. It has a number of areas that supercede the MSTP, and you’re noticing some of them. We follow the Vista style which includes:

    <p>

    <ul>

    <li><b>Website</b> (one word, only cap’d if it’s the start of a sentence or in a title).</li>

    <li><b>Webpage</b> (same as above)</li>

    <li><b>Web</b> (lower case unless start of sentence)</li>

    <li>Sentence capitalization on buttons and frames</li>

    <li>Ellipses (…) for buttons that require interaction or further data, including confirmation messages.</li>

    </ul>

    <p>

    In our style guides we now look to the MSXUA guide first, then the MSTP. What this means is all new text that goes into IE is the new style. If we touch a page, we’re making it the new style. The changes have causes some questions from devs, PM’s and testers who are familiar with the older style. I’ve explained this several times :).

    <p>

    On the button text capitalization, up until now, our style guides have been pretty rigid. However a very recent (this week) change is that we can now have the option to use title capitization on buttons where it blends better with legacy text. Since IE has a lot of legacy text, I’ll be working with Uche and my editor on what changes (if any) we need to do in a later fit & finish review. <p> Thanks for your comments.

  105. Anonymous says:

    @TonyH: We’ve actually improved the speed of the cache clearing code, and the default size of the cache is smaller than before (which actually results in better overall performance for most people). I haven’t seen cache clearing take more than about 30 seconds lately. We show a progress meter while deletion is in progress, and it goes away when it’s done.

    There will be a "Reset All Defaults" button in IE7– stay tuned for more info.

  106. Anonymous says:

    Maybe they have degrees in math or something. They’re probably confused and think that their 85%+ marketshare is a meaningful number somehow.

    ———————————

    Oh yes, Firefox has been progressing so slow because of Microsoft’s "reign of terror" in the browser war "2". Tell me what was Microsofts percentage a few months ago? At roughly 350+ downloads a minute, currently, how much more does that subtract?

    With Microsoft’s incompetence in being able to give a release date. They are forced to standardize with Firefox design. They are just now beginning to get vital features that other’s have had for years. Oh, yes…The terror is alive….

    I’m sure Firefox is just quaking. Hell, by the time these yahoo’s(pun) finally figure it out and get it released in 2 or 3 or 4 or… well however many months. Firefox will be 350+ a minute, at least, until Firefox’s TV spots arrive shortly which will more than triple that number.

    What did Netscape start out at again in browser war 1. or BW1? How long did it take for Microsoft to pass critical threshold? Hm… Oh, yes. The terror. Oh the horror.

  107. PatriotB says:

    Jay,

    Thanks for the update. In any event, the capitalization of the word "Information" (top of dialog) must be wrong.

    Personally, my opinion of these style guide changes is that it’s going to cause a lot more inconsistency. Older third party apps which follow the old guidelines will clash with the OS dialog boxes. And not to mention all the old dialog boxes in the OS that probably won’t be touched.

    And personally, I think that the buttons look worse without Title Case. That "Delete all" button looks pretty weak.

  108. Anonymous says:

    I like the feature – it’s one of those – why wasn’t it there in the first place ones ;-)

    I think this is one of those areas where people who ‘know’ want more options, and people who ‘don’t’ just want a way to ‘secure’ their machines. Is an ‘advanced’ option a way forward – a way of letting people choose to delete all of one option or the whole set, or those who want to can choose advanced and just clean the specific sets of things they want rid of? Or does that just complicate things further.

    Forgive me if I’m repeating someone, feel free to flame!

    Stewart

  109. Anonymous says:

    Jay,

    Thanks for the clarification!

    I look forward to the new style guides. Are drafts already available somewhere (MSDN?)?

    While I might agree with "webpage", I disagree with sentence style caps for buttons. As PatriotB has pointed out, it weakens the appearance and even affordance of buttons (most buttons in the real world also use title caps).

    You should really reconsider this change, at least under XP.

    Thank you!

    PS: IE6 SP2 introduced another style guide violation in the Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box: The two check boxes should not be followed by a dot ("Play a sound when a pop-up is blocked." and "Show Information Bar when a pop-up is blocked.")

  110. Anonymous says:

    What about the history of terms entered into text fields in various websites too? I don’t mean forms. Is this stored in the cookies? I’ve never found it, or a way to delete it.

    E.g., if I go to msn.com and start typing in the Search the Web field, say the first letter I type is "a", then immediately all the words starting with "a" I’ve ever typed into that field appear in a popup — if some of those words are (err) "gifts for my loved ones", then this can be embarrassing.

    Please find a way for us to be able to delete such information up to a fine-grained level (per term as well as all, because I may like to keep some or most of the words as well as sometimes delete all) — your new dialog box would be a good place to add this functionality.

    BTW, as with others above, I too support having a "private" browsing session mode in *addition* to your new dialog.

  111. Anonymous says:

    <<What about the history of terms entered into text fields in various websites too? I don’t mean forms. E.g., if I go to msn.com and start typing in the Search the Web field>>

    Stewart: Actually, what you’re describing ~is~ a form. When you clear autocomplete for forms, this data will be cleared. This is possible in IE6 as well, but the button is buried in Tools | Internet Options | Content.

    As for deleting on a term-by-term basis– this is also possible in both IE6 and IE7. When you’re typing and you get the little dropdown of autocomplete terms, you can use the down arrow to highlight terms in the list. When a term is highlighted, hit Delete on your keyboard and the term will be removed.

  112. Anonymous says:

    "As for deleting on a term-by-term basis– this is also possible in both IE6 and IE7. When you’re typing and you get the little dropdown of autocomplete terms, you can use the down arrow to highlight terms in the list. When a term is highlighted, hit Delete on your keyboard and the term will be removed."

    I’d like to see that same feature available for the Address bar history dropdown list.

  113. Anonymous says:

    "It would be exciting if it was new and revolutionary, but it isn’t."

    So, Ron, why are people reacting that Microsoft is heralding this as the greatest thing ever? They aren’t, and don’t put words in their mouth. (You know, maybe some people ought to go and learn about this thing called "Critical Thinking")

  114. Anonymous says:

    The Firefox 1.5 version of this is a lot more intuitive using checkboxes (mentioned by previous posters) but also has options to automatically clean up selected items on exit.

    Jay Munro > "On the button text capitalization, up until now, our style guides have been pretty rigid. However a very recent (this week) change is that we can now have the option to use title capitization on buttons where it blends better with legacy text. Since IE has a lot of legacy text, I’ll be working with Uche and my editor on what changes (if any) we need to do in a later fit & finish review."

    However, I have to say that the change to the Windows style guide is a brain dead decision particularly as it doesn’t sound like you’re converting all the existing text in the OS to match the new style guidelines. So this makes applications included with the OS even less consistent with each other, certainly makes Mac OS X more appealing to those who like systems that look refined and polished. So if you change your style guide then modify all MS apps to be consistent with it, also make a lot of noise about the new style guide so that makers of other apps know about them.

    In the end it’d have been much easier to keep the style guide as-is.

  115. Anonymous says:

    Anyone know of any utilities which allow you to easily do the same thing for IE6? Thanks.

