Longhorn loves RSS!


The information published in this post is now out-of-date and one or more links are invalid.

—IEBlog Editor, 12 September 2012

Earlier today, I went to downtown Seattle to Gnomedex 5.0, and stood up in front of 300 tech influentials, enthusiasts and leaders to talk about some really exciting things that we’ve been working on for the past several months.

The main thing I talked about is the deep platform support for RSS that we’re building into the next version of Windows codenamed “Windows Longhorn.” 

We think that the RSS functionality in Longhorn will make it easy for users to discover, view and subscribe to RSS feeds, as well as make it simple for developers to incorporate the rich capabilities of RSS into their applications.  

We’re integrating RSS features throughout Longhorn to enable a broader group of users and developers to more easily take advantage of RSS.  For instance, while browsing the web, you’ll be able to easily discover RSS feeds through an illuminated icon, as well as read the feed while still in IE. Once you find a feed you’re interested in, you’ll be able to subscribe to an RSS feed as easily as adding a favorite.

The RSS features in the Windows Longhorn platform will also enable application developers to easily build RSS support into their applications. 

For example, a business user about to attend a conference could subscribe to the conference’s event calendar. He can then use a Longhorn RSS-enabled calendar application to view the events in the RSS feed from within his calendar app. Or an IT worker can subscribe to sales data that notifies them via a line-of-business application when new deals have been closed.

Amar Gandhi (Group Program Manager for the Longhorn RSS platform) and I showed a few great demos of how application developers can integrate with the platform. We did the same demos for a Channel 9 video which you can see at https://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=80533.

But that’s not all. :)

I also announced some enhancements to RSS, which we call the Simple List Extensions. The Simple List Extensions can be used to enable websites to publish lists such as photo albums, music playlists and Top 10 lists as RSS feeds. RSS can be used to publish lists like these today, but our extensions really enhance the experience that users can have when subscribing to these kinds of lists. We’re very excited about the great scenarios that these extensions can enable.  

One scenario I’m particularly excited about is the idea of being able to subscribe to my wife’s Amazon.com wish-list – we’ve been talking to the great folks at Amazon.com about using these extensions, and, at Gnomedex, Amar and I showed a prototype application working live against Amazon.com wish lists built using Amazon Web Services (built with the invaluable help of the Amazon.com Web Services team). You can see that on the Channel 9 video as well – it’s the best way to understand why this is so useful and interesting.

The best part is that we’re showing a deep commitment to the RSS community by making the specification for these extensions available under the Creative Commons license, the same license under which the RSS 2.0 specification was released. You can read the Simple List Extension specification on the MSDN site linked below. In layman’s terms, we’re saying that anyone can implement these extensions on their site or in their application. Lawrence Lessig, founder of Creative Commons had some nice things to say about this announcement http://www.lessig.org/blog/archives/002978.shtml.

This is has been a great day, and we’re going to have lots more to say about RSS support in Longhorn at PDC ’05 in September http://www.developerpowered.com. Stay tuned. :)

You can read all about what we said today in detail from the MSDN Longhorn RSS page: http://msdn.microsoft.com/longhorn/understanding/rss/default.aspx 

Dean

 


Comments (150)

  1. Anonymous says:

    The blogosphere is abuzz from the Microsoft

    announcements at Gnomedex 5.0,

    relating to

    Longhorn,…

  2. Anonymous says:

    Integrating RSS into Windows (or Internet Explorer) is a major advance, but integrating RSS into Windows Codename Longhorn is hardly a minor one.

  3. Anonymous says:

    it will be another shame for M$….

  4. Anonymous says:

    RSS in Longhorn…this could be the biggest announcement this year… Announced at Gnomedex…but you can check out this video at Channel 9 that covers some of the detail about Longhorn, RSS and IE7. Nice… ADDITIONS: IE Blog MSDN pages on the format extensions The whole licensing of their RSS extensions under a creative commons license is a huge deal as well. The shoe photo…

  5. Anonymous says:

    Another standard to embrace, extend, extingish?

  6. Anonymous says:

    Oh it makes me sick. :/

    @kL

    "Yet another technology that Microsoft is going to embrace, twist and effectively destroy?"

    Go and see slashdot’s RSS – they do use their own extensions. Go and yell at them.

    @Willie Willson

    "Take for example, Javascript. Do you know how many sites use IE-only Javascript code, and often look broken in better browsers like Firefox?"

    You have no knowledge of JScript/JavaScript differences, do you? Both are different languages based on ECMA Script. You can not speak about FF JS as a standard, ’cause it isn’t.

  7. Anonymous says:

    I welcome platform support for RSS!

    But… Isnt this going to be a great way into your system for virusses and the sort?

  8. Anonymous says:

    Steve Rubel, sitting in the audience at Gnomedex, blogs on Internet Explorer team honcho Dean Hachamovitz’s speech, in which he reveals some of Microsoft’s RSS strategy. As expected, there’s major RSS support in the upcoming IE 7 and the not-so-upcoming…

  9. Anonymous says:

    Does IE7 heart .NET ?

  10. Anonymous says:

    Wow, amazing. Isn’t all this stuff already included in Safari and iCal?

    What’s next now that Longhorn "hearts" RSS? perhapes IE 7 "hearts" tabs?

