Hiring IE Evangelist


The information published in this post is now out-of-date.

—IEBlog Editor, 21 August 2012

Jeremy Mazner just posted news on his blog that there is a position opening for a technical evangelist focusing on IE.  That’s great news! Working either on or with the IE team is definitely a great experience.

Thanks
-Dave


Comments (24)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Sure, I’ll just say: Acid2, CSS2, PNG, XHTML, HTTP/1.1 and you’ll have 10 resumes below my post.

  2. Anonymous says:

    It seems there’s also 12 openings on the IE Team by looking at the Microsoft Career site. A few of them pertain to working on the RSS reading portion of IE7.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Interesting how Microsoft has to hire an IE evangelist, whereas most of those "less-popular" browsers have "evangelical" fanatics (e.g. spreadfirefox.com) that do so completely for free! Keep spreading the propaganda boys.

    If you come anywhere close to my expectations for standards support, you can sign me up for free.

  4. PatriotB says:

    I just did a search on the careers page for IE, and it gives out a lot of good info on what’s coming up in future IE. It would be great to have some blog entries on the subject–seeing that there’s public info out there (on the careers page) the "we can’t say" policy should be about over…

  5. Anonymous says:

    I think you need to have some new technology to tell people about before you can evangelize it. I also think that if you do have new technology to evangelize, you should just start telling people–starting with this blog–and not wait for an evangelist.

  6. Anonymous says:

    You know, putting out a product that speaks for itself (by performance) would probably be much more efficient than simply hiring a dedicated indviual to yap about it.

    By the way, what does this post have to do with IE?

  7. Anonymous says:

    Note that the "Evangelist" positions at Microsoft are typically designed to facilitate customer evangelism, not replace it.

    It isn’t about "yapping about" the product. A true evangelist knows where his product rocks and knows where others don’t, and can help balance that.

    It’s too bad I’m not really looking for a job right now, as otherwise I’d be quite interested (since I already do this).

  8. Anonymous says:

    PatriotB: Links? They seem a little hard to find.

  9. PatriotB says:

    http://www.microsoft.com/careers/search/default.aspx

    Then look for product="Internet Explorer"

  10. Anonymous says:

    IE needs an usability evangelist that sings how good user experience matters in all kind of scenarios, even the non-enterprise targeting ones, to the IE team itself. We do not want to see Avalon sites that only try to annoy the user with all kinds of new tricks trying to fool users to purchase something by accident.

    For starters there should be a design and web experience targeted documents and presentations very directly linked from the IDE. Perhaps when you start installing VS you will be presented straight away with selection, one of the options being "Are you a web developer" and while installing this would play a video presentation with some important guidelines related to the area you are developing in.

  11. Anonymous says:

    So in the mean time, Opera and Firefox have tested betas, and released new releases of their browser.

    Ok, so rumours are IE beta is being rolled out to beta testers, but really, if it takes you this long to roll out a beta and much longer for a final, when other browsers can do it quicker and better, perhaps you should focus on trying to make a secure OS, and let the other browsers do what microsoft can’t do any more.

    It’s kind of hard, I would think for anyone to rave about IE, it’s old and stale, like OE, and well over due of an overhaul, only problem is, once you do it, firefox and opera will have matched and bettered any advance you can do, and release their finals while you are still blinking your eyes.

    Frankly the IE and OE team should be fired, and people who know what they are doing, and can do it better and faster hired. Hmmm, perhaps Bill should start hiring from Opera and Firefox

  12. Anonymous says:

    ::sigh::

    The IE Team create an interface with customers via this blog, and people jump down their throats all the time…

    If you just build in perfect standards compliance, then you will get what… Firefox? That’s one of its main targets as well…

    Personally, I can see exactly where this role is coming from. Part of the community is shouting for standards compliance (and it *is* important), but there are also a lot of people out there who use IE to develop rich client applications using combinations of things from scripting, like Xml-Http AJAX stuff through to developers utilizing the support for hosted Windows Forms controls. So the fact that the IE team put a lot of hard work into adding developer value in ways that are outside of the description of the standards is important too. You shouldn’t be afraid to innovate.

    I just wonder if this side of the community is being heard enough – maybe they are too busy working to write about their wants on this blog, eh? ::grin::

    Seriously, I’m worried about those who shout loudest getting heard. I prefer to listen to everyone – and hey, if they aren’t talking, I’ll ask them.

  13. Anonymous says:

    > If you just build in perfect standards compliance, then you will get what… Firefox?

    Uh oh, no, Opera and Safari have ‘perfect standards’ as a goal too, and they’re not Firefox…

    At all

    > That’s one of its main targets as well…

    Given the fact that browsers are HTML/CSS/JS interpretation engine, the least they should do is have perfect standards compliance you know.

    Like… a car should be road-compliant, you don’t build cars with square wheels just cause all of the other cars have round ones and you don’t like that…

    And BTW better standard compliance may put more green and less red in here (http://nanobox.chipx86.com/browser_support.php#forward)

  14. Anonymous says:

    Sounds lame…

    I agree with the posts saying that if you make a good product, people will "Preach the word"

    I use firefox and encourage others to use it as well because it’s better. If IE was better I’d use it.

