Blog Business Summit (aka Shameless plug for Scoble)


The information published in this post is now out-of-date and one or more links are invalid.

—IEBlog Editor, 21 August 2012

Robert Scoble and I are going to give a keynote together at the Blog Business Summit on August 19 in San Francisco. Why? We think that RSS is becoming a critical tool for businesses to communicate with customers and we want that to happen even faster.

Robert will talk about how businesses can use RSS to create strong, ongoing connections with their customers. I’ll talk about how the RSS platform in Windows Vista will make tapping into the power of RSS easier, as well as some of the new opportunities that businesses and bloggers can expect.

Because Microsoft is the exclusive Diamond Level sponsor for this event, I’m happy to offer a discount to IE Blog readers. Just register at http://www.blogbusinesssummit.com/register_microsoft.htm. We’ll also host the Microsoft Blog Business Summit Reception on August 18, with people from our team available to listen to feedback and answer questions about IE and RSS.

– Dean

Comments (33)

  1. Anonymous says:

    I’ve got a concern – aren’t you destroying RSS? You’re just beginning to support this technology and already proposed extensions, without first getting experience in this area.

    This already has happened with HTML and CSS. Isn’t the case that RSS created by Longhorn is going to be compatible (or working smoothly) only with Microsoft tools?

    I’m sick of "This page is optimized for Internet Explorer". I wouldn’t like to see "This RSS is optimized for (whatever Microsoft is going to release)" next.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Speaking of keynotes, I have also noticed that Tony Chor is listed to speak in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia in September at the HITBSecConf2005 conference:

    http://conference.hackinthebox.org/hitbsecconf2005kl/index.php?cat=1

    What will the topic be on and are any other members of the IE Team going over for that event? Will there be some IE 7 demos? I’m going over from HK so the flight isn’t too long for me.

    Any chance of IE Blog readers getting a discount for this conf? Microsoft is listed as one of the sponsors… 😀

    Adrian McCormick

  3. Anonymous says:

    Speaking of keynotes, I have also noticed that Tony Chor is listed to speak in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia in September at the HITBSecConf2005 conference:

    http://conference.hackinthebox.org/hitbsecconf2005kl/index.php?cat=1

    What will the topic be on and are any other members of the IE Team going over for that event? Will there be some IE 7 demos? I’m going over from HK so the flight isn’t too long for me.

    Any chance of IE Blog readers getting a discount for this conf? Microsoft is listed as one of the sponsors… 😀

    Adrian McCormick

  4. Anonymous says:

    kL: MS did not destroy HTML or CSS; they simply lost intrest and now have to play catch-up because the world has changed. By doing that they have merely obstructed innovations at that point, but they certainly did not destroy it.

    I do share your point of concern though; I am afraid that once MS has flooded the world with their implementation of RSS (and sufficiently protected it with patents) at a point they will lose intrest again and all innovativeness will come to a grinding halt just because MS will think it is ‘good enough’ for the customer.

    But then again RSS is just a [i]simple[/i] syndication, so why is MS making such a big deal out of it? In my opinion they’re making good show of something all competitors already have…

  5. Anonymous says:

    Microsoft have not destroyed RSS. Their extensions are 100% standard, anyone (not just MS tools) can read them, and if you remember, they consulted the RSS create Dave Winer himself about creating these extensions.

    Stop whining. MS are doing good things.

  6. Anonymous says:

    "But then again RSS is just a /simple/ syndication, so why is MS making such a big deal out of it?"

    Because Atom, doesn’t have the name ‘Microsoft’ in it. Mike Weller is right though, the extensions are pretty much standard as anything RSS is.

    I have a question. Will ie7 support Atom? That would be pretty cool, plus it’s quite similar to Microsofts RSS support so it shouldn’t be very difficult.

  7. Anonymous says:

    "But then again RSS is just a /simple/ syndication, so why is MS making such a big deal out of it?"

    Because Atom, doesn’t have the name ‘Microsoft’ in it. Mike Weller is right though, the extensions are pretty much standard as anything RSS is.

    I have a question. Will ie7 support Atom? That would be pretty cool, plus it’s quite similar to Microsofts RSS support so it shouldn’t be very difficult.

  8. Anonymous says:

    > Stop whining. MS are doing good things.

    Yes, after everyone else got there first. Nice to see MS "innovating" again…

  9. Anonymous says:

    Alan, I believe there was a different post somewhere which mentioned that wherever they’ve implemented RSS and Atom support in all the same places. It might have been that unbelievably long video.

  10. Anonymous says:

    @Ian Kirker: I’ve also noticed some news sites reporting that Microsoft will support both Atom and RSS (both of various versions) in Vista, but I haven’t found a reliable source on this subject. Could the IE team confirm/deny this?

    Thank you.

  11. Anonymous says:

    These issues are going to come up at the conference. During the last one, a whole other event of discussions was going on in the halls and during the breaks. As a member of the Web Standards Projects, I’ll have my own questions about implementation. I hope you’re planning on coming and to meet you commenters there.