  116. Anonymous says:

    I’d like to see "remove this" when right clicking on an autocomplete suggestion. Sometimes I put in the wrong url and it’s extremely annoying.

    I’d also like to see something that allows autocomplete to have priority. In example if I type…

    .com/c

    and autocomplete gives me these two options…

    .com/cgi-bin/…

    and…

    .com/community/…

    I would like to be able to drag and drop whichever autocomplete item I want to be the first (so I can type c, hit the down key, then enter) instead of having to deal with the current base method.

    So dragging and dropping an autocomplete item or at least perhaps right clicking it would bring it to the top and autoselect it for me. As far as I know no browser has this (yet).

    It gets old reading flames from both sides…

  117. Anonymous says:

    Matt, MS are the ones implying we should be excited about this new feature of IE.

    I still say the term "Delete Browsing History" could be confusing, and the placement of the "Delete All" button is questionable.

  118. Anonymous says:

    Wow, you guys seem to be taking a little more flack in this blog than normal, though I’m sure much of it is coming from the extended amount of time it took to get this post up – must have left people without a place to rant for a while. So lesson here is, please don’t leave it so long between posts, lol.

  119. Anonymous says:

    "So lesson here is, please don’t leave it so long between posts, lol."

    That’s all fine and dandy, but the reality of the situation is much more severe.

    Meanwhile, 504,000 more people downloaded Firefox, since this same time, yesterday.

    Tomorrow another 500,000 and the next day another 500,000, and the next.

    Yes, please do keep us updated. :)

  120. Anonymous says:

    Seeing any improvement in IE is nice, but what about important things like CSS improvement or full XHTML support ?

    Meanwhile, Firefox, Opera, Safari … are just kicking IE on this ground ! Lots of web site are letting IE users not in a confortable situation as those sites are best viewed on alternative browser than MS one !!! This remember me the story about a browser who used to be a leader but has failed to evolved … something like Net … NetKindom ;-)

  121. Anonymous says:

    When is this wretched browser going

    to be released anyway?…

  122. Anonymous says:

    "When is this wretched browser going

    to be released anyway?…"

    Who knows, that’s the whole point. They would rather lose out on entire demographs of people ever single day, then fill people in on what’s going on.

    These numbers are nothing to sneeze at. It’s like losing Denver yesterday, Seattle Today, Washington DC the next, so on and so one.

    But let’s sit here and chat about this feature that we should have implemented, in a browser we should have created, three years ago.

    Microsoft is single handedly tightening their own diamond noose. Google with the release of their "pack" is kicking the living S#@# out of them, and microsoft is taking it like CHUMPS!

  123. Anonymous says:

    Oh come on already! At least for the first time in their history, MS are trying to involve the public in the steps leading up to a new release, and all some people can do it post about FF’s growing market share, the lag between posts etc etc. That’s completely lame. Rather than waste time making posts like that, why don’t you make yourselves useful by providing constructive feedback to the team? If you can’t even manage that, then nobody can help you…

  124. Anonymous says:

    "MS are trying to involve the public in the steps leading up to a new release, and all some people can do it post about FF’s growing market share, the lag between posts etc etc."

    Yes, and the public is trying to involve Microsoft in the fact that they are losing populations equivalent to major cities DAILY. Yes, so let’s sit and sulk for them.

    So, How about it Mr. Gates? Are you going to release it already. Or are you just going to throw in the towel and http://www.getfirefox.com

    You secretly have it on your computer don’t you Billy?

  125. Anonymous says:

    Ruben, I know that your comment wasn’t directed simply towards me, but equally at all those people who make the constant remarks as to how fantastic Firefox is (don’t FF have their own blogs for that?), but I would just like to mention how my comment (about the lag between posts) was only meant as a bit of a light-hearted remark, with no offence intended – something I’d hoped would have been indicated by the lol at the end of it. Secondly, I’d also like to say that I already have posted something that I personally feel is ‘constructive feedback to the team’.

    Equally, I do happen to be in complete agrement with you about these blogs being a very positive thing from MSFT and something that I now quite enjoy reading (part of the reason I like seeing regular new blog posts).

    Another thing that I agree with is the fact that that comments like ‘Firefox rules’, (errr, no they don’t) or ‘MS suck’, (equally no they don’t), or that ‘they’re just copying’ (oh the shock, horror – ‘we better not include that feature since it’s similar to something FF/safari/opera has’), just don’t help anyone.

    Anyways, rant over, thanks to anyone still reading, lol.

  126. Anonymous says:

    Oh, one other thing that anoys users to no end, is that the multi-dialog confirmations for deleting history (cookies, cache, history, etc.) is the placement of the dialogs.

    If you *INSIST* on using a confirm dialog for each (read: Don’t, it !@#$ing anoying), then at least place them all in the same general location. Why must the "history" dialog be centered on the DESKTOP, when the others are not?

    Please tell me that this has been fixed.

  127. Anonymous says:

    Are you people serious? FireFox and the 500lb Gorrilia just took a dump on Redmond and are dropping h-bombs across the globe. It’s time for Bill to finally address this situation and send out the zookeeper.

    There is no other place to ask these questions and we keep getting ignored. Do you think the population will want to touch IE7 after seeing FireFox and having to put up with IE6 for so long? Soon every browser globally will see Google.

    There are only two possibilities. Either give us some hope with a date. Or face the extinction of MSN on the net.

    Besides, don’t you realize the only reason they have this open forum now? The know open source and community works well. And as we are seeing with the rapid FireFox downloads, too well.

  128. Anonymous says:

    Excellent feature! I have done the same thing with 3rd party software with my current IE. But you could make it a bit easer if you combined some of the aspects. Like don’t you think that passwords & form data could be deleted with a single click?

  129. Anonymous says:

    I thought you could clear your tracks in IE6 under Tools > Internet Options. Not exactly new stuff that inspires me to upgrade!

  130. Anonymous says:

    EricLaw [MSFT] wrote:

    "So called "individual contributor" PMs have remarkable freedom in our designs."

    Give the doublespeak a rest. Can you guys just answer the questions that your customers are asking?

    1) How do we provide beta feedback?

    2) Did you hear us about the Menu bar placement?

    3) What standards are in, and which are out?

    4) Has the Beta been pushed to Q2?

    5) Is IE7 to be released before Vista or not?

    P.S. I wonder if there is something about Beta 2 that you guys not saying. Remember Beta 1?

    "Oh, by the way , this one is only for MSDN subscribers"

    So come March-June…

    "Oh, by the way, this beta requires…"

  131. Anonymous says:

    "Who knows, that’s the whole point. They would rather lose out on entire demographs of people ever single day, then fill people in on what’s going on."

    I can see it now. MS says "IE7 will be released April 2, 2006." Then there is a major bug discovered. MS how has two options, either A release it with the bug (which will lead to "MS always makes buggy software!") or delay the release (which will lead to "MS can’t even follow the release dates they set!"). So what’s the point? As a software developer myself I NEVER set a permanent release date. Things change. I might hope to have something done by the end of the month, but then it turns out to be more work than I anticipated and therefore takes longer. Thats a very real situation. Why confine yourself to some artificially imposed deadline when all it can possibly do is hurt the product?