    Are you guys at Microsoft even trying anymore? Lame.

  11. Anonymous says:

    Just a lil bit of nitpicking – IE7 UI is not consistent with current LH Explorer UI. In Explorer, you have the toolbar combined with menu in one row which is dark-colored. In IE7 in turn, the dark-colored row is used for tabs, and the menu combined with buttons is below, white (?)

  12. Anonymous says:

    Just a lil bit of nitpicking – IE7 UI is not consistent with current LH Explorer UI. In Explorer, you have the toolbar combined with menu in one row which is dark-colored. In IE7 in turn, the dark-colored row is used for tabs, and the menu combined with buttons is below, white (?)

  13. Anonymous says:

    Wow. You guys are honestly building an entire business plan around what appears to be a week’s worth of code. "Longhorn heart RSS?" Are you serious, these are just miniscule features, that are obviously ripped off from existing products, and you’re acting like this is the feature that is going to make or break IE. The interface is IDENTICAL, not similar, IDENTICAL to Safari’s. In that ridiculous HOUR LONG EXPLANATION on RSS (only Microsoft could find a way of taking a simple concept like RSS and making into a one hour explanation btw) the code didn’t even work. Don’t you guys at least test the bullshit that you’re going to feed to us, or are you really relying on everyone being such tools that they won’t notice. Sharing RSS feeds? Why are you touting that as a feature? Basically you just didn’t go out of your way to hide the feeds the user’s were subscribed to. It’s the same exact thing as importing IE favorites, Microsoft doesn’t "allow" every browser to do this, they just read a file.

    I am personally insulted by the lack of work being put into this product. It makes sense given that there appear to be no coders on that ridiculous team of yours, just endless amounts of "managers". Honestly everyone there was this manager or manager of that.

  14. Anonymous says:

    So Microsoft announces that it will incorporate RSS into its new IE7 but with modifications that will eventually turn this from a useful feature into an annoying problem. This is what we pay $300 plus for when we are forced to buy your stupid Operatinf system? You take good ideas and completely ruin them to suit Microsoft’s penchant for profit. Have you ever come up with any product that you haven’t either stolen or copied from your competitors? That is why most of us hate Microsoft and embrace newbies like Firefox. At least they don’t claim to have invented the wheel, but solely provide users with what they find useful and what they want.

  15. Anonymous says:

    Hi, I use a compliant browser, i hate you all so much. Please, just don’t develop browsers. That way everyone can use firefox. Please. PLEASE. PLEASE OH GOD.

  16. Anonymous says:

    It is not only possible, Mr. President, it is ESSENTIAL! By the way, produce a decent browser you hoes, and watch Dr. Strangelove. We Out

  17. Anonymous says:

    Why don’t you spend 3 weeks and make the thing CSS 2 compliant? From our perspective, there is only one answer.

    Another thing: Search bar? RSS? Tabs? Other browsers have had these features for years. Your corporation only maintains its hold because people don’t know about alternatives. Your business model requires that customers stay stupid.

    I don’t think you have anything to be proud of, and as technologists, you should be ashamed of yourselves.

  18. Anonymous says:

    some guy on slashdot told me to come here and tell you that you are an idiot.

    it’s true though: i hate M$. kings of innovation, ye lads. make you sure drive that ferrari extra-fast for me tonight, k?

    -andy

  19. Anonymous says:

    oh, and by the way (well probably not by the way since these comments are censored and my last one will probably not be posted), for those of you that are actually optimistic about this whole thing, forget it. Do you think that MS would actually do something for the open source community? MS HATES the OS community (pun intended). They want everything for themselves, and will gladly put out slashdot friendly news under a guise to take over the world. And $9734233 billion dollars a year can hire some damn good technical writers or whatever to do that for you. Wisen up.

    -andy

  20. Anonymous says:

    Good to hear that RSS is finally coming to majority out there. Keep it up guys.

    Oh, and I think you should ban slashdot users by sniffing HTTP_REFERER object and redirecting them back to slashdot, where is appropriate place for FUD.

  21. Anonymous says:

    One thing to IE7 creators. ;) There are some people (me amongst them) who don’t like FF’s separate search textbox. I prefer the way it works in Maxthon and to some extent in recent IE – type [something] in address bar and if it’s not a proper address – search for it in default search engine. If you type ex. [g world polution] you want to ask google about world polution. Just a thought, because I hate an idea of other than F4 shortcut to access search bar.

  22. Anonymous says:

    IE finally catches up to the rest of the world, and MS fangrubs around the world post comments like this:

    "Going far beyond Firefox offers with the listed RSS extensions shows how innovative MS really is and should shut up your detractors."

    Heh, ‘innovation’ and ‘MS’ in the same sentence – have you ever considered stand-up comedy?

    It is truly pitiful the way you saps wet your pants uncontrollably whenever the slumbering giant of Redmond happens to roll over and crack a fart..

  23. Anonymous says:

    I really don’t see what you’re excited about here, OK it’s good that you’re adding RSS support but it is nothing major. Tabs are a major engineering task (so I’m led to believe) but RSS support is Really Simple! I think the Firefox ‘Live Bookmark’ support was coded in a day, Apple’s Safari browser has excellent RSS support and these two browsers are just going to refine their RSS/Atom experience further and when Londhorn comes out it’s likely to make your support for RSS half ASSed (https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=261354).

