Hello from LA!


I’m here at the Microsoft Professional Developer Conference 2005 in Los Angeles, and I just finished giving my presentation entitled “What’s New in IE7?” to a pretty full house (for a late afternoon session). I’m still pretty pumped up from my talk, but I wanted to share the features we haven’t previously mentioned (and repeat a few we have) for everyone who didn’t make it to the PDC. Expect to see more detail on these features in the near future here on the IEBlog, and of course these features will show up in beta 2.

We’ve continued to develop our new User Experience – in addition to the tabbed browsing, integrated search, shrink-to-fit Web page printing, and redesigned user interface we announced and delivered in beta 1, in my talk today I demoed two new user interface features – first, a Quick Tabs feature, which enables users to view and manage tabs with a live thumbnail view of all tabs in a single window. Secondly, we’ve implemented a Page Zoom feature, which allows users to zoom the text and graphics of web pages with high visual quality, not only to make the web experience more accessible but also to better support high-resolution screens. Finally, in conjunction with A9.com, we’ve also announced OpenSearch 1.1 in order to allow users to easily populate their search engine of choice. We’re working together with A9.com to provide backward compatible extensions to OpenSearch 1.0 to allow the OpenSearch to define search engines that output HTML as well as RSS. These extensions are being provided under the same Creative Commons license we used for the RSS list extensions.

As promised, we are delivering a web subscriptions platform to provide the tools developers need to build innovative RSS-enabled applications, including the Common Feed List (a central repository for all Web Feed Subscriptions), and the Common Data Store (which provides a single store and download mechanism for subscription content). 

We’ve also continued to enhance our security: with a simplified architecture to defend against malware, system-level protection on Windows Vista, and new ways to protect against personal data theft from fraudulent websites, we’ve demonstrated our continued commitment to improving security. Building on the security features released at beta 1, upcoming new features will include ActiveX Opt-in: To reduce the attack surface and give users more control over the security of their PC, most ActiveX controls (even those already installed on the machine) will be disabled by default for users browsing the Internet. Users will have the option to enable controls as needed using the same Information Bar they have used to install new controls since Windows XP SP2, and we are proactively working with the largest ActiveX control vendors to make sure the experience is great. We’ve created a Protected Mode for IE when running on Windows Vista, which reduces the severity of threats to IE and add-ons running in the IE process by eliminating the silent install of malicious code through software vulnerabilities. We do this by automatically running IE in isolation from any other application or process in the operating system and preventing the IE process from writing to any location beyond Temporary Internet Files without explicit user consent. We’ve improved our cross domain barriers to help limit the potential for a malicious Web site to manipulate flaws in other Web sites and cause the user to download undesired content or software. We’ve provided a “One Click Cleanup” feature to clear out the history, cache, etc. (which can be disabled by Group Policy). Finally, we’ve integrated with the Windows Vista Parental Controls to help keep kids safe online by allowing parents to control browsing behavior.

We’ve also continued to add web developer platform features and fixes: we’ve continued to fix CSS and other web standards bugs, but we’ve also rebuilt the <select> element as a windowless control, so it can be visually layered under other elements. IE 7 implements a native XMLHTTPRequest object for Javascript applications, instead of requiring an ActiveXObject to be created. This also means XMLHTTPRequest will function on machines that have ActiveX disabled. We’ve providing support for International Domain Names we’ve also done some thoughtful work to prevent spoofing of URLs by using similar characters from other languages.  

Finally, in recognition of the need for great web developer tools, we are just about to beta a Web Developer Toolbar that provides web developers with rich object model and visual tools which will help them design standards-based HTML and CSS web pages. This feature will be delivered as an add-on for IE6+.

Whew! Sorry for the long run-on post, but I wanted to share the same information we’re presenting at the PDC with everyone.

 – Chris Wilson

Comments (74)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sounds good on the security front, not too excited about the rest. Hopefully they won’t find a way to crack it.

  2. Anonymous says:

    As a web developer, you can’t believe how happy you’re making me with some of this. Note that I’m not at all pleased with the IE team: you guys have managed to piss me off more times that Tom and Pam have broken up and gotten back together (and then some).

    I know it’s a lot to ask, but please, please, please add more things in the standards compliancy arena. Microsoft has to have the resources to bring IE into a decent level of compliancy, so please make IE7 at least comparable to today’s shipping browsers.

    -Chase

  3. Anonymous says:

    Having XMLHttpRequest natively is great, but how about the XSLTTransformer?

    PixelSlave

  4. Anonymous says:

    This sounds great. Keep up the good work. I am finally glad I will be able to put a z-index on the select control.