  132. Anonymous says:

    Before I get into the topic at hand, I’d like to point something out for Shredderx1, ><, Adam, etc.. While some of you enjoy going of on your "Firefox market share is up!", "Download counts are flying!", "[Insert all the other marketing hype Mozilla wants]!", and so on and so forth, in the grand schemes of things it means very little since most of what you base your "data" on is flawed in the first place. Hoewver, that’s not to say Firefox’s market share hasn’t increased, but it is in no way shape or form close to putting Internet Explorer in any dire situation. The IE Team still, and for many years to come, provides the web browsing experiance the majority of the world will rely upon. So instead of inserting Firefox domination, woes of Microsoft, and other tangents (Like my own I might add…), we should be concentrating on giving the team concise, constructive, and supportive information from the view of the general user and that of the majority posting here: the power user. In fact, we should be far less concerned with the browser people are using in the first place (Be it IE, Opera, Safari, Konq., Firefox, etc.), and working together to make all of them more useful to everyone. Will this include adding features other browsers offer? Well, of course it will, but keep in mind no amout of "You copied it!" post is ever correct. While the idea may have stemed from seeing it implemented in another browser the implementation is almost always different and I’m afraid it’s always going to be more difficult than "cutting and pasteing".

    Whew, now with that long tangent out of the way, to the topic at hand…

    Now, Ms. Enuha and the rest of the IE Team reading this, I do like the general layout of the box from the point of view of a "normal user". It’s explained rather well, laid out nicely, with easy to understand button presses which I would have no trouble explaining the use of to my MBA holding friends… or the heads of the companies we are contracted too. I think for the people complaining of it being ugly, well, K.I.S.S is the line of words I’d use there. It’s a box for deleteing data, why does it have to be pretty? Although, it still looks pretty nice as far as a box with such a high standing job could afford…

    So now we arrive at the side I have a bit of reservations about: the power user. Will I be able to selectivly choose options within the overall category? Or, as others have pointed out, do you plan to add a feature that will just delete for the session? Those are things I’m most interested in. Although, honestly, as someone else pointed out, just giving me the option to delete the URL from the address bar would be all I really need. I can take the few extra steps to do manual clean up for stuff I want to keep hidden from others. After all, power users are supposed to like to dig into things right? We don’t need no one button solution! (Grammer error intended for those of you not English inclined… ;) )

    Finally we arrive at my job (one I hate too by the way…) as an IT Consultant running support for Schools & Businesses. You’ve already mentioned giving administrators the ability to turn certain features of your implentation off, but I’m curious as to which ones exactly? Is that something you can get into or do I just have to wait for the beta and come back complaining then? Hehe.

    Anyway, that’s my thoughts, concerns, and questions… None of which are that important, but I just got around to finding the time to jump in on the blog aside from my drive by readings…

    - Andrew

  133. Anonymous says:

    "I can see it now. MS says "IE7 will be released April 2, 2006." Then there is a major bug discovered."

    Hey, guess what. This thing has been tested, and tested, and tested, every single day not only by the MS team, but by thousands of genuises like yourself day in and day out for over a year, has been in development for how long? It has been shown to the media and displayed in public at CES. There are no major bugs. The only major bug is Microsoft itself. How about you let them answer this one, finally.

    Meanwhile they lost another major us city today in terms of download numbers to Firefox. Their stock remains flat, same as it has for the last five years. They need to answer some of these questions.

  134. Anonymous says:

    Please allow individual entry deletion out of the address-bar dropdown using SHIFT+DEL like Firefox does.

    That way when someone types the wrong address, it can be easily removed from the dropdown without having to clear everything.

    ps. I also agree that you should have a ‘Privacy Mode’ or the ability to allow trusted sites data to be excluded from a ‘complete whipe’

  135. Anonymous says:

    @Eric Law

    Re: IE Toys as an alternative in IE for Adblock.

    So, I read this, and figured, hey! cool!, I must have some how missed this over the past 5 years.

    Downloaded, and installed it.

    WTF!? Are you serious, the right-click "Delete Images" option, removes all images from the page!

    It doesn’t let me selectively remove ads… or flash ads, or multi-nested-insane iframes…

    It doesn’t even remember that I’ve asked to have the images deleted when I re-visit the page! WTF!? What’s the point!

    I concur with many on this comment thread, MS, its time to really wake up, and realize that you need to ship. Not next year, or next quarter, or next month, or next week. You need to ship in Q1 2005. Since this isn’t possible, you are bleeding out, every hour, of every day, until you do. Most sadly, when you do ship, you will still be massively short on the expectations. I too, hope that you have already laid out IE7.5 or IE 8 on the roadmap, and plan to ship it, BEFORE Q1 2007!!!! If not, you will have officially lost the browser wars for good.

    Man, even my Grandma uses Firefox, going out of her way (without provocation from me), to download it on Dialup no less, because she heard there was something out there other than IE.

    >>> That was her qualification!!!! She didn’t care what browser it was, just as long as it wasn’t IE, because she was sick of all the popups, and she didn’t want to have to install a toolbar, just to get rid of them.

    The best part, (which I got the most giggles from), was that she included all the stupid spawned IE windows, in her definition of popups. Yes, you heard it right. Just the simple design flaw, of your MDI(less) browser, was enough to make her switch!

    Then I showed her Adblock! and like everyone else, she ain’t going back, not today, not tomorrow, and quite likely, ever.

    I don’t want to be rude, but there is only one thing to say.

    SHIP THE ******* PRODUCT ALREADY!

  136. Anonymous says:

    "Hey, guess what. This thing has been tested, and tested, and tested, every single day not only by the MS team, but by thousands of genuises like yourself day in and day out for over a year… [etc.]" – Adam

    While IE6/Beta 1 has been "tested, tested, and tested again", their internal builds have in no way been put through those kinds of test. Ever download a nightly build of Firefox (As an example since it is your browser of choice.)? Ever have it dance and make you pancakes instead of browsing the web? Those are the types of things that happen as you add new features. Once they lock everything down for Beta 2, they’ll test it hard and then release it for testing. Betas may still be testing releases, but people still expect them to, you know, work. People, for example, like yourself. When Beta 2 releases, it may very well break, dance and make pancakes, and perhaps even buy you a new dress, but the most important thing is the team feels it’s ready and that’s the most important thing. Mozilla, or the Firefox team anyway, doesn’t release until it’s ready either, so what the big deal of this entire Microsoft waiting to release is about I don’t know. Plus, you must keep in mind, outside our little worlds, Microsoft has tons more users than Mozilla could dream of in setups that even God (Or whomever your diety of choice is…) couldn’t imagine. They have to be ready for those as well. So it takes time and time it will take… at least that’s what our internal team likes to tell us…

  137. Anonymous says:

    Channnel Nine Signup Is Down

    Just thought I’d let you know here, since posting here actually works.

    Just tried to sign up, to raise my beefs with those that *might* (a) listen, and (b) [holding my breath] might take action.