    Come on, can we have at least some bit of innovation in IE, we need a reason to use it after all!

  24. Anonymous says:

    "There are some people (me amongst them) who don’t like FF’s separate search textbox. I prefer the way it works in Maxthon . . . If you type ex. [g world polution] you want to ask google about world polution."

    Firefox currently has this–type whatever into the address bar and you get google’s ‘I’m feeling lucky search’. This is also customizable:

    http://www.lifehacker.com/software/productivity/customize-firefox-address-bar-search-034208.php

  25. Anonymous says:

    @Anonymous

    "Open up Firefox’s “user.js” file…" – how convinient. ;) I could ask "why did they add search toolbox in the first place", but I won’t – that’s a good thing to have it anyway. ‘Feeling lucky’ as default behavior (if I understand you correctly) isn’t the best idea though (IMHO of course). Thanks for link anyway! :]

  26. Anonymous says:

    I really wish to "give a break" to people who bash "conspiracy theories", but I am amazed by blindness of such people. Here you ask "How could Microsoft do this and that with just little bit extending a standard?", and you seem not to understand what happened to JavaScript, Java and many other technologies out there, when they were ‘touched’ by Microsoft.

    One thing that makes me feel ok about this is the fact they’re releasing it under CC license, and I hope it won’t suddenly turn into blackbox (via patents or whatever means lawyers could come up with).

    What puzzles me, though, is the lack of clear answer (in either Channel 9 video or comments) to "What happens if my site has multiple feeds?" (as in multiple topic feeds, not multiple type feeds)

    As if Microsoft devs didn’t think of that, and were caught off-guard when asked that multiple times.

    I understand IE7 will catch the first feed on the page (and choose the most appropriate type), but if I have 6 feeds on a page – what happens? How IE7 deals with them?

    Product manager *specifically* said they were not interested in "flexibility", so if IE7 has no flexibility in dealing with exceptions – what can it do for me?

    Thanks.

    p.s: I bet, though, they’ll add "flexibility" before final release :)

  27. Anonymous says:

    Um excelente post de Steve Rubel sobre dez tendências web que podem revolucionar a maneira como as empresas e pessoas se comunicam e se informam. O Cluetrain já é velho conhecido. Está no ar desde 1999 colocando na web idéias…

  28. Bruce Morgan [MSFT] says:

    I talk about multiple feed handling on the video thread, and it continues on this post on Channel9:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=80934

  29. Anonymous says:

    Nice to see another user-level feature being built into an already bloated operating system. That’s exactly what customers want: a kitchen-sink operating system ready to lock you into their proprietary features…

    Call me when IE gets something as clever as RSS feeds in the form of Firefox live-bookmarks, a javascript console which actually gives you clues to errors, or support for real web standards…

    flashy presentation over substance is a long tradition in the M$ world, but you guys should change or perish…

  30. Anonymous says:

    @Sentinel

    Enlighten me: what they did to JavaScript (because they use JScript not JavaScript) and Java (oh yes, they took good idea with bad implementation, fixed it, polished and boom! we have .NET!)?

  31. Anonymous says:

    "what they did to JavaScript (because they use JScript not JavaScript)"

    Once upon a time, Netscape engineers cameup with a client-side scripting language embedded in the browser to make things a little more dynamic on the client side. They called it javascript, because Java was all the roar back then as a "serious" language for doing client-side web programming. Of course, Java applets never caught on, but javascript popularity made it one of the most used languages in web programming.

    In order to make a defacto standard into a dejuris standard, javascript was submitted for Ecma standardization a few years ago, and the Ecmascript standard was published.

    JScript is an implementation of Ecmascript, which is javascript, per se. If the J in front of it didn’t make it clear enough. Of course, M$ wouldn’t allow for such a competing technology to go in the name of one of their products…

    "and Java (oh yes, they took good idea with bad implementation, fixed it, polished and boom! we have .NET!)?"

    what exactly is better about .Net than Java? Yes, the M$ java implementation was purposefuly broken, otherwise Java could’ve been a real trouble as a desktop technology. Instead they had to go server-side. But a purposefuly broken Java runtime implementation doesn’t mean they’ve gone one better with .Net or the Borland guys crafted C#… let alone webforms being _the_ solution to web programming on the large.

    at least, Java programmers have truckloads of high quality open-source development tools and frameworks to aid them…

  32. Anonymous says:

    This is fantastic. Except for one thing…

    How about CSS support? Why can’t you do one thing well before moving onto the next shiny object like a kid with ADD?

  33. Anonymous says:

    First of all I think this stuff is great. I was, however, wondering about some of the security implications that may arise with the use enclosures. What’s to prevent someone from maliciously adding viruses or other such nasty things as an enclosure? If you are subscribed to their feed or if a feed has been compromised, and the RSS Platform is constantly downloading and processing them, what’s to stop you from download these things and having them wreak havoc? Also it’s very unlikely that an anti-virus program would catch such enclosures especially if they are newly created viri. If you’re updating your feed every hour or so, I think it would be unlikely for a virus definition to be available already. Maybe it’s just me, but I see this as potential security hazard. Have you put any preventative measures in place to stem such things from occurring

  34. Anonymous says:

    LonghornでRSSが正式サポートへ

  35. PatriotB says:

    Adam Podolnick:

    "Enclosure download is integrated with the Attachment Execute Services (AES), a windows service that maintains an allow/block list for certain file types. As a result, executable files are blocked by default from being downloaded by the Longhorn platform. Antivirus and Anti-spyware applications can also block enclosures from being downloaded."