  12. Anonymous says:

    When are we going to see this IE7 beta? Vista Beta is coming 8/3 so can we expect IE7 at the samem time?

  13. Anonymous says:

    Not sure why it hasn’t been blogged here yet but yes, IE7 is supposed to be released on Aug 3 (http://www.internetnews.com/dev-news/article.php/3522461) …

    As that last link included, Longhorn will support both RSS and Atom. From what I understand, the extensions Microsoft was making to RSS was to bring up the level of functionality to equal that of Atom. Thereby allowing either format to be used interchangably within the OS (users shouldn’t have to care which format they use).

  14. Anonymous says:

    Internet Explorer is a waste of time. Firefox is a much better, safer browser and Internet Explorer will not be able to match or achive better than it.

  15. Anonymous says:

    I have a sinking feeling that the silence on the topic of css standards and such are an indication that they have ignored. Is it just me?

    Terry

  16. Anonymous says:

    Yes, Yes RSS is good and interesting. . . And it’ll be everywhere in Microsoft now, but what about a simple release date for IE 7 beta?????

    Frustrated,

    KNIGHT RIDER

  17. Anonymous says:

    [sarcasm] Aah, how refreshing it is that we can have one thread on the *IE* blog that doesn’t insult IE and praise Firefox. How refreshing it is we can have one thread that can stay on topic for more than 5 replies without coming back to "standards". [/sarcasm]

    Anyone else happen to be getting annoyed with this? I’m beginning to get to the point I think the IE team should delete every single comment on either of the subjects, cause not a single thread is readable and able to stay on topic because fanboys have nothing better to do than to flood every subject on the blog, rather than actually letting people *gasp* chat about the topic in the subject line.

  18. Anonymous says:

    "Anyone else happen to be getting annoyed with this? I’m beginning to get to the point I think the IE team should delete every single comment on either of the subjects, cause not a single thread is readable and able to stay on topic because fanboys have nothing better to do than to flood every subject on the blog, rather than actually letting people *gasp* chat about the topic in the subject line. "

    Why don’t they just address our concerns and get it over with? If it’s not what we want to hear then it’s not what we want to hear. No amount of complaining will be able to change that. But, if it is, then everybody wins, right?

  19. Anonymous says:

    Tyler,

    Way back in February, Dean posted the following:

    """

    I wanted to recap the main themes I read in the comments and use them as a roadmap for the topics that we will post about over the next few weeks.

    1. What have you guys been doing since IE6?

    2. What makes IE7 on Win2K so hard anyway?

    3. Standards, standards, standards… say something!

    """

    Since then, apart from the content-free fluff of this entry:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/03/09/391362.aspx

    …I don’t think we’ve heard a single thing about "standards, standards, standards". And yet, for a great many people, it’s the most important issue – far more so than photos of the developers or plugs for Scoble. Unsurprisingly, comments are made in unrelated entries because there are no related entries to make comments in.

    I’m sure if the IE team actually made an entry or two concerning "standards, standards, standards", people wouldn’t be quite so keen to pollute the other topics here. By avoiding the subject, the IE team is exacerbating the situation.

  20. Anonymous says:

    @Fuzztrek:

    * The IE team has already said (many times) that they won’t discuss features before they are implemented, and more generally that there are strict limitations to what they can say about future releases.

    * They have said that they are aware of the requests about web standards and that they are working on it, but that some prioritization would help.

    So, it seems rather likely that they are currently working hard on CSS improvements, that it’s a big task, and that they don’t have anything new to say about it for now. It’s quite possible that some of their work requires lots of testing, or even extensive changes in the rendering engine. Maybe a lot of it will not give results before the final release of IE7, or even later ones.

    If you need more reassurance that they are working on it, read

    http://www.webstandards.org/buzz/archive/2005_07.html#a000539

    In the meantime, lots of readers are getting really fed up with repetitive and off-topic comments, and nagging does not help the IE developpers to improve their browser.

  21. Anonymous says:

    Jim: my apologies that you found my first post to be "content-free fluff". Perhaps my SECOND post on the topic – http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/04/22/410963.aspx – which had more details on what we’d actually done at the time – would be more to your liking. As for why I haven’t been saying more, I’ll refer you to Lionel’s excellent response above.

  22. Anonymous says:

    Note: Corrections welcome

    IE5: Win3.11, Win95, Win98, WinME, WinNT, Win2k, Mac OS 9, Mac OS X, HP-UX, Solaris.

    IE6: Win98, WinME, WinNT, Win2K, WinXP.

    IE7: WinXP, Longhorn(?)

    This shows quite well that Microsoft is entirely capable of releasing a browser for completely different OSes. All claims of Win2K being "not good enough" for IE7 are 99% pure marketing. Just say "we want you to pay a couple hundred bucks for NT 5.1 point release" and be done with it.