    Site returns all requests with "Not accepting signups, or server error"

    I’m guessing ASP doesn’t handle scalability as well as PHP, or Java, or… oh dood, this is too easy!

  138. Anonymous says:

    And real quick because this is starting to get kinda annoying…

    For Steve G. and anyone else, AdBlock is NOT, I repeat NOT, part of Firefox. NO browser company offically supports the blocking of ads that I know of. While it’s true Firefox has a built in plugin system that can be -used- to block ads, it certainly isn’t anything that IE couldn’t produce as a plugin either if someone were so inclined to do so for free. So, for the love of somebody named Pete, quit throwin’ AdBlock out there as a part of Firefox until it’s either offically adopted by or added into the browser itself.

  139. Anonymous says:

    @Andrew

    After reading your reply to Adam, I had to laugh.

    Andrew, you are right, these things take time, but you are missing one HUGE point.

    If Microsoft didn’t make the mistake, of adding VBScript and ActiveX part of the Web Browser, and integrating it with the CORE functionality of the Operating System, we wouldn’t be in this mess. IE7 would have shipped in 2003, and we would be using IE8, anxiously awaiting IE9 to come out of beta.

    When MS decided to use the "Its part of Windows" line, to save face with the D.O.J. they shot themselves in the foot. It saved them then, but it totally screwed them on the path forward.

    Sorry guys, game over.

  140. Anonymous says:

    @Andrew

    Everyone knows Adblock isn’t part of Firefox. But that is EXACTLY why Firefox Rocks. The Users decide what is wanted, needed, and they go ahead and grab it.

    Does Mozilla actively push the extension? no way. But go to the main download page, and Presto! there it is, in the Top 5.

    The difference is, that users want to download Firefox extensions. Every time a user gets confronted with the choice in IE? Its a different story… hmm is this one of those ActiveX things? yikes, no thanks, move along.

    ActiveX has been so tightly associated with viruses, malware, spyware, adware, and performance issues, that no one wants to touch it.

    I look forward to the option in IE7, of turning it off completely.

  141. Anonymous says:

    "After reading your reply to Adam, I had to laugh.

    Andrew, you are right, these things take time, but you are missing one HUGE point… [etc.]" – Steve G.

    I’m not sure I missed the point… I’d liken it to having a different view of things; let me explain…

    From the point of view of an everyday home user, VBScript & ActiveX go out of their way in pissing me off as does the annoying intergration of the browser with the Operateing system (Though, "Its part of Windows" is, in fact, true for all the versions in active support.). Do I wish they would of did that differently? Sure I do…

    However, from the point of someone who does a lot of work with many companies that make more money than almost (if not all) of us combined together on here, ActiveX and IE really goes a long way to streamlining their business. ActiveX, in truth, is a VERY powerful tool when used for highly specialized internal features that companies update and change constently. Could they use other things? Sure, but none that are intergrated and can be tweaked quite as easily as IE. Granted, XUL can do much of the same things, but it takes more time and isn’t quite as good for those instances.

    It’s like most things in the world, there are two sides to everything. The only way they could really get around that is releasing two versions of the browser and we’ve saw how popular that idea is with people… (Mozilla dropping Mozilla anyone?… That sounds funny!)

    As for what you had to say about AdBlock and Firefox’s (way over hyped) extensions, I do agree that’s what makes Firefox appealing. However, referring to those big pile of stats everyone likes to throw out, most people (and I work with A LOT of people…) never download extensions for Firefox and, more importantly, don’t have much idea they are there. They are the users that everyone seems to forget makes up the 80-something percent of the world that won’t ever really care about Firefox. (In fact, you admitted to showing your grandmother AdBlock… would she have found it on her own? Would she of cared if you hadn’t shown her? )

    I guess the civil point I’m trying to make is there are two very distint worlds that IE has to serve that Firefox doesn’t have to worry about right now… they sometimes require things that many of us hate, loath, and would burn down certain buildings to have changed, but they are here now and we just have to make the best of it. And, why is that you ask? Because it isn’t "Sorry guys, game over.", it’s "We’re still the market leader, will be when Vista ships, and will continue to be #1 for many years to come…" and that’s just the reality no matter how much any of us like our alternatives…

  142. Anonymous says:

    Hey Andrew. How ’bout you pipe down and let Microsoft answer these questions. You stated it.

    "so what the big deal of this entire Microsoft waiting to release is about I don’t know."

    That’s right you don’t know. You’re not Microsoft. Get of your soapbox and let company answer for themselves. They are not mice, stop pretending they are fragile little beings. If this big bad company can’t handle a little flack for leaving us in the cold for the past month, then god help them, because your "non-info" is meaningless.

    So again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    When is it out Microsoft??????????????????????

  143. Anonymous says:

    <<I look forward to the option in IE7, of turning it off completely. >>

    The option to disable ActiveX exists in every version of IE, and IE7 is in no way unique in that regard. Tools | Internet Options | Security. Disable ActiveX for the Internet zone. Done.

    <<[IEToys] doesn’t even remember that I’ve asked to have the images deleted when I re-visit the page! WTF!? What’s the point! >>

    The point is that it’s about 5 lines of script code written in about 5 minutes, and it makes it easy to read online newspapers and the like. Writing a fuller-featured adblocker in IE is also entirely possible, but a task I don’t have the interest to undertake.

    It will be interesting to see if adblocking plugins end up strangled by their own success. Today, plugins work because site authors have looked at the marketshare of such products and decided it’s not worth the effort to try to defeat them. Once a significant number of users have adblockers, the sites are going to get smarter and rewrite their ad-serving urls such that they are indistinguishable from desired-content URLs.

    …And then the whole arms race begins again.

  144. Anonymous says:

    "a task I don’t have the interest to undertake."

    If that’s not flame bait, I don’t know what is. Seriously, think about what you just said… I’m not targeting you specifically, but I’d say you just summed up the difference between community driven development and MS development (I’m not saying an ad blocker should be standard, btw).

    MS asks for a lot of feedback and suggestions, but they always seem to fall back on inside research and opinions. They’ve said the most requested fixes for IE will be addressed for IE7, but those requests were all standard 4-5 years ago anyway (PNG and CSS for eg).

    I would at least like to hear the IE Team respond to particular suggestions and explain why or why not they will incorporate those suggestions.

    Example:

    User says: "Why does the ‘Clear All’ button have to be beside the ‘Close’ button?"

    MS Replies: "We thought about the placement of this button however we could not find another way to incorporate it in this design. Do you have any suggestions?"

    User replies: "Well I don’t really know, is there a prompt when a user clicks on the ‘Clear All’ button? Maybe that would avoid people from making mistakes."

    Get what I’m saying?

    People become anxious when they’re ignored, hence why everyone seems a little agitated on this blog.

  145. Anonymous says:

    Just rip what Firefox got, their stuff is good. Your proposed implementation have some drawbacks (mentioned above).

    (one thing that strucks me, why doesn’t IE just fork FF into a browser of their own.. (or give up IE and preinstall FF) that way they wouldn’t have to reinvent the wheel 1000 times..)

  146. Anonymous says:

    I’ve watched and read this blog for months now, and I have to jump in now.