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/longhorn/understanding/rss/rsslonghorn/

  36. Anonymous says:

    Check out the IE Blog – Longhorn loves RSS Watch the Channel 9 video Longhorn (heart) RSS – Warning its 58 minutes long! Microsoft announced at Gnomedex 5.0 that they are building RSS as a Platform in to Longhorn/IE7. Few…

  37. Anonymous says:

    Good grief! Is it really innovation to include in a future OS the same features that already exist in alternative operating systems and web browsers? Are Windows users really that clueless? Obviously Microsoft thinks so.

  38. Anonymous says:

    I can’t believe everyone is so excited about RSS. Why? Because it is embraced by MS and you fanboys jump about like it’s the next best thing since sliced bread.

  39. Anonymous says:

    And when the EU competition lawyers tell you to strip it out as it is uncompetative with comercial RSS suites, how long is it going to comply?

  40. Anonymous says:

    I was going to post alot more on RSS for IE and then it hit me. I found out about RSS for IE using my Firefox live bookmarks. Goes to show what a little innovation can do.

    Microsoft should be ashamed that it took so long to renovate IE. After all, as things stand now, Firefox, and other alternative brosers are the only ones who can take advantage of the RSS built into this blog. I think that speaks volumes about MIcrosoft, after all only they would provide a service and be the only ones whose product could not take advantage of it! Laughable, really.

    The sad part is, Americans and others are forced to shell out billions of dollars for this crapt each year. No alternative, no competition, no innovation.

  41. Anonymous says:

    - RSS is something worth mentioning, when you add it to the OS ? This is like announcing systemwide email support. Woooaaah !!

    - you made some.. ._exentension_ to the STANDARD you just integrated. Aha…

    - can you subscribe to an amazon wishlist when you deny all cookies from A’zon ?

    - yeah I love Amazon’s web guys too, as i do love Bill and all the folks you mentioned.

    Thing is your text is sooo exagerated its more a backshot :) PR wise ;) kinda like "ups I did it again" with all this nice "great folks" here and "wonderfull work" there ^^sure – culture :D

    mmmh .. need sunglasses ? :-P

  42. Anonymous says:

    *nemesis

    "Java applets never caught on"

    Surely not in .microsoft.com domain, but they are quite popular, as for example online explanation of physics laws, chats, etc.

    "JScript is an implementation of Ecmascript, which is javascript, per se."

    That doesn’t change a thing: they are both ECMA script _implementations_. It’s this kind of thinking IE-lovers present: IE was first, IE is a standard. No it is not. And no, JavaScript is not a standard – ECMA script is. JavaScript and JScript are just implementations.

    "Yes, the M$ java implementation was purposefuly broken, otherwise Java could’ve been a real trouble as a desktop technology."

    I love conspiracy theories. =]

    "at least, Java programmers have truckloads of high quality open-source development tools and frameworks to aid them…"

    And? You see – I have no difficulties in paying for software. If something is free and worth using and authors provide PayPal account – I always support them. What’s bad in making and spending money?

  43. Anonymous says:

    RSS is the OS sounds like a good idea.

    I just hope that it’s not tied too closely to IE because I would like to use an RSS features (presuming that it is well implemented, of course) but I can’t see myself going back to using Internet Explorer.

  44. Anonymous says:

    ROC: "There are some people (me amongst them) who don’t like FF’s separate search textbox. I prefer the way it works in Maxthon . . . If you type ex. [g world polution] you want to ask google about world polution."

    I also do not like FF’s separate search textbox, so I have written an IE toolbar which combines the two textboxes into only one. Lets have a look: http://www.quero.at/

  45. Anonymous says:

    "Simple List Extensions"? I just don’t understand why this would be necessary or what’s missing from RSS right now that you can’t produce and control ordered lists of your own. As a developer, I’m thoroughly confused by this: if I have to add/change the XML that is the RSS feed, then I can add/change the XML *right now* and produce and kind of sorting or listing I wish because I’m the one in control of the XML feed already, I simply don’t need Longhorn’s, uh, "help" in this way. When you have a nice ADO.Net provider for RSS I’ll get back on the bandwagon. But for now? Sheesh.

  46. Anonymous says:

    The eyes of the internet were on Seattle for three days over the weekend as the "unconference" Seattle’s tech elite cooked up raged on the waterfront. At Technorati the current number one search is for "Gnomedex." That in itself is a noteworthy event and we’ll be slightly saddened when…

  47. Anonymous says:

    So far, your RSS announcement has focused almost exclusively on implications for IE7.

    Can you talk specifically about the roadmap for Outlook and how it will change baed on this embrace of RSS?

    Thanks!

  48. Anonymous says:

    So you mean I’ll be able to browse RSS feeds in IE? Great! When’s that available 2007? Too bad I’m doing that right now with Safari.

