Here’s the new advertising vehicle for monster.com….I mean the recruiting newsletter from Fast Company


Here’s the link for FastCompany’s new hiring newsletter, which I receive via introductory e-mail today (e-mail came from fastcompany.com). I had to look at the url a couple a times to make sure I was in the right place. Hmm, let’s see, silly monster logo, chief monster making a silly face, sign up for monster.com here. Not quite sure what about this is FastCompany. But I do know I don’t like it…it seems kind of dishonest and insulting. I hope FastCompany enjoys the advertising revenue that they just made off of this, because they’ve lot my attention completely (which will take some unsubscribing now). 

Bottom line: if you brand something a certain way and it turns out to be something different, you’ve lost the trust of your audience.

Comments (8)

  1. Steve Shu says:

    Yeah. I guess I’m confused too. Had to do a quadruple take. Is Monster just trying to brand through FastCompany’s content on how you hire for fast-moving companies?

  2. Nathan says:

    After looking at it, I’m not sure whether this is a magazine site with a Monster sponsorship or Monster site with two magazine sponsors. OK, I can tell by the Gruner + Jahr copyright at the bottom, but how many visitors will check that closely?

    Based on logo placements, it looks like Monster. If it’s supposed to be a magazine site, serving both Fast Company (http://hiring.fastcompany.com/) and Inc. (http://hiring.inc.com/), they shouldn’t have sold the naming rights to another publisher.

  3. Heather, thanks for the feedback. As a monthly contributor to the site, I’m dismayed — but I’d rather hear it now :-)

  4. Heather says:

    Johanna-the work of the contributors looks great ; ) Too bad they messed it up with all those ads!

  5. Ed Adkins says:

    I’m not sure why you’re taking the stance that it’s a failure. Even at first glance it just seems like a partnering of their resources. I think that especially on the web that’s common enough not to confuse/mislead anyone.

  6. Heather says:

    I didn’t say it was a failure…it may be very successful for monster, specifically. It is misleading because it came from Fast Company but when you look at it it’s all Monster.

  7. Henry says:

    This is called ‘whitebox or private labelling’…

  8. Johnson says:

    It looks like they are still trying to recover from the "Talent Lab" bust at Fast Company. Why do company continue to mess around with their good brand and confuse their loyal customers? Why not just stay good at what you do and focus on being better? Too bad we live