    EricLaw stated "Disable ActiveX for the Internet zone. Done." in reply to the ability to entirely disable ActiveX.

    I beg to disagree, there are many cases out there where this was cracked. Setting a flag, don’t not turn it off. The internal code needs [as was apparently added in 7], an exchange broker to physically cut the communications. Additionaly, you need to go into 4 separate zones to turn this off (we’ve all see the escalation bugs) and then you are stuck with all the other apps that embed it. (many of them run under higher rights access).

  147. Anonymous says:

    <i>Hey, checkbox guys… you see the "…" following the text on each of those buttons? That means there are dialogs that appear when you click them. Dialogs with multiple items on them. These aren’t simply "click me and I’ll delete all these" things else they’d not have the ellipsis.

    How do you propose you ask/inform the users of all the options when they check multiple items?</i>

    At the moment, the "Delete All" button doesn’t have the ellipsis after it, which implies that it can delete multiple items without asking the user for extra information. Presumably if it can do that for all 5 options, it could do it just as well for 3 out of the 5. Alternately, it may be that the buttons aren’t following the normal convention (i.e. "Delete All" should have an ellipsis or the others shouldn’t), but without actually running the app it’s hard to be specific.

    As for the general Firefox vs IE debate, could you all please give it a rest? Personally I think that both browsers have their pros and cons (e.g. IE is better at SVG and Firefox is better at MathML), but I don’t think that repeating the same thing over and over again is going to make anybody else change their mind.

  148. Anonymous says:

    I think that this is the last time I look at this Blogg. Microsoft might enjoy wasting their time. They are no longer going to have the privelidge of wasting mine. If IE 7.0 hasn’t hit the street by the end of first quarter 2006, I for one won’t even bother to download it, as it will be obscelete even before it is released.

    I thought Microsoft was Software Publisher. They seem to migrated into Futurology. If you want some weird insight into how the future might in 2010, just have a look at XP and IE 6.0, because from where I am standing that is right where we will still be!

  149. Anonymous says:

    "Hey, guess what. This thing has been tested, and tested, and tested, every single day not only by the MS team, but by thousands of genuises like yourself day in and day out for over a year, has been in development for how long? It has been shown to the media and displayed in public at CES. There are no major bugs."

    To begin with, I never called myself a genius. How do you know exactly that there are no major bugs? I mean Windows is probably tested 10x more than IE is, and yet… guess what? Major bugs exist! So please tell me how you know IE7 has no major bugs? Have you analyzed each and every line of IE7’s source code for technical correctness? I think not.

    "Meanwhile they lost another major us city today in terms of download numbers to Firefox."

    Who cares? You know, I see quite a bit of statistics cited for Firefox and I don’t believe them. To begin with, Firefox is cross-platform, IE is not. If you want to cite Firefox download statistics, you must limit yourself to Windows, you can’t count the million Linux users that downloaded it. I’ve yet to see anyone provide the statistics of Windows Firefox users. Also note that downloads don’t equate to actual users. I have 8 PCs, each of these 8 PCs has a copy of Firefox on it. I’ve used Firefox about 3 times and only on 1 of those 8 PCs. So 8 downloads equates to about 15 minutes worth of Firefox browsing.

    "Their stock remains flat, same as it has for the last five years. They need to answer some of these questions."

    I suggest you learn how the stock market works. Why exactly do you believe a FREE product is what is holding their stock back? As an investor myself, I’d say ditch IE and focus on the products that make money. Also speaking from an investors perspective I’d say a company should NOT announce release dates. Again, MS says April 2nd, this drives the stock price up. However, on April 1st it turns out it will be delayed till April 15th. Now the stock price plummets on rumours that something is seriously wrong.

    So please, before you come here and make yourself look like an "I love Firefox and even if it was the bane of existence, I’d still love it!" uneducated, irrational, person, please get your facts straignt.

  150. Anonymous says:

    "How do you know exactly that there are no major bugs? I mean Windows is probably tested 10x more than IE is, and yet… guess what? Major bugs exist!"

    I guess if you can’t deduct the logical answer from this statement you made yourself there is nothing I can do for you.

    "I suggest you learn how the stock market works. Why exactly do you believe a FREE product is what is holding their stock back?"

    You are corect on this, it isn’t explorer that is holding their stock back directly. It’s their inability to be innovative in the products that once made them the terror of this industy. Their inability to produce, their inability to deliver. It’s not the cause but the effect and maybe you should examine this a little deeper.

    Or incase this is missing your grasp entirely, look at the xbox fiasco, this explorer shame, the recent deluge of patches and security problem, multi-national govermental problems, google, firefox, linux moving in, and you begin to see a very serious chain of events unfolding here!

    And by the way, no one is amused. Once media darlings, they are churning out unimpressive results. They can sit here and say all they want about being number one, but after continusly fumbling and being unable to make a play someone else will pick up this ball and run with it. And in case you haven’t read the news lately, there are many takers.

    But hey, they always have people like you to speak for them, when they can’t do it themselves.

  151. Anonymous says:

    The impossible delays surrounding

    the release of this browser is yet

    another sign that MS have ‘missed

    the boat’… Even when developers

    are asking them Q’s on their own

    forum they couldn’t be bothered to

    answer!…

    When Google finally take over the

    internet I hope that they will provide

    an option to turn MS off – completely.

    ‘a great change is at hand’ MS, and

    it will effect you more than most…

  152. Anonymous says:

    @Klever– Confirmation dialogs appear to be positioned consistently. You only get one confirmation if you choose to Delete All.

  153. Anonymous says:

    <<

    When Google finally take over the

    internet I hope that they will provide

    an option to turn MS off – completely.

    >>

    It’s going to be a sad day when folks realize that Google is actually just as evil as any other big company. Success breeds contempt.

  154. Anonymous says:

    Serious Sam – sorry, I didn’t mean to point my rant at you with the quote. There are too many others who just come here to say things like "I’m gonna leave if you don’t release IE", "IE is poo boo hoo" blah blah blah.

    @Andrew "we should be concentrating on giving the team concise, constructive, and supportive information from the view of the general user"

    I cannot agree more – the whole point of this blog is to get feedback for IE, so let’s not get it filled with rubbish or the team might not bother any more…

  155. Anonymous says:

    Looks good. I agree with the top comments about making it checkboxes instead of buttons – and remembering their settings (like Opera does).

    Safari also has a nice feature called Private Browsing which means the browser doesn’t keep any cookies, history or anything while private browsing is enabled.

  156. Anonymous says:

    Ruben, that’s cool, sorry for jumping to conclusions with my post, then.

    I also once again have to agree with you: the more rubbish that gets put up here, the less likely it is that the IE team will listen (and yes, before some wise *** comes out with something along the lines of ‘well they don’t listen anyways’, I’d to point out that the very existence of these blogs is strong evidence that they are at least prepared to. At least when it comes to constructive, well thought out feedback, anyways).

  157. Anonymous says:

    "It’s going to be a sad day when folks realize that Google is actually just as evil as any other big company. Success breeds contempt."