    Yet another example of Microsoft’s lagging behind in innovation and then arriving late to the party acting like saviors. Maybe someone who’s never booted anything but Windows will be impressed when they finally get RSS feeds in IE — yet little will they realize they’re already two years behind everyone else.

    What’s next? Tabbed browsing?

  49. UnexpectedBill says:

    In regards to Jen’s earlier comments:

    > BTW, Thank you IE team for doing this blog in

    > general – I enjoy reading the updates, and

    > it’s kinda cool to "meet" some of the people

    > behind IE. Everyone is always very nice and

    > courteous when they post.

    I for one am certainly glad to see the IE team out here posting all the great news that’s seemingly coming to IE7. But being a Windows 2000 user–it means almost nothing to me. I’ll have to run IE7 on VMWare/WinXP just to experience it.

    > Also – it makes me feel very sad when people

    > post comments bashing IE or MSFT in general.

    On the one hand, I do feel bad when people bash the IE team and Microsoft…but on the other…there are some really boneheaded moves being made here with the release of IE7 that just don’t make any sense. Not having at least partial support (say, rendering updates, RSS support, etc…) for IE7 on Windows 2000 is really quite…dumb.

    That’s not excusable and it really upsets me.

    > Yes, their software is not perfect, but no

    > software is. They are working to improve it.

    But at the same time a lot of users are being left out in the cold on platforms (Win2000) that are still quite viable and certainly updateable with a moderate effort.

    I really think the IE team knows this. The activity on this blog has been pretty quiet–until the post about not having Win2k support came up. Then a lot of posts came to "push that Win2k post down" so it would not be seen by people who don’t look beyond the first page.

    I hope this is constructive critiscism to the IE team…and I hope it doesn’t fall on totally deaf ears. I fear, however, that no IE7 of any sort on Win2000 will be the outcome.

    That said–there was a post recently made about printing "tomatoes". I assume this means something different "across the pond". Would anyone (IE team or otherwise) mind explaining what that means in "American English", if it means something different???

  50. tzagotta says:

    I think the reason for this is that Win2K is at end-of-life (EOL):

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/default.mspx

    I don’t think the IE team could really justify supporting an OS that is at EOL. Maybe an argument could be made that Win2K went EOL too soon, but this is not really an IE issue.

  51. ieblog says:

    UnexpectedBill,

    Tomatoes! It’s an old joke on the team as I come from England orginally and I am valiantly trying to educate my American colleagues on the pronunciation. American’s say Tom-A-Toe whereas the British tend to say Tom-R-Toe.

    Thanks

    -Dave Massy [MSFT]

  52. UnexpectedBill says:

    Dave,

    Thanks for explaining the humor in the "tomatoes" reference. *Now* I can say "I get it!".

    I really do wish you folks on the IE team were considering at least a rendering update for us Windows 2000 users, but I’m still looking forward to seeing the beta and giving some feedback on it.

  53. Anonymous says:

    Looks like this could be very interesting. I would however beg you to get rid of the orange button, or at least change the text from RSS to something else. The acronym RSS means absolutely nothing to the majority of the people who will be using the browser, don’t assume it is something they will learn, I still know normal users who have no idea what html means (nor should they need to).

  54. Anonymous says:

    I cover all of the highlights of Gnomedex and then some I wanted to give you all my my perspective….

  55. Anonymous says:

    I cover all of the highlights of Gnomedex and then some I wanted to give you all my my perspective. We will be putting up some of the sessions that we felt were very important on the TechPodcasts.com website over…

  56. Anonymous says:

    Cool, I like this:

    "[…] we’ve been talking to the great folks at Amazon.com about using these extensions, and, at Gnomedex, Amar and I showed a prototype application working live against Amazon.com wish lists built using Amazon Web Services (built with the invaluable help of the Amazon.com Web Services team). […]"

    ….not long ago I have actually been trying to use SharePoint as a Photoblog, and use the webservice to retrieve lists of items and pack an RSS Feed for it….

    Sure there are pieces of software out there that you can INSTALL on a sharepoint to get it done…. but that’s the part I don’t like: INSTALLing them… I want to be able to do that remotely, on servers I don’t manage… there is no native RSS in SharePoint, but the web service can return the lists on it… :-)

  57. Anonymous says:

    The comments from the FF guys on this blog are *so* repetitive. Have any of you guys got anything useful to say other than “I hate M$”?

    I think part of your problem is that Microsoft is actually doing a lot of things right now – focusing on security, making their browser standards compliant, implementing the browser features that users want and bringing great technologies like RSS to a wider audience. This leaves the open source community nothing left to whine about other than to dig up the past.

    Personally, I find this RSS support pretty exciting. The IE7 interface looks really good – as does the new Longhorn UI. They’ve gone for simplicity which I think is absolutely essential in a browser, and is what makes Safari the best browser available at the moment IMHO.

    The RSS support in FF is good, but I found some of the features quite frustrating from a user perspective and ended up switching to RSS Bandit. Ideally you want your RSS client to be your browser because before long you’ll be navigating from a feed to a webpage and it’s often quite difficult conceptually to define exactly where the dividing line is between the world of RSS and the web.