  15. Anonymous says:

    Hi Masklinn,

    >Uh oh, no, Opera and Safari have ‘perfect >standards’ as a goal too, and they’re not >Firefox…

    >At all

    Fair point… but it is quite common to see features creep from browser to browser… hence making it hard to identify the "best" browser. It seems to me that standards compliance is possible given the effort (if it’s important to MS, they’ll do it); so, to make a "better" browser, what do you then invest in?

    >Given the fact that browsers are HTML/CSS/JS >interpretation engine, the least they should >do is have perfect standards compliance you >know.

    Some cars have better engines than others… some are more efficient than others, some faster. Yes, they do the same thing at a basic level, but there is an amazing gap in execution… Formula One vs. Road Car? So all cars [not mine at the moment :-)] move, just not in the same way… they all have a minimum set of functionality they need to fulfill… just like most browsers tend to render most pages correctly. (I’m going to regret saying that!).

    >Like… a car should be road-compliant, you >don’t build cars with square wheels just >cause all of the other cars have round ones >and you don’t like that…

    Square wheels would be stupid. They add no value. Infact, they impede basic functionality… I don’t think you can say that extras like XML-HTTP, Xml data islands, and Windows Forms controls hosted in the browser are the equivalent of square wheels.

    So, standards compliance is a worthwhile goal. But it’s not the only one.

  16. Anonymous says:

    Masklinn,

    http://nanobox.chipx86.com/browser_support.php#forward

    This link is very useful, thank you.

  17. Anonymous says:

    Another thing I wanted to ask the IE team was when we could start seeing some real posts here.

    There are either no posts or posts with limited content. Even this post is a copout. It’s a link to someone else’s post. I think that it should be here, as it is relevant to IE but as the first post in 6 days and only 4 in 20 day’s it’s pretty sad. It looks as though this blog needs some life. I think it needs a schedule and some content.

    Schedule:

    It would be great if someone could post every Monday and Thursday or something like that, it is extremely erratic at the time being.

    Content:

    I hear there’s a publication ban or something, what’s this about? How wide is the scope of this ban? Why is it in effect? When is it over and can we get around it somehow.

    Could an IE staff please reply and show that you care about this Blog.

  18. ieblog says:

    Nathan, We do care about this blog and we do our best to post on a regular basis. As I’m sure you realise we also have lots of work to do on the product as well though :-)

    If there are topics you’d like to hear about otehr than IE7 please let us know. We understand that everyone wants to know details about IE7 and we’ll start to discuss that as we proceed further with the project.

    Thanks

    -Dave Massy

  19. Anonymous says:

    Don’t post. Please, neglect this blog. The fact that you aren’t posting as much tells me you’re all hard at work on something much more important. No matter how much we’d like to hear more about the new Microsoft browser, nothing’s going to be more exciting than actually getting a hold of it. 😉

  20. Anonymous says:

    http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/hyatt/

    Has been a very interesting read over the last week.

    How is IE coping with Acid2? – some openness on the IE team’s part here would be welcomed.

    After all, the blog linked to above is written by an Apple employee – They’re quite a secretive company you know. :)

    If they allow one of their browser engineers to write about how he’s striving to get their browser to follow the CSS specs – can’t Microsoft allow you to do the same?

    Browsers use open standards, so why be so secretive about your level of support for these standards?

    Perhaps because it wouldn’t make very nice reading….

  21. Anonymous says:

    > Hi Masklinn,

    Hello

    >>Uh oh, no, Opera and Safari have ‘perfect >>standards’ as a goal too, and they’re not >>Firefox…

    >>At all

    > Fair point… but it is quite common to see features creep from browser to browser… hence making it hard to identify the "best" browser.

    Well, identifying the best browser is hard, identifying the worst one isn’t, especially when considering web standards.

    > It seems to me that standards compliance is possible given the effort (if it’s important to MS, they’ll do it); so, to make a "better" browser, what do you then invest in?

    I don’t quite get the question here (sorry, not native english speaker).

    >>Given the fact that browsers are HTML/CSS/JS >>interpretation engine, the least they should >>do is have perfect standards compliance you >>know.

    > Some cars have better engines than others… some are more efficient than others, some faster. Yes, they do the same thing at a basic level, but there is an amazing gap in execution… Formula One vs. Road Car? So all cars [not mine at the moment :-)] move, just not in the same way… they all have a minimum set of functionality they need to fulfill… just like most browsers tend to render most pages correctly. (I’m going to regret saying that!).

    Very good, so you’ll agree on the fact that all browsers should be able to do the basics (rendering pages)?

    Therefore all the browsers should have a high standard compliance, they can then be differentiated based on efficiency (caching?) or speed (preloading, rendering speed, JS execution speed) or additional features (popups blocking, tabbed browsing, ease of activating/desactivating features, …)

    >>Like… a car should be road-compliant, you >>don’t build cars with square wheels just >>cause all of the other cars have round ones >>and you don’t like that…

    > Square wheels would be stupid. They add no value. Infact, they impede basic functionality… I don’t think you can say that extras like XML-HTTP, Xml data islands, and Windows Forms controls hosted in the browser are the equivalent of square wheels.

    Why would a square-wheels be stupid? You can’t consider it because you’ve always seen round ones, but were roads built for square wheels (hint: MSHTML+ActiveX+VBScript) then square wheels would become perfectly efficient…

    > So, standards compliance is a worthwhile goal. But it’s not the only one.

    Of course not, it’s not the only goal but it’s the basic one, it should be the bottom line of every decent browser.