    Again missing the point entirely. There are two types of companies. Ones that act and ones that react. I don’t know when the exact point that was for Microsoft’s change but they are definatly the later.

    "we should be concentrating on giving the team concise, constructive, and supportive information from the view of the general user"

    http://www.jcxp.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=4400&st=0&gopid=44787&#

    And what is the general view of this group? GET OUT THE BROWSER! Or someone will do it for you. With all this interest, how long do you think it will be for an unauthorized version of it to pop out for downloading?

  158. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    I’m going to ask some of you to improve the tone of your posts. Insults directed at an individual will get your post deleted. Saying "no offense" doesn’t immunize your post from that fate.

  159. Anonymous says:

    "It’s going to be a sad day when folks

    realize that Google is actually just as

    evil as any other big company. Success

    breeds contempt."

    Interesting point, but I do not think

    anyone here is implying that MS are

    ‘evil’, just imcompetent and (seemingly)

    unaware/unable.

    I am sure that one day the fate that is

    surely awaiting MS, will also happen to

    Google, but MS ARE hailing their new

    browser as some glorious innovation

    which it clearly is not, and I think it

    is in times like this that we can finally

    stop and say "MS, you’ve reached the end

    of the road, pack up and go home. The last

    card you have to play is in the desktop

    market and, ‘though it’s a big play, I

    do not think it will be too long before

    you have some real competition in this

    area".

    And patronising comments, from their staff,

    such as "I’ll let you meditate on the

    information and allow the excitement to

    naturally evolve" illustrate the sad attempt

    at hype, that should not be there, and the

    substance that is very clearly not there.

    Microsoft RIP..

  160. Xepol says:

    First, thanks for breaking up so it is not all or nothing. Frankly I can’t use it if it is all or nothing. I like to keep my passwords and cookies.

    I agree on several points :

    1. CHECK BOXES INSTEAD OF BUTTONS!!!! Heck, I already have buttons scattered all over the interface to do all of the above. Same me time and TRUELY unify the process. oh, and REMEMBER what boxes I checked for next time.

    2. The ability to "not cache the following traffic" would be even more helpful. Sort of like treating normal HTTP pages like HTTPS.

    3. Password management STINKS STINKS STINKS STINKS. Let me decide on a SITE BY SITE basis what passwords I want to keep, never remember whatever.

    I can’t tell you how many times I have accidently clicked "never remember the password for this site" when asked and after that, I was SCREWED. My only choice was to nuke all my passwords. I couldn’t just clear the setting for one site. I want to! I want to get a list of all the sites I have passwords for, and I wanna to change them, I want to delete them, I want to take the sites I’ve marked as never remember the password and change that (either turn it on or off).

    In fact, better micro-management of passwords is about a trillion times more important to me than a screen that lets me delete all my settings in a single glorious click of regret (wait, I **WANTED** my passwords and cookies, just get rid of the rest… damnit. no wait, I NEED those passwords.. augh…)

    Can you do that instead? Or perhaps next?

  161. Anonymous says:

    I’m going to ask some of you to improve the tone of your posts. Insults directed at an individual will get your post deleted. Saying "no offense" doesn’t immunize your post from that fate.

    I will state again. I am not pro-Firefox. In fact I am the quite opposite. I am a Microsoft consumer, stockholder, and a website owner.

    I am passionate about these issues because I have a lot riding in Microsoft. I don’t think anyone here has a direct hatered for MS or that anyone is "out" for another person on this board. But when people are passionate about issues strong discussion is bound to happen. Especially when the company in question releases nothing and discusses nothing in terms of information or answers to direct questions or statements it’s very lifeline exsists upon.

    Answers are needed Microsoft, and not just to me, or not just to anyone on this board, not just to the press, or to developers, but to the individuals that do care, that do buy your products and surf your sites and they are getting nothing from you. So instead they are bypassing you at an alarming rate.

    They didn’t get that xbox they wanted, they bought from google this christmas whose share of the online retailing market inceased phenominally, also 73% of online holiday travelers searched from google. They aren’t getting the security they want from the browser they did trust and there are no other options so they are switching to Firefox. They don’t want to hear anymore about patches of your product that someone else get’s out before you.

    They are not just sitting idly by waiting for you to develop this browser. They are by-passing you all together. And that concerns me not just as a consumer, not just as a stockholder, but as a website owner that has staked my trust in this browser that is giving nothing to me either.

    I am done posting here. I will no longer check here as it is obvious that you don’t want to answer our serious concerns that are happening as we speak. And I am a die-hard fan of MS I am just tired that MS is not a die-hard fan of me.

  162. Anonymous says:

    I find the anti-Microsoft rhetoric here almost unbearable. If Firefox fanboys want to extoll the virtues of Firefox, that’s great, but there are Firefox user groups where you can go and lambast Internet Explorer till the cows come home. In being childish and insulting you are only serving to promote the image that you are either children let loose at the desk unsupervised, or frankly ignorant.

    This Microsoft employee took time out from her work schedule to post a status update on a commonly requested feature that has been added to Internet Explorer. Saying that it’s been ripped off from FireFox is nonsense, the options have been present in Internet Explorer for a long time, all that’s happened here is that they’ve been collated from the various tabs of the options menu and put into a single place (As well as a bit of a tune-up, such as index wiping).

    That said, I find it hard to believe that Firefox users would stand back and scream copycat, when their product of choice simply follows in the footsteps of others, uses the tabbed application paradigm that first arrived with the windows start menu, renders HTML like browsers were doing in the decade or so before it, and so on and so forth.

    Like it or not, theres a team developing IE again now, and IE 7 will do a lot to close the gap between itself and FireFox. Indeed, most of the FireFox selling points will evaporate in the next release, and considering other browsers have had four year period in which to charge ahead, that so little has been done is amazing, when so much has been made of it.

    Criticising IE is all well and good, but having a whine about it when MS wake up and do something about it is laughable.

  163. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    I am the dev manager for the team implementing these changes to the Internet Options dialog (aka InetCPL). I wanted to give some background on why we implemented the Delete Browsing History dialog this way.

    IE6 has a bunch of buttons sprinkled all over InetCPL to clear various types of data; the primary purpose of the new IE7 dialog is to consolidate all those buttons into one place and provide a "Delete All" button. The main user benefit is obvious: no need to poke around InetCPL tyring to find where we hid the button to clear password data, say.

    I get that a lot of the comments here are asking for the checkbox based design. We actually had a quite a series of debates about checkboxes vs. buttons during the spec process of this feature. I agree that using checkboxes, remembering the various settings, adding "and do this whenever I exit the browser" checkbox, and so on would make this a more flexible and more powerful feature. But it would also introduce a new set of interface complexities for our users, and cost significantly more for us to implement.

    We came to the conclusion that the button consolidation approach gave us the most straightforward feature. A user can use one button to clear everything, or he/she can use individual buttons to clear individual data items (plus confirmation dialogs, of course). The implementation cost of this design was also reasonable for the user benefit gained. This is in keeping with our overall goal for the Internet Options dialog in IE7, which is simplification and clarification without radical change.