    Implementing widely used technologies into the OS is going to make Longhorn an attractive proposition I think – an OS from Microsoft that perhaps can finally compete with MacOS for user experience. Next up should be a fully integrated BitTorrent client as part of the OS. :) It would be fantastic, but I guess MS is probably too scared of the courts now to innovate like that!

  58. Anonymous says:

    M$ is at it again…

  59. Anonymous says:

    I find it really sad how Microsoft is getting blasted all the time. It’s a no-win situation, since if they try and improve the OS, they get blamed for copying Apple. Even though none of you know if this is true: how do you know this was not something planned for XP but scrapped, picked up by Apple and independantley rejuvenated by Microsoft? The answer is: you don’t. Noone knows. Could be a coincidence, and since Apple don’t have SafariRSS UI copryright, Microsoft can use the advantage of building off a proven model. Not a bad thing, user-experience wise.

    I’ll say that Microsoft’s OSes up to now have looked… well, kinda ugly. XP was something new, but the novelty wore off. Longhorn is were that’s all going to change: notice how noone pays attention to Microsoft’s innovations over Apple. The Aero Glass Tier interface is a unique interface. It includes an interactive environment that is sure to be subject to copying by apple… conveniently ignored by people. Also, Apple get away with far greater antitrust breaches than MS. Probably due to the almost non-existant commerical apple software market (photoshop, office, virtual pc… that’s about it…).

    Internet Explorer 7 looks amazing. I honestly can’t wait to get my hands on my copy of Longhorn with IE7 included and integrated so deeply into the OS. I don’t count the XP version, because its intended to satisfy a user demand, but the way its meant to be used is on longhorn. The problem lies with the lack of extensions for IE. Hey, there are basically none. We can get toolbars and ActiveX objects (hehe, and tonnes of spyware with it, which MS are also trying to combat), but Firefox allows users to uniquely manage a subset of these easily. They are safer than ActiveX objects and a lot more accessible, and can add amazing things to the product. If IE is to truley best Opera and Firefox, it is going to need a reform of its position with regards to extensions. Great job on RSS, I love the look of it, and can’t wait for the BETA – show all these morons down!

  60. Anonymous says:

    Great, so here we have yet another standard technology that M$ wants to molest, add their little bits and put back out to the world. That worked really well with IE, Java, etc before didn’t it… Oh hang on no it never.

  61. Anonymous says:

    Better tell me why do you block right clicks on links in Mozilla Firefox on your site, MSN? Do you have to use the dirty tricks to fight with your competitors, instead of simply making a decent browser?

  62. Anonymous says:

    Blackice: "The problem lies with the lack of extensions for IE. Hey, there are basically none."

    That is not right. There are hundreds of useful extension for IE, mostly free.

  63. Anonymous says:

    damn, i don’t see why everyone is excited about Longhorn. It began as something fresh, new, nice with many new features (WinFS for example).

    What remains after years of scrapping ‘innovative’ features is nothing more than XP+. All the remaining features are not new, nor innovative.

    Super desktop search: Spotlight anyone?

    Glass: Carbon

    IE7: shameless copy of safari

    Can’t you see it, m$ has been making crap for years. Why is it that Apple and Linux don’t have big security issues, BSOD’s ( Blue Screen O Dead ), crashes and all that other nonsense? OPEN YOUR EYES PEOPLE!!. m$ seems to trick you everytime, saying it’s big, new, innovative, a must-have, and you just accept it.

    my advice is: don’t believe those idiots in Redmond, don’t buy Longhorn!

    Abiboe

    <a href=’http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/you.html‘> click </a>

  64. Anonymous says:

    &amp;nbsp;

    Lots of changes in my work life in the past year months. About 10 months ago, I joined the IE…

  65. Anonymous says:

    All this bull and no one even bothered to mentiontion the more then 12 new RSS tags added by apple for iTunes. And worse, some of them duplicate content that would normally go in the regular rss tags.

    http://phobos.apple.com/static/podcast_specifications.pdf

  66. Anonymous says:

    There is no earthly reason why an operating system should have RSS support.

    It’s kind of ironic, how this IE blog has become a flameware zone.

  67. Anonymous says:

    &amp;nbsp;

    Lots of changes in my work life in the past year months. About 10 months ago, I joined the IE…

  68. Anonymous says:

    Great stuff.

    Going far beyond Firefox offers with the listed RSS extensions shows how innovative MS really is and should shut up your detractors.

  69. Anonymous says:

    I’m impressed, here’s to hoping this materialises into something useful for the majority of users, and not just the RSS savy.

  70. Anonymous says:

    This sounds really great, and you guys sound really excited about it too. I can’t wait to try it out! Making RSS easier to use for the masses (ie, computer-unsavy folks like my father) is a powerful thing to do. Thank you for that!

    BTW, Thank you IE team for doing this blog in general – I enjoy reading the updates, and it’s kinda cool to "meet" some of the people behind IE. Everyone is always very nice and courteous when they post. Also – it makes me feel very sad when people post comments bashing IE or MSFT in general. Yes, their software is not perfect, but no software is. They are working to improve it. Constructive criticism is fine, but hate posts are not. Developers are people too.

    (it should be noted that I am dating a software engineer, so I have a softspot for geeks, developers in general and don’t like when people are so mean to them.) So folks, please don’t be mean to the IE guys, ok?