  5. Anonymous says:

    "Note that I’m not at all pleased with the IE team: you guys have managed to piss me off more times …"

    I really get pissed off by guys like Chase and their "standards" buddies.

    If you are so happy with your Firefoxes, Operas, etc, then keep using them. But stop your terrorist-like tactics of deception.

    Me and the 90 percent plus of Web users are quite happy with the different versions of Internet Explorer. We are also looking forward to have IE 7 in our machines.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Yes, but, Kenneth, ol’ pal, People Like You are the problem, since you effectively fork the Web into pages that are "compatible" with IE (that is, are nonstandard and custom-crafted to work only in IE) and standards-compliant pages. Saying you’re happy with a noncompliant browser is a resounding support of the status quo, one that has been rejected by everyone else… including Microsoft.

    Hope you enjoy your voluntary exile on Noncompliance Island. Send us some coconuts.

  7. Anonymous says:

    I get annoyed by people who refuse to recognize/are oblivious to the fact that the web is a visual experience. Get over yourself and realize that the content of your blog is self-indulgent and pretty much worthless (as is the majority of the content on the web). When the content has no merit, what’s left — the delivery (delivery of content=design).

    IE’s inconsistent CSS handling makes implenting a clever design nearly impossible. Really, it limits the potential of the web, and I don’t like that. So, I’m going to back up Chasen on this one. Please, more CSS support.

    On an aside, I wouldn’t argue that 90% of web users are happy with IE. It is more likely that they are simply unaware of better alternatives. Honestly, how can you say that you’re happy with a browser that only now, in beta, has introduced tabbed browsing? Might I remind you, it’s 2005 already.

  8. krsaborio says:

    Gideon seems to know a bit of Web browsing history …

    I remember Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 5 Macintosh and its Tasman engine delivered long before a stable Mozilla version.

    "Honestly, how can you say that you’re happy with a browser that only now, in beta, has introduced tabbed browsing?"

    You should try to install one of those old AOL browsers made by Microsoft with tabbed browsing. After you do so, then you’ll learn who’s really late with that feature. 🙂

  9. krsaborio says:

    Joe Clark, ol’ pal, have you browsed Yahoo! Groups using the latest version of Opera?

    If you haven’t try this URL http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Costa-Rica-Real-Estate/

    It seems Yahoo! doesn’t care either about Chase and his "standards" buddies.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Chris (and team),

    As a web developer, the above news about IE7 is great. You’ve reported, previously and now, that the most annoying bugs/features of IE (from my pov) have been addressed.

    Thanks for the ongoing updates in the IE blogs, there are very few companies/departments that are as frank about their product as you guys.

    I don’t know if it’s in the project plan, but when IE7 is released, a list of the changes would be very helpful. eg CSS rules (added/deleted/changed), Javascript changes etc.

    Terence Mackie

  11. Kevin Daly says:

    While there’s lots of good news in that post, I find myself filled with childlike wonder and joy (OK I exaggerate slightly, but not much) by the prospect of a native XMLHTTPRequest object, *and* the "select" element (I didn’t want to risk angle brackets) being rewritten as a windowless control.

    Very welcome news indeed.

  12. Anonymous says:

    Seems like you guys are on a role there Chris. Sure there is a lot more on our wishlist, but at least work is underway and you all sound enthousiastic about working on IE7. Can’t wait for beta 2.

  13. Anonymous says:

    @Chris Wilson

    Thanks again for a nice and thoughtful post. Could we get more precisions on the Web Dev toolbar? Or on the new Javascript console that will be integrated in IE7? (please, tell me there will be a useable Javascript console, IE6’s just doesn’t cut it)

    @Chase

    > I know it’s a lot to ask, but please, please, please

    > add more things in the standards compliancy arena.

    > Microsoft has to have the resources to bring IE into

    > a decent level of compliancy, so please make IE7 at

    > least comparable to today’s shipping browsers.

    > -Chase

    Uh, this is pretty stupid seeing the last 10 or so posts on ieblog, added to the WASP comments of meetings between MS teams and them. The IE Team IS implementing standards, big time, in a very nice way. This’ll have to be tested, probably won’t be bug-free "out of the box", but I for one am clearly looking forward to checking IE7b2. They have already fixed many thing, implemented many thing (at least in standard mode), and are still implementing and fixing on just about every front.

    Give them some slack, and stop trying to piss them off when they’re doing whatever they can to please us (because that’s what I see, really: posts saying what they’re doing on a regular basis as we asked for, better standards implementation as we asked for, bug fixings as we asked for, …)

    I’ve already said it, and I’ll say it once more: kudos to the IE team for their work, I right now have much more hope for the future of the Web (and IE7’s ,niceness towards web devs) than I had when the IE7 project first started. By far.