    I also wanted to add that I think it’s great Uche is so enthusiastic about delivering her first feature at Microsoft. You may agree or disagree that the scope of this feature deserves some of the more grandiose phrasing she used, and that’s OK.

    I welcome more feedback on how this feature works when the public preview comes out, which should be sometime in Q1 2006 (see our post on that at http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/12/06/500599.aspx).

  164. Anonymous says:

    That’s what I was talking about Bruce! Spot on.

    I can see what you mean that checkboxes would’t fit in with the rest of the IE design, as far as consistency goes it makes sense to use the multiple buttons approach (considering there’s no checkboxes in IE at the moment).

    Will there be an alert/prompt when one clicks on "Delete All" for the sake of safety?

  165. Anonymous says:

    Well I use freeware CCleaner to delete all by 1 click, I can exclude cookies in there. Will it be possible to exclude cookies or passwords?

  166. Anonymous says:

    >> But it would also introduce a new set of interface complexities for our users, and cost significantly more for us to implement.

    Can’t you make it possible for power users to enable a set of power options ? In this way you would make the so-wanted options available, without making the basic interface too complex.

  167. Anonymous says:

    Bruce Morgan [MSFT] wrote:

    "… when the public preview comes out, which should be sometime in Q1 2006 (see our post on that at …"

    We saw that post. Then we saw press reports saying Q2. Then you state it "should" be Q1.

    Excuse me if I invoke the "I’m from Missouri" clause.

    Show me!

  168. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    Ron, yes there is a warning for "Delete All". BTW, the dialog shown has a few style guide problems and isn’t final. The ellipses are wrong on some of the buttons, some button sizing isn’t correct, and the text could use some improvement IMHO. But it’s functionally complete.

    TheTom, there won’t be a bunch of individual deletion management features. That’s beyond the scope we wanted for this feature, as is Joost’s request for a "basic" and an "advanced" interface. Again, the primary benefit of this IE7 feature is to consolidate the existing deletion functionality into one dialog.

    Mule, please forgive my choice of the word "should" – we *will* have a public IE7 preview in the first quarter. I understand that my saying that doesn’t mean much. You’ll just have to wait and see.

  169. Anonymous says:

    Yes, like everyone else, I want to see a way of protecting cookies from some sites so that I can delete the rest with a single click. I think this is a must have. (and it should protect favicons too)

    I’d also love to be able to see which site was responsible for the cookie turning up. I don’t always care who the 3rd party ad-site is as long as it came via a reputable source.

    Will we have wildcards and an import list function for the cookie blocker? I’d like that.

  170. Anonymous says:

    Adding this feature to IE is a good choice. Yes, it is similar to Firefox’s implementation but the options have always been there in IE and this is just consolidating them into one area. (I don’t remember the post exclaiming that this is a revolutionary feature) Companies always copy ideas from each other; Firefox is no different than Microsoft in this.

    Many people also seem to be asking Microsoft to release IE7 now lest they lose marketshare. I can just imagine if they did! Those same people would be back on here to complain that Microsoft rushed their product out and how incomplete it is!

    As additional –

    1) It would be nice to see the interface behind each one of the clearing options. Any chance of some further pictures?

    2)The idea of an option to not cachestore historyetc for a specified period is interesting if it could be implemented.

  171. Anonymous says:

    Wow it’s great the IE cache will now be cleared in the background. Waiting for that could always be a pain.

    It’s interesting to note that AOL Explorer has had this feature since the summer…it’s called "Clear My Footprints". It uses checkboxes to mark specific history items and then there is one click access to clear the selected items at any time. Take a look. :)

  172. Anonymous says:

    I’m flabergasted, at Bruce’s comments, that this would be too difficult to make into checkboxes, and that it would cost too much.

    (I’m not sure if cost=time, or cost=money, but regardless)

    &#60;img src&#61;"http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/289/datapurge1pm.png"”>http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/289/datapurge1pm.png" title&#61;"foo"/&#62;

    Link: [http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/289/datapurge1pm.png]

    This concept (ignore that another browser did it first), is MUCH more useful to the end user, and JUST as easy to implement.

  173. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    Kyle, by cost I mean development time. Note that I never said it would be "too difficult".

    The Firefox style checkbox approach is only slightly more expensive than the button approach. The difference is mostly because we would have to rip out the existingconfirm dialogs. Remember, this is based on IE6 code not start-from-scratch code. Had we only wanted that level of functionality, well, then the difference in dev cost is not significant.

    It’s doing more than that is when it starts to become more time consuming than we wanted to invest. Note that I’m talking about comparing implementation A to implementation B, not in an absolute sense. None of this is rocket science.

    BTW, another factor that led us to buttons is that buttons allow us to add richer functionality in future versions without changing the base functionality of the dialog. For example, in IE7 the "Delete Cookies" button results in a mere confirmation dialog, but in some future version it could put up a richer cookie deletion dialog.

  174. Anonymous says:

    @Bruce,

    OMG, I just clued into what’s going on here.

    This isn’t really a new feature, you’ve (MS) just gone in, refactored a bit of code, without changing the called functions, and "moved" the buttons in the GUI. I was, as I think many were, expecting a significant revamp of the entire logic.

    - –

    As for the "future options", the checkbox approach still enables this.

    [Do it] button, calls: [doRequestedTasks()]

    Which does a quick check of the form’s checkbox controls, to see what actions need to run…

    Then, (as applicable), deleteCookies(), deleteCache(), deleteFormData(), delete…() are called…

    For any of the above, each function/method *can* invoke a dialog/confirmation (whatever you desire), and each func/method, *can* be modified any way you want in the future.

    I’m getting the sneaky suspicion, that the various actions taking place here, are "tied" to the buttons onClick(), versus being functions, called by the onClick()…

    Sounds like it’s time for some abstract-ification.

  175. mark stechbart says:

    will IE 7 delete Index.dat files as currently found in Internet Explorer 6?

  176. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    Sometimes it’s valuable and/or necessary to make significant architectural changes to support new features, but in this case it wasn’t necessary nor would it add much value.

    The only significant internal change was to run the "clear history" functionality on a background thread with a progress indicator in a dialog.

    The UI is a combination of new code, refactored code, and existing unmodified code. The underlying existing abstraction layer to delete various types of data is essentially unchanged.

  177. PatriotB says:

    If "checkbox-based" or "tree-based" deletion options are in such demand, as some posters would have you believe, then someone will go off and write an IE extension that does this. It would be quite straightforward for someone to do.

    I agree with Bruce that Microsoft shouldn’t be spending its time on this advanced of a feature. If an advanced feature is in such demand, then someone will write it.

  178. Anonymous says:

    Steve Gray – I completely agree with you – FF related stuff should go on FF forums and IE stuff on IE forums/blogs (i.e. here!)

    Bruce Morgan – It’s great to see a post that clears up a lot of stuff that people here have been debating about – maybe posting it a little earlier may have stopped a few heated exchanges, but better late than never…

    How about we congratulate Uche on her first blog post for MS like Bruce suggested? I hope everybody will agree that she’s done an excellent job. Coming back to your entry full up with some of the comments seen here recently must be disconcerting for any blogger, no? :)

  179. Anonymous says:

    <<will IE 7 delete Index.dat files as currently found in Internet Explorer 6?>>

    The Index.dat file will not be deleted but history information in it will be zero’d out. If you can find data in the file after you run Delete Browsing History, we’d consider this a bug; please let us know.