  71. tzagotta says:

    Watched the video, read the news. But won’t integration into Longhorn push widespread availability of this functionality too far into the future?

    In other words, by the time Longhorn is released, wouldn’t it be the case that these problems have already been solved in other ways, and that generally, the usage scenareos would have changed by then?

    It just seems like there is a strong need for this now, but putting it into Longhorn doesn’t really seem to meet the desired time-to-market.

  72. Rosyna says:

    Kind of confused about the Calendar example. Doesn’t something already exist for that specifically for Calendars? Sounds like the wheel is being uselessly reinvented. You’ve got the ics format already.

  73. Anonymous says:

    Where developers can get sample RSS feeds

    with new extensions for testing?

  74. Anonymous says:

    The thing about the calendar is: It stays in sync with the RSS feed that’s got the ICS files (via enclosures). So anybody publishing their calendar as an RSS feed will allow people to be synchronized to it.

  75. Rosyna says:

    So why does RSS need a "List Extension" to do Calendar things when it seems to be working fine right now via enclosures?

  76. Anonymous says:

    One question I didn’t see answered in the video was how it will handle a page with multiple feeds (say one feed for news, one for pictures, one for announcements… not one ATOM, one RSS 2.0, etc.). It looks really cool… can’t wait till beta 1 of Longhorn!

  77. Anonymous says:

    "I also announced some enhancements to RSS,"

    Yet another technology that Microsoft is going to embrace, twist and effectively destroy?

    http://www.levien.com/free/decommoditizing.html

  78. Anonymous says:

    Wow, you guys just don’t know where to draw the line, do you?

    I’m really saddened that Microsoft has decided to defy standards yet again and alter RSS feeds so that they won’t work in other news readers. You’ve done ruined Javascript; why must you go in and infect other products as well? It’s like you guys are poison, destroying the veins of the Internet. Your IE-only hacks are getting old.

    Best regards,

    Willie Wilson <webmaster@codernet.net>

  79. Anonymous says:

    Microsoft has a new home page for RSS in Longhorn. Here’s a reasonably simplified&amp;nbsp;explanation of RSS Support in Longhorn. The specification itself is here. This license information appears at the bottom of the specification page: Microsoft&amp;rsquo;s copyrights in this specification are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (version 2.5)….

  80. ryanmy says:

    "I’m really saddened that Microsoft has decided to defy standards yet again and alter RSS feeds"

    The RSS 2.0 spec specifically encouraged extension, and designed it with that purpose in mind — and other browsers, including the precious Firefox, have done so already.

    The spec for Microsoft modifications is free-as-in-speech AND open — Microsoft released it under a Creative Commons copyleft license, so that others may implement it. They even state that there are no patents they know of on it, and if a patent arises, they intend to offer a royalty-free license to all users.

  81. Anonymous says:

    "I’m really saddened that Microsoft has decided to defy standards yet again…"

    Get a clue. Once RSS1.0 was created should everyone have stuck with it?

    They are making a simple addition:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/longhorn/understanding/rss/simplefeedextensions

    And releasing the detailed specification under the same license that the RSS2.0 authors used.

    If you don’t like it, don’t use it in your feed. Your feed will still work just fine in IE7/Longhorn. If you want to be compatible with feeds that do use it, the spec if open and public so you can do so.

    Just yelling "Change is bad!" will not earn you any points. If you want to go look at the spec and tell us *why* the extensions (to a specification that was designed from the ground up to allow for extensions) are bad, I would be interested in your thoughts.

    Jorgie

  82. Anonymous says:

    Creative Commons is not automatically an open standard.

    There are 6 different versions of lisencing on the CC site, and some are far from open.

    If microsoft is looking to release its code under an open license is should pick the GPL or BSD.

    Creative Commons allows MS to adopt RSS (embrace) , extend it with IE/Windows only extensions (extend) and then patent the whole thing as theirs. (extinguish)

    Just like they always do.

  83. Anonymous says:

    " Creative Commons is not automatically an open standard."

    You are correct, but they are specifically releasing it under the "Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License" verstion 2.5.

    ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/ )

    Because RSS2.0 Spec was released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, it makes a great deal of sense for them to do the same.

    Why aren’t you bitching at the authors of the RSS2.0 spec since they did not release it under the GPL? Are you saying we should boycott the whole RSS2.0 spec because it is not GPLed?

  84. Anonymous says:

    Jeremy Wright just pointed a comment over at

    http://www.digital-web.com/news/2005/06/microsoft_to_take_rss_five_steps_backwards/#comment1361

    and pointed out the fact that the stuff MS is doing it actually fairly syndication agnostic. (Read: ‘not just rss’) They HAD to extend RSS to get the functionality they wanted that already exists the ATOM spec.

    So if you are worried that they will some how *screw you* if you try to use their extensions, just use ATOM and the functionality is already there.

  85. Anonymous says:

    Sorry, perhaps you missed my point.

    Microsoft has always had a reputation for mucking things up. Take for example, Javascript. Do you know how many sites use IE-only Javascript code, and often look broken in better browsers like Firefox? A LOT. Feeds will adapt to this Microsoft-only idea, and soon, all the good newsreaders will not display RSS right, and many people will be forced to use IE7 if they want to read the feed.

    Very good tactic Microsoft; you sure had me fooled. I’m still not interested in IE7, though.