    @Kenneth

    > I remember Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 5 Macintosh

    > and its Tasman engine delivered long before a stable Mozilla version.

    Ah yeah, Tasman. Those were the days, Tasman was praised, was the best engine available at the time, fast, lean, mean, standard-compliant. And then MS dropped the project, and Tantek left for bluer skys, and IE6 was released with less than half IE5/Mac’s goodnesses (yet half the bugs and quirks).

    Had the IE/Mac project kept running, kept being developped and improved at the pace it was at the time, it’d no doubt be the best browser to this day, with *nix and Windows users begging for a port to their platform. But alas it was not, and IE5/Mac is now a bug-ridden crash prone piece of junk that more and more people abandon as their fond memories of it are turning into hatred for it’s specific quirks and bugs.

    > Joe Clark, ol’ pal, have you browsed Yahoo! Groups using the latest version of Opera?

    > If you haven’t try this URL http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Costa-Rica-Real-Estate/

    Is it abnormal that I get strictly the same page in Firefox 1.5b, Opera 8.02 and IE6SP1?

    From your post I guess it is, but yet… what was your point again?

    (heck, with some courage this page is even readable in Lynx)

    > It surely took the open source community a long, long time to release its brainchild browser.

    6 years from "almost nothing" to full fledged stable and pretty standard compliant (albeit not perfect by far) browser.

    And that’s without considering that the Mozilla project went gold (1.0) in 2002, and that the Firefox project itself "only" started in 2002, 3 years ago.

    IE 1.0 was released in August 1995 based on the existing NCSA Mosaic, IE 6.0 was released in 2001…

    @Terence

    > I don’t know if it’s in the project plan, but when IE7 is released,

    > a list of the changes would be very helpful.

    > eg CSS rules (added/deleted/changed), Javascript changes etc.

    Ditto, full changelog would be great.

    @Alberto

    > We should now hope that Firefox and Netscape "fix" it too, although requests for them are always less vocal lol.

    No we don’t, for they don’t have the specific problem that one cannot put anything on top of a select without the select getting back on top whatever you may do

    > It is not a fix, actually: selects have always behaved like that on _all_ browsers.

    You should seriously lay down the crack pipe

    > <form>

    > <select><option>foo</option></select>

    > </form>

    > <div style="position:absolute; top:0; left:0; border:#000000 1px solid; width:300px; height:300px;"></div>

    > Load that in Firefox and you will find the same problem, "unfixed". 🙂

    Works as expected: background is transparent, you can see the select through the div as expected yet can’t manipulated, once again as expected since the select is UNDER the DIV. You don’t expect being able to manipulate a button that’s behind a glass pane even though you can see the button through the glass now do you?

    Put a white background on the div, select disappears once again as expected.

    Now load the initial page in internet explorer, select can be seen through the transparent div as expected, but _select can be manipulated as unexpected_.

    And adding a white background colour confirms that our select is actually sitting *on top* of the div when it’s not supposed to, proving that you have no idea of what you’re talking about.

  14. Anonymous says:

    Native XMLHttpRequest? Nice!

    What about native XML DOM, getters/setters, Document, Node, etc class extensibility (especially for XML DOM)?

  15. Anonymous says:

    Good news, guys. Good job on the features and on recapturing the spirit.

    One thing to consider: there’s currently quite a bit of informal research (a.k.a hacking) going on with trying to find a magic event that allows you to start working with DOM in JS _before_ the content is rendered.

    This is quickly becoming a requirement as markup augmentation and transformation techinques are starting to gain more acceptance.

    There is oncontentready, but you and I both know it doesn’t fire early enough. There’s DOMContentLoaded, but it’s Mozilla-only.

    Maybe an implementation of DOMContentLoaded or making oncontentready explicitly pre-rendering would help?

  16. Anonymous says:

    "…we’ve also rebuilt the <select> element as a windowless control, so it can be visually layered under other elements."

    Bless you!

    "IE 7 implements a native XMLHTTPRequest object for Javascript applications, instead of requiring an ActiveXObject to be created."

    Great to hear. Keep up the excellent work!

  17. Anonymous says:

    This blog doesn’t validate W3C and never will…

    I also hate having to scroll all the way down to post a comment.

  18. Maurits says:

    " Load in firefox

    <form>

    <select><option>foo</option></select>

    </form>

    <div style="position:absolute; top:0; left:0; border:#000000 1px solid; width:300px; height:300px;"></div>

    "

    Well, yeah, that’s what it is supposed to look like. Try clicking on the select in Firefox and you’ll see it doesn’t respond, because it’s behind the <div>. Try in IE and it does respond, incorrectly.