    We explicitly updated this feature to make sure that the Index.dat data is cleared (unlike in IE6).

  180. Anonymous says:

    This is not new or radical, you’re only playing catch up Uche. Firefox not only has this, they have a much better way as well.

    There is an extension that lets you turn off tracking, you can then do your browsing without history, cache and cookies, after buying the gift you can turn tracking back on to continue normal browsing.

    Why is this turn-off better than a global clear? Using your example of buying your spouse a gift…

    1. After you buy the gift and wipe your tracks all your usefull cookies – the auto-signins, the google preferences, the microsoft passport, the phpBB skins, the internet banking passwords ;) are all gone

    2. After you buy the gift and wipe your tracks your history is blanked. So that work-related site you really have to remember from four days ago is lost.

    3. The very presence of a cleared cache, history and cookies indicates something is going on. A smoking gun to your wife that she will assume means you are looking at porn, not buying her a gift!

    Why not allow tracking to be paused like firefox does – history, cookies to RAM not hard disk (and additionally no existing cookies from HDD), then after the special browse has taken place allow the user to turn the pause off and resume and retain all their work related & important cookies and history.

  181. Anonymous says:

    EricLaw [MSFT]:

    "We show a progress meter while deletion is in progress, and it goes away when it’s done. There will be a "Reset All Defaults" button in IE7– stay tuned for more info."

    Thank you Eric the progess bar will be welcomed.

    However, you didn’t answer my question regarding an IE Repair/Reinstall. How difficult would it be to set up a single button/dialogue window that implements http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=318378:

    1. sfc /scannow

    2. rundll32.exe setupapi,InstallHinfSection DefaultInstall 132 %windir%Infie.inf

    3. Modify register subkey IsInstalled (REG_DWORD):

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftActive SetupInstalled Components{89820200-ECBD-11cf-8B85-00AA005B4383}

    If a user doesn’t wish to ‘[c]omplete an in-place upgrade of Windows XP, a repair of Windows XP, or reinstall Windows XP’ or are not competent enough for a reg edit then their only option is to install an alternate browser.

    Implementing the above command(s) as a GUI component/utility (even with request for OS cd) rather than a command line/reg edit may resolve the issue without using the above kb article. IMO it would be a much greater user friendly solution before a reinstall of the OS.

  182. Anonymous says:

    Nice new feature. A bit late but you finally added it. All the other browsers have thie function and you’ll try to make people think you were the first.

    Anyway why would I want to clear my traces?

    Anyway, I’ll use IE the day when:

    * it’ll have features no other browsers has (i.e. no rip off)

    * it’ll fully support the web standards (instead of Microsoft’s specific HTML specifications) and SVG, XHTML, etc.

    * it’ll not be considered as an operating system mandatory component anynore (because it it NOT supposed to be an operating system component), and that we will be able to FULLY uninstall it.

    And this time isn’t coming, unfortunately. Keep the good job, and maybe you’ll finally make a real browser… maybe.

  183. Anonymous says:

    @TonyH: "However, you didn’t answer my question regarding an IE Repair/Reinstall."

    Sure he did: ‘There will be a "Reset All Defaults" button in IE7– stay tuned for more info.’

  184. Anonymous says:

    @Mark: I’m being optimistic of what "Reset All Defaults" means. My first impression of this was the equivalent of Safari’s "Reset Safari" http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Safari/2.0/en/ibr55.html. However most of those features would be covered in the "Delete All" button of IE7. Therefore doesn’t fulfill my interpretation of a Repair/Reinstall.

    Q318378 includes the reinstallation of software. I certainly hope that "Reset All Defaults" will do the same, even if it requires the OS cd to do so. It has been my experience that drivers, dlls and related files can be corrupted by malware, viruses, hd sector corruption, ect that may not fix the problem from a reinstall from the hard drive. A clean install from the OS cd may be tedious, but should guarantee better results.

    I’ll wait patiently until Eric will reveal "more info." I just want the IE Team to take Q318378 into consideration when implementing this potentially powerful feature.

    On a side note will "Delete Browsing History" and "Reset All Defaults" be back ported to IE6 SP2(+)?

  185. Anonymous says:

    My problem with deleting cookies is that I have a site that required a cookie to remember my account and my computer, otherwise I have to re register again…. so will have to clicks to clean as I do now

  186. Anonymous says:

    I’m sure someone probably already brought this up, but while we’re discussing potential UI improvements in IE7…

    Would it be possible to finally add CSS style switching to IE? I believe it’s the only remaining major browser that doesn’t natively support switching author stylesheets.

  187. Anonymous says:

    To: Eric Law (or any other Microsoft employee who may be bale to help)

    <<The Index.dat file will not be deleted but history information in it will be zero’d out>>.

    This is interesting. What will happen to index.dat’s as they "expire"? For example, at present IE will store data for 20 days by default. Will daily & weekly index.dat files falling otuside of the 20 days also be zero’d?

    Will other information deleted using the "Delete browsing history" also be zero’d, such as cached images, cookies, etc?

    Thank you for any more information that you may be able to provide.

  188. ieblog says:

    Using swear words in your comments will cause them to be deleted.

    – Al Billings [MSFT]

  189. Anonymous says:

    This would be a very useful feature for those who use those public access computers. One click and your history is wiped.

  190. Anonymous says:

    "visted"

    It seems like Microsoft is really getting into the "Vista spirit". :-)

  191. Tjeeze says:

    Will there also be a button, clear my ISP logs?

  192. MSG says:

    Is it possible for websites to appear in the typed urls drop down box of IE if they have not been physically typed in from that computer?

    Ie via malicious code from non reputable websites, downloading video clips or as a result of sharing a wireless network?

  193. Gene says:

    I hope you added the appropriate boxes to Disk Cleanup so one can use the /sageset and /sagerun options of cleanmgr to schedule deletions.

  194. Co to jest &quot;Delete Browsing History&quot;? Najprościej rzecz ujmując jest to funkcja umożliwiająca w bardzo…

  195. IEBlog says:

    Hello, we are Durga and Bala, from the IE IDC team. We would like to describe to you, a new feature in…

  196. Continuing the discussion in the previous post, offcourse index.dat is not a secret record of any kind,…

  197. Since a recent digg article and its underlying Wikipedia entry seems a little confused about index.dat,…

  198. Weddings says:

    First let me introduce myself. My name is Uche Enuha and I am a recent college graduate hire to the Internet Explorer team. I am a Program Manager working on the User Experience team. Now to the main point. There is a new feature in IE7 called ‘Delet

  199. IEBlog says:

    This blog post frames our approach in IE8 for delivering trustworthy browsing. The topic is complicated

  200. 이 글은 Internet Explorer 개발 팀 블로그 (영어)의 번역 문서입니다. 이 글에 포함된 정보는 Internet Explorer 개발 팀 블로그 (영어)가 생성된 시점의