Avenues of Support for IE


I have noticed going through the comments for our entries, that some people have started posting comments that are specific asks for help with IE issues.

This blog is not focused on being a support forum, but we will try to help people as we can.  If you are looking for more expedient and focused help please see the Microsoft Internet Explorer Support page – http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/support/default.mspx.

Also please use the Contact link (http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/contact.aspx) as mechanism for issues/items you would like to be discussed on IEBlog.

Thanks.
Scott

Comments (9)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Is this true? What is the problem with XHTML?

    http://ln.hixie.ch/?start=1086158925&count=1

    »Another point that came out of the discussions is that, in case there was any doubt, Internet Explorer in Longhorn will not support XHTML or SVG. (Microsoft suggested they would need some significantly more comprehensive test suites before they started working on standards compliance again.)«

  2. Anonymous says:

    We moderated the previous comment as it contained a direct link to exploit code of issue that we are currently investigating.

    Here is our public statement on the issue:

    Microsoft is investigating reports of a vulnerability in Windows that could enable an attacker to place a malicious file on a user’s system. This vulnerability appears to impact Internet Explorer 6.x on all supported versions of Windows, including Windows XP Service Pack 2. Early reports indicate that user action is required to execute this attack. An attacker would need to first entice a user to visit a specific website and then entice a user to take a specific action on the web page, which would then cause a malicious file from the website to be copied to the user’s startup folder and executed upon the next reboot or logoff/logon. Microsoft continues to investigate the issue to determine the appropriate course of action to protect our customers. This might include providing a fix through our monthly update release process or an out-of-cycle update, depending on customer needs.

    We know that exploit code in and of itself is not dangerous, but we would appreciate it if people would not post direct links to exploit code to the IEBlog for issues we have under investigation.

    On a side note, if you have a security issue in IE you would like to report, please submit it the Microsoft Security Response Center – https://s.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/alertus.aspx.

    Thanks.

    Scott

    IE Team

  3. Anonymous says:

    XHTML’s problems, IMO, stem from the fact that it’s hard for an unsophisticated user to produce a valid document. They can no longer cut-and-paste bits of HTML code from View Source and have any expectation that it will work. If interpreted strictly with an XML parser, XHTML pages won’t even load unless they’re well-formed and valid. The preponderance of invalid RSS feeds suggests that arbitrary end-users just won’t get this right – aggregator authors have had to essentially code around those feeds. I’m using RSS as an example as it’s now – unlike XHTML – a widely-deployed XML application with multiple independently-developed providers and consumers.

    The second problem is that XHTML 1.0 and 1.1 don’t really offer anything over HTML 4.01. Few sites even declare use of HTML 4.01 correctly, even Transitional, let alone Strict. The general end-user does not ‘get’ styles or stylesheets – look at how the typical user uses Word. Very few users actually use the style capabilities of Word or other word processors: they just use the Bold, Italic, Underline formatting commands and the font and font size drop-lists. Newer versions of HTML are all about suppressing explicit layout in the document and performing layout in the stylesheet and as such offer very little to the end user. XHTML 2.0 goes a step further and removes explicit layout tags such as <b>, <i>, <font> etc, forcing the use of stylesheets.

    This causes a lot of problems for websites such as forums – and blogs! – where users can contribute their own content with markup. An additional processing step would be required to parse HTML snippets and convert to conforming XHTML, rather than just including the user’s HTML in the page (which you shouldn’t do, if you’re an author, due to the risk of malicious users adding scripts or careless users failing to close tags, wrecking the page markup).

  4. Anonymous says:

    > On a side note, if you have a security issue in IE you

    > would like to report, please submit it the Microsoft

    > Security Response Center –

    > https://s.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/alertus.aspx

    Read FD.

    –Thomas

  5. Anonymous says:

    > XHTML’s problems, IMO, stem from the fact that it’s

    > hard for an unsophisticated user to produce a valid

    > document.

    These users can use HTML if they don’t know XHTM, but especially XHTML 1.0 is not so different from HTML 4.01.

    > If interpreted strictly with an XML parser, XHTML

    > pages won’t even load unless they’re well-formed and

    > valid.

    Yes and this is really great! It helps authors to write good code.

    > The second problem is that XHTML 1.0 and 1.1 don’t

    > really offer anything over HTML 4.01.

    XHTML 1.1 is mucch cleaner than HTML 4.01 and you can insert other XML based documents.

    > XHTML 2.0 goes a step further and removes explicit

    > layout tags such as <b>, <i>, <font> etc, forcing

    > the use of stylesheets.

    <font> is already gone, it is deprecated since HTML 4.01 (and gone in strict).

    <i> and <b> will be replaced by the semantic tags <em> and <strong>.

    Altogether, I know that XHTML is not the doctype for everyone /now/, but it is definetely the future of the web and it is a shame, that MSIE is not supporting it. The most annoying thing is, that IE 6.0 does not understand the MIME type application/xhtml+xml, I have to write code that detects IE and then delivers text/html for this single browser.

    BTW: Every modern web browser handles XHTML correct (Mozilla/Firefox/Camino/Netscape7, Opera, Safari/Konqueror) – it is a shame that MSIE does not, but I can understand that, because MSIE is far away from being a modern web browser…

    –Thomas

  6. Anonymous says:

    Konqueror does not support XHTML. It mistakenly treats application/xhtml+xml as tag soup.

  7. Anonymous says:

    "asks"? yuck. Let’s go back to "requests" shall we?