    The default background color of <div>s is transparent, so you can see the select even though its under the <div>.

    Try this though – note the background color:

    <form>

    <select><option>foo</option></select>

    </form>

    <div style="position:absolute; top:0; left:0; border:#000000 1px solid; width:300px; height:300px; background-color: #eee;"></div>

    IE incorrectly shows the <select>, Firefox correctly shows the background of the <div>.

  19. Anonymous says:

    Chris,

    Another great post on the progress of IE7, I’ve been truly shocked every time I read this blog lately. I’m really glad to hear about ActiveX being turned off as default, that makes a LOT of sense.

    All of the CSS bug-fixes are great to hear about, as is the addition of a native XMLHttpRequest object. I’m very happy to see the root node being killed and proper pseudo-elements added. One thing that still concerns me (I haven’t seen any confirmation from you guys) is the xml prologue, does/will it still throw IE7 into quirks mode? Of course we can work around little things like this, but it would be nice if we didn’t have to 🙂

    The web developer toolbar is interesting, I’m on a Mac and I use Safari most of the time, but I switch to Firefox from time to time to use it’s developer toolbar which is fantastic.

    Again, great news for us web developers. I hope you guys are enjoying the work on IE. You guys will rightly get a lot of praise if IE7 doesn’t suck.

    Cheers;

    Poncho

  20. Anonymous says:

    > This blog doesn’t validate W3C and never will…

    > I also hate having to scroll all the way down to post a comment.

    Well, this blog is unfortunately running on CommunityServer which is one of the truest piles of donkey poo ever witnessed (check what the HTML it spewed looks like).

    And yet, this version is fairly clean (1.2?), go check http://www.thedailywtf.com to witness what CommunityServer can *really* bring to you (pain, suffering, and using POST vars to keep track on pages on a forum…)

  21. Anonymous says:

    All this debate about standards and CSS is fine and dandy, but I am curious, from a graphics standpoint, when will IE support PNG natively? PNG is far superior to GIF when it comes to complex web design as it supports alpha channels and compresses better than GIF. Please let us know when we can finally use this wonderful format that has been around for years.

  22. Anonymous says:

    Please, tell us more about this "Parental Control".

  23. Anonymous says:

    @Teressa

    > when will IE support PNG natively? PNG is far superior to

    > GIF when it comes to complex web design as it supports

    > alpha channels and compresses better than GIF. Please

    > let us know when we can finally use this wonderful format that has been around for years.

    IE6 does support PNG already, albeit not alpha and gamma channels, and had you read this blog you’d have seen that IE7 does support PNG’s alpha channels. This has been blogged multiple times by the IE team.

  24. Anonymous says:

    Fantastic news. Congratulations on all the good work.

    Will the newly rebuilt select element have support for option groups?

  25. Anonymous says:

    Will the new <select> include rebuilt <optgroup>s and <option>s as well?

    Will the <select>s support styles like overflow?

    Will the <optgroup>/<option>s support styles like margin, padding, borders, text-align, overflow, background and so on?

  26. Anonymous says:

    This is excellent Chris. Thanks for the update. All the updates you’ve posted in the last few months have been very encouraging.

  27. search-engines-web says:

    —– which allows users to zoom the text and graphics of web pages with high visual quality,—-

    How is this(graphics zoom) being accomplished – through "INTERPOLATION" of the image? from the 72 (96) (DPI default)

    Severak feature suggestions:

    (this has been on Netscape for Years)

    * * * "View Frame in New Window" * * * feature

    Now, the only options available are to press CNTRL-D to save frame to Favorites or right-click and copy the URL in the Properties.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Another feature would really like to see – is the ability to STOP a "frozen" page with JavaScript pop-ups from attempting to load when it is freezing. (this is different from Pop-up blocking) perhaps a keyboard combination

    could be introduced

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Please don’t forget to create, and add more Transitions and Style Filters – am using them alot to replace Graphics because they are So-o fast loading and "vectorized"

  28. Anonymous says:

    For lack of a better term: thanks.

    Getting up to the same level of CSS compliance as the other browsers is pretty much the last piece of the puzzle here to make me no longer hate IE. Native xmlhttprequest, fixing select elements, and a decent web developer toolbar would make my day.