    Best regards,

    Willie Wilson <webmaster@codernet.net>

  86. Anonymous says:

    I am excited about the RSS but will IE 7 support XForms?

  87. tzagotta says:

    The old "conspiracy theory"…

    So, you feel that MS added these extensions intentionally to create incompatibilities to increase market share for their browser? If you feel this was the case, then please explain the cause-effect of how that could work as a strategy.

    Also, please explain how that could work here. So, you’re saying that MS is extending RSS to intentionally create incompatibilities and break other RSS readers?

    Give me a break!

  88. Anonymous says:

    Sounds good. I’m being carefully optimistic about this. I hope the list extension gets wide support in other browsers too. (It most likely will if you ask me.)

  89. ryanmy says:

    "and then patent the whole thing as theirs. (extinguish) Just like they always do."

    Funny, truth really is stranger than fiction.

    "As to software implementations, Microsoft is not aware of any patent claims it owns or controls that would be necessarily infringed by a software implementation that conforms to the specification’s extensions. If Microsoft later becomes aware of any such necessary patent claims, Microsoft also agrees to offer a royalty-free patent license on reasonable and non-discriminatory terms and conditions to any such patent claims for the purpose of publishing and consuming the extensions set out in the specification."

  90. Anonymous says:

    "Feeds will adapt to this Microsoft-only idea, and soon, all the good newsreaders will not display RSS right, and many people will be forced to use IE7 if they want to read the feed."

    Talk about spreading FUD..

    Go look at their extension. If your feed needs the features provided by their extension, you will use it (or switch to ATOM) if it doesn’t you wont.

    It is a simple extension that is fully documented and freely available to anyone who has authored a feedreader. Again I ask ‘Should everyone have stuck with RSS0.9?’ because it was ‘good enough’???

  91. Anonymous says:

    > So, you feel that MS added these extensions intentionally to

    > create incompatibilities to increase market share for their

    > browser? If you feel this was the case, then please explain the > cause-effect of how that could work as a strategy.

    Nope. Its because, after seeing other Microsoftd "products" we know how MS twists everything. Html, CSS, Java and now RSS. But at least its not happening until Longhorn. And that after OS X 10.4.4 at least…

  92. Anonymous says:

    Ok… I MS service that can’t do unicode… I have great hopes for their extension of RSS feeds. Jaed (I have a three letter name, guess which lig the the second is…)

  93. Anonymous says:

    Microsoft gets ATOM

  94. Anonymous says:

    Would sites that are supported by advertising be a factor in the widespread use of RSS feeds?

    Namely, some sites might prefer that you went to them rather than their information coming to you.

  95. Anonymous says:

    Sheesh! It’s really hard for Microsoft to cut a break from some people. Perhaps those who think this is a sly and evil tactic need to understand how XML and RSS are designed for extensibility without breaking compatibility with older versions.

    Also, I don’t think they mentioned their source code being released under any Creative Commons license, it is ONLY the RSS Extension SPECIFICATIONS that are being released.

  96. Anonymous says:

    Great. MS comes in and now there’s no way for ISVs to innovate. Please, just stop.

    Dean, are you aware of Microsoft’s history? We have a good thing going with this RSS stuff. Do the right thing.

  97. Anonymous says:

    There has been a lot of coverage already about Microsoft’s RSS in Longhorn announcements, so my aim here is to distil it and get to the essence of it. I’m doing this for my own benefit really, but hopefully my…

  98. Anonymous says:

    Thank God for Firefox, or else IE (and the web browsing world) would be stuck in the stoneage!

  99. Anonymous says:

    Sounds great! But PLEASE add mouse gestures!

  100. Kevin Daly says:

    "No way for ISVs to innovate"?

    Why, did Microsoft break their Magic Innovation Bone or something?

    Give me a break. RSS was *designed* to be extensible, and MS have gone out of their way to play nicely. This specification creates opportunities for innovation by expanding the types of content and usage scenarios available to developers.

    Still, I’ll be happy to explore those opportunities by myself while others are whining, wringing their hands and exchanging conspiracy theories.

  101. Anonymous says:

    Longhorn + RSS &amp;amp; Atom

    Hey, I see Microsoft announced RSS Support in Longhorn; good stuff! The services…

  102. Anonymous says:

    What a coincidence. Exactly a month ago I was trying to reach someone in MS who is doing work on RSS and my contact told me "there is no such group in MS". I went on to researching deep in this area and various technology options and wrote a paper on RSS and Calendar Integration (which got slashdotted later):

    http://www.shitalshah.com/articlelist.aspx?file=articles%5cRSSCalendar.htm&title=RSS+And+Calendar+Integration&heading=RSS+And+Calendar+Integration

    I’m really interested to see how Amar’s team implemented this functionality.

  103. I was reading on this blog about how Longhorn loves RSS.

    While I’m one who always likes new features….

  104. Weddings says:

    Earlier today, I went to downtown Seattle to Gnomedex 5.0, and stood up in front of 300 tech influentials, enthusiasts and leaders to talk about some really exciting things that we’ve been working on for the past several months. The main thing I talke

  105. Bit-cycling says:

    Lots of changes in my work life in the past year months. About 10 months ago, I joined the IE team to