    Oh, and us "standards buddies" includes pretty much every single web developer and company on the planet that matters. Here’s a short list of companies contributing to the w3c standards bodies:

    Microsoft

    Yahoo

    Google

    Amazon

    Should I go on? Don’t be daft. Web standards are good. Microsoft acknowledges them as being critical. They just happen to have some rather …interesting…legacy issues that have to be addressed. It’s idiotic to argue against the standards, and reeks of a person who simply doesn’t "get it". You, sir, are the inept developer. IE has some MAJOR bugs (that MICROSOFT ACKNOWLEDGES) that make development HARDER THAN IT NEEDS TO BE. You can’t develop pages that only work in IE (you’d lose about 10-15% of your customer base), and you can’t develop pages that only work in browsers that are "mostly" compliant (no browser is 100%) (you’d lose about 85-90% of your customer base). IE fixing the CSS bugs and implementing the CSS features that other browsers already do does nothing but make the internet better, and you, sir, are an idiot for attacking people who say this is a critical thing to do.

    Standardized rendering makes the "browser wars" become a battle of features (tabbed browsing, split window support, etc.), not a frustration for developers. And that, my friend, is a good thing for everyone — even people who don’t use IE.

    IE Team:

    Now, could you pretty, pretty, pretty please implement a more modular rendering engine (i.e. one that can be patched WITHOUT a full system upgrade?). That way when CSS3 is finalized, you can just update it with an automatic update.

  29. ieblog says:

    Guys, personal attacks will get your commetns deleted. Please knock it off or take it elsewhere.

  30. Anonymous says:

    Please don’t feed the trolls.

  31. Anonymous says:

    Select element as a windowless control? Wow!!!

    XMLHTTPRequest object independent of ActiveX? Wow!!!

    If you want me to go to nirvana, then how about useful error messages? Now, when a problem occurs, you get an MSIE error dialog that has cryptic and irrelevant information. It references line numbers that map to areas totally unrelated to the cause of the problem.

  32. Anonymous says:

    Hi IE Team,

    are smart client developer second class citizen? why don’t you post any information for smart client developer ?

    As you know, the Webbrowser class in Whidbey seems to be a very bad wrapper for the com webbrowser control.

    Are there any usefull information to use IE7 as a control for smart client developement ?

  33. Anonymous says:

    > How easy is for inept people to blame others for their own faults.

    Yeah, you already said that, but repeating it won’t make it true you know.

  34. krsaborio says:

    "… having to hack for IE due to it’s flaky standards support is escalating the cost of projects …"

    How easy is for inept people to blame others for their own faults.

  35. Anonymous says:

    @Kenneth Saborio

    If you haven’t done enough web development to realise that having to hack for IE due to it’s flaky standards support is escalating the cost of projects, then you probably needn’t be commenting here on this blog.

    Your last comment about inept developers was close to idiotic.

  36. aeberhar says:

    "…we’ve also rebuilt the <select> element as a windowless control…"

    Now I know I’ve died and gone to heaven. It’s the little things that make all the difference. Thanks!

  37. krsaborio says:

    "Over the years IE has cost both me and my customers considerable sums …"

    The real issue is some incompetent developers should be fired for wasting customers’ moneys and for providing non-professional services.

    Worst of all are the terrorist-like tactics of deception [lies] always blaming others for their own mistakes.

  38. Anonymous says:

    "Over the years IE has cost both me and my customers considerable sums in time and money developing clean, standards based sites and apps, then hacking them to work in IE."

    Lies, lies and more lies.

    How easy is for inept people to blame others for their own faults.

    I’m sorry to tell you the truth, but you’re just an inept developer.

  39. Anonymous says:

    The IEBlog lays out some of the new features we can expect with Internet Explorer 7 Beta 2. It looks like the beta releases aren&amp;rsquo;t just bug fixes but a whole slew of new features. Thanks to Firefox for waking…

  40. Anonymous says:

    Over the years IE has cost both me and my customers considerable sums in time and money developing clean, standards based sites and apps, then hacking them to work in IE. Anyone who has had to debug javascript in IE knows it can be a dog to work with.

    I am very pleased to see Microsoft and the IE team making what seems (even to a MS skeptic like me) an honest commitment to making IE a solid and enjoyable platform to develop on. I understand it must be hard to fix some of the mistakes of the past while still maintaining backwards compatibility.

    It seems MS have finally remembered it’s all about "developers, developers, developers".

    Keep up the good work guys.

  41. Anonymous says:

    It’s great news that the SELECT element will be a windowless control at last. Having to hide them manually whenever I had some other element positioned above them was an awful pain. I hope that similarly OPTGROUP will be supported too. Erik above expressed my sentiments regarding XMLHTTPRequest, document.implementation.createDocument(), and company better than I could.

    However, I’ve one tiny question: will IE7 implement the BUTTON element <em>correctly</em>. This is something that I’ve wanted for my work for quite a while, but have had to avoid it in lieu of a combination of scripting and the INPUT element, or implementing forms in a less than preferable manner for the mean time. The markup below demonstrates the problem:

    <form method="get" action="./test.html">

    <button type="submit" name="action" value="go">Foo</button>

    <button type="submit" name="action" value="stop">Bar</button>

    </form>

    When the button marked "Foo" is clicked, "test.html?action=go" should be fetched, and when the button marked "Bar" is clicked, "test.html?action=stop" should be fetched. However, IE currently fetches "test.html?action=go&action=stop" when either button is clicked. This is more than a little unfortunate.

  42. Anonymous says:

    > Does Internet Explorer support displaying of pages that are sent as application/xhtml+xml yet?

    It has been stated that it won’t, the IE devs have quite a lot of work in front of them before reaching the point of implementing application/xhtml+xml (the first one being the implementation of correct MIME types handlings and actually useable Accept headers).

    And even if they did implement it, you’d still have to – at best – use content negociation for IE6/W2k.

    With the IE7 codebase being worked on, they can just implement xhtml+xml when they reach that point and push it forward as a mere IE7 update, rapidly reaching 90 to 95% of the (future) installed IE7 user base.

  43. Anonymous says:

    Alberto missed a huge point…

    Invalid code is left to be rendered by EACH rendering engine as it pleases. By not following standards a website will not correctly render across various browsers. If your code is crap then Firefox will correctly render the page as crap.

    Funny that IE would bother to render invalid markup in a method that would make it appear valid. Try incorrectly programming in C or Java and expect your program to run the way you expect it.

    While it is to a limited extent applaudable that IE is able to take crap and render it in a way we’d all prefer this is in the absence of corrrectly rendering valid markup…

    So instead of badmouthing good practices by professionals who KNOW what they’re doing and using BAD examples of markup how about cheering on the MSIE team for cleaning up and updating IE for goodness sakes?

  44. Anonymous says:

    Skipping the CSS rant I love the feature of only being able to write to the Temp Internet Files, this seems like a great idea!

  45. Anonymous says:

    Does Internet Explorer support displaying of pages that are sent as application/xhtml+xml yet?

  46. Anonymous says:

    It would be cool to have the ‘Web Developer Toolbar’ for IE.

    When can we expect to see it … ?

  47. Anonymous says:

    &amp;#8222;Лошите&amp;#8220; Micro$oft все пак са решили да хвърлят нящолко трохи на уморените от проблеми уеб дизайнери. IE 7 ще съдържа и следните промени:

    Е

  48. NickFitz says:

    CSS improvements, windowless Select, non-ActiveX XmlHttpRequest: all wonderful news for web developers everywhere 🙂

    @Alberto: I see no "windowed control" problem in Firefox using markup which demonstrates the bug/issue in IE. Selects have _not_ always behaved like that on all browsers.

  49. Anonymous says:

    Fantastic news about removing the reliance on ActiveX for the XMLHTTPRequest object! I keep having to pinch myself every time I read this blog lately. 😉

  50. Anonymous says:

    [Excellent. The select element has been a problem for us when creating dynamic forms. Thanks for fixing it. ]

    I am with you but please allow me to specify one thing may I?

    We should now hope that Firefox and Netscape "fix" it too, although requests for them are always less vocal lol.

    It is not a fix, actually: selects have always behaved like that on _all_ browsers. It is a Microsoft IE7 cool ADDITION & feature, and a very useful one. And, maybe, even one out of the standards, if the standard givers are Firefox & co’s implementations.

    <form>

    <select><option>foo</option></select>

    </form>

    <div style="position:absolute; top:0; left:0; border:#000000 1px solid; width:300px; height:300px;"></div>

    Load that in Firefox and you will find the same problem, "unfixed". 🙂

  51. Anonymous says:

    *All* of this look really good!

  52. Anonymous says:

    Excellent. The select element has been a problem for us when creating dynamic forms. Thanks for fixing it.

  53. Anonymous says:

    [Hopefully they won’t find a way to crack it.]

    Of course they will find it. It is not a limitation of IE, it is just that, if you try long enough, at the end you may also crack Fort Knox.

    It is the expectation that there should exist something un-crackable, and that such a thing is supposed to have to be IE, that has to be adandoned as bugged.

    [I really get pissed off by guys like Chase and their "standards" buddies.]

    I wrote an entire 120Kb files (click nickname) with all the assumptions these guys make. You are right to be annoyed. I also listed validation links over 200 web pages that do not validate in the least. Stuff from CNN to Wroxx, from Logitech to Newsweek, from Yahoo to LookSmart, from Google to the UN.

    Microsoft and Mozilla validate.

    Yet, not even the W3C always validates. I just found and published an official W3C contact website that does not validate and yields 53 errors.

    Jackob Nielsen does not validate.

    Political websites of all hues, from nologo org till the republican party until parties of other countries, none validates.

    And if by sorcery they would all be made valid tomorrow, nothing would erase the historical fact that till this very same day scores of millions of surfers have been using daily and smoothly websites not valid -under the range of the hundreds of validation errors each- from Amazon till Netscape. And nothing happened as a consequence of missing validation.

    It is not only that validation is a false goal. It is that it is being used, de facto, like a gridlock in order to fight a market share battle. Websites that validate and respect the standards can be counted on two hands and you won’t use all your fingers even supposing you miss a couple. Yet the argument is used electively and selectively against Microsoft ONLY.

    [IE’s inconsistent CSS handling makes implenting a clever design nearly impossible. Really, it limits the potential of the web]

    Strip off that "really" and the rest might go lol.

    [progress they’re making has been fantastic. Sure, it’s not perfect – but it’s a huge step.]

    Neither the blogs of css fanatics are perfect. All they know is css, as it is not, but as they feel it should be, and yet as it is on no website that matters – again from the Vatican to Altavista, from McGraw-Hill to Tucows, from Epson to Greenpeace, from Ebay to Oracle, from Apache org to Napster.

    True, also those sites are not perfect since they do not validate. And this is why they all prosper and we all go on using them day by day reserving this immaterial concern for Microsoft ONLY.

  54. Anonymous says:

    Really good news regarding the select element.

    I’m also very happy that you listened to feedback and realized that XMLHttpRequest without ActiveX is a requirement today.

    However I think it is important to know that you also plan to implement document.implementation.createDocument or we will still require MSXML for a lot of things. I’m also wondering whether this is a wrapping on top of MSXML so that XPath still works and so on. The following objects go hand in hand and are usually implemented in IE6 using the MSXML ActiveX: XMLHttpRequest, DOMParser, XMLSerializer, XSLTProcessor, document.implementation.createDocument and document.evaluate (DOM level 3 XPath). If these are not available to scripting with ActiveX then the work with XMLHttpRequest has been mostly in vain.

  55. Anonymous says:

    Ein Eintrag in dem IEBlog hat soben meinen Tag vers&#252;&#223;t. Nein, nicht die neuen Sicherheitsfeatures, wie z.B. der zweifelhafte Test auf Pishing-Seiten.Selectboxen&#160;werden jetzt als &amp;quot;windowless controls&amp;quot;&#160;gerendert, k&#246;nnen also nun endlich auch von E

  56. krsaborio says:

    In July 2003, AOL got really pissed off of the waiting for a stable Mozilla-Phoenix-Firebird-Firefox browser:

    http://news.com.com/2100-1032_3-1026078.html

    In December 2003, AOL got even more pissed off at Mozilla-Phoenix-Firebird-Firefox:

    http://news.com.com/2100-1038-5117897.html

    The open source community should have licensed the Tasman engine from Microsoft in 2000 🙂

  57. Anonymous says:

    Kenneth, what is your problem? Stop being such a fanboy.

    I welcome all improvements to the next IE, they are all necessary. Especially select obeying z-index makes some of my progress bars happier. Security improvements are of course important too.

    100% CSS support should be the goal for the team, I mean if it hurts now, what about next time when you have to catch up again…

  58. krsaborio says:

    "Yes, FireFox is a fantastic example of a Browser, and the brainchild of the open source community."

    It surely took the open source community a long, long time to release its brainchild browser.

    First, there was Mozilla.

    Then, the name and design switched to Phoenix. Then to Firebird.

    And lastly, to Firefox.

    980223 Netscape Announces mozilla.org

    981207 Netscape Delivers "Gecko" Browsing Engine.

    990319 Mozilla Milestone 3

    990401 Netscape Celebrates First Anniversary of Open Source Software.

    990415 Mozilla Milestone 4

    990505 Mozilla Milestone 5

    990529 Mozilla Milestone 6

    990622 Mozilla Milestone 7

    990716 Mozilla Milestone 8

    990726 Mozilla Milestone 8.5

    Note: Last Pre-Necko Builds (aka 8.5)

    990826 Mozilla Milestone 9

    991008 Mozilla Milestone 10

    991116   Mozilla Milestone 11

    991221 Mozilla Milestone 12

    000126 Mozilla Milestone 13

    000301 Mozilla Milestone 14

    000418 Mozilla Milestone 15

    000613 Mozilla Milestone 16

    000807 Mozilla Milestone 17

    001012 Mozilla Milestone 18

    001206 Mozilla 0.6

    010109 Mozilla 0.7

    010214 Mozilla 0.8

    010326 Mozilla 0.8.1

    010507 Mozilla 0.9

    010607 Mozilla 0.9.1

    010628 Mozilla 0.9.2

    010802 Mozilla 0.9.3

    010808 Mozilla 0.9.2.1

    010914   Mozilla 0.9.4

    011012 Mozilla 0.9.5

    011031 Mozilla 0.9.4.1

    011120 Mozilla 0.9.6

    011221 Mozilla 0.9.7

    020204 Mozilla 0.9.8

    020311 Mozilla 0.9.9

    020418   Mozilla 1.0 Release Candidate 1

    020510 Mozilla 1.0 Release Candidate 2

    020523 Mozilla 1.0 Release Candidate 3

    020605 Mozilla 1.0

    020924 Mozilla releases Phoenix 0.1

    030414 Mozilla Phoenix Renamed Firebird

    040209 Mozilla Firebird Renamed Firefox

    041109 Firefox 1.0

    Six years in the making … [ and counting 🙂 ]

  59. Anonymous says:

    Chris,

    Thanks for the update! Things are starting to sound really good now, can’t wait to test the next beta.

    I raise one interesting question about fontsize and pixels in my reaction to this post, in <a href="http://www.robertnyman.com/2005/09/14/some-ie-7-news/">Some IE 7 news</a>.

    I’d be happy if you have the time to reply to that.

  60. Anonymous says:

    "Microsoft has to have the resources to bring IE into a decent level of compliancy."

    Considering the short amount of time the team clearly have, what ‘level of compliance’ would you like to see?

    And don’t go on some open source rant. Yes, FireFox is a fantastic example of a Browser, and the brainchild of the open source community. But Microsoft is a business, with deadlines and targets. I personally think the progress they’re making has been fantastic. Sure, it’s not perfect – but it’s a huge step.

  61. Anonymous says:

    Wow! Great News! I haven’t read such great news from Microsoft untill I switched to Linux! I think MS wants me back on Windows. LOL. It’s ok, I’ll still need to use Windows sometimes, especially since I’m a web designer, and I have to test stuff in IE. Good to hear though, keep it up.

  62. Anonymous says:

    The VB guys have it working in vb 9 as part of xlinq. I hope jscript gets it soon. There were 3 MS folks on the ECMAScript somittee. It’s in Gecko 1.8 now.

  63. Anonymous says:

    &lt;p&gt;Un interesante movimiento (menor, pero interesante) de Microsoft con respecto a su futuro Internet Explorer 7. Se trata del soporte de OpenSearch 1.1 en el navegador lo que permitir&#225; que elegir cualquier buscador que cumpla este est&#225;ndar como el usad

  64. Anonymous says:

    A couple of things.

    First:

    Are there any plans to support JPEG2000 and/or SVG in Internet Explorer?

    Support for JPEG2000 isn’t super important–the original JPEG is just fine–but it would be nice.

    SVG seems somewhat more important to me since it is the open equivilant to a widely used, closed format: Flash.

    Second:

    I’m not sure if this has been asked before, but how frequently will IE be updated after the release of version 7? Will IE get frequent (say… every six months to a year) updates to bring it up to speed with new versions of W3 specs when they get officially recommended?

    The update cycle of IE–and what gets updated–is a huge deal breaker for me. I don’t really care to switch to a browser that will just fall behind again a year later and stay that way for another 1-4 years.

  65. Anonymous says:

    You obviously have never tried to develop a complex design for a webpage with CSS. I don’t even care about what browser is standards compliant. I’m just not going to use CSS ChildHacks (I used to use them all the time) to help MSIE try and read my webpage.

    I’ve moved my website off of the text/html MIME type to application/xhtml+xml and MSIE (for Windows atleast) can’t read my site and tries to download it due to its lack of support for standards.

    Without standards there isn’t even plain text on the web, try to make a good argument next time. Don’t just say, "How easy is for inept people to blame others for their own faults." explain why it is their faults. Thanks.

    -Alex, Middle School Student and Amateur Webdeveloper

  66. Anonymous says:

    Dear Chris,

    where can I read some detailed pieces of information about the IDN-implementation (e.g. spoofing prevention)?

    Greets Jean

  67. Anonymous says:

    I don’t have interest to test IE beta, as critical component such as the web browser should always be rock solid. Anyhow I’d like to submit this feedback regarding daily IE6 chores.

    "We’ve continued to develop our new User Experience"

    Does this include the removal of the file copying dialog you get after downloading a gigabyte video from Channel 9 and waiting few minutes for it to move from the temp folder to the destination folder on the same drive? (it shouldn’t be taking longer to move the file from temp folder than to download it over gigabit link)

    I guess all of IE team must be using RAM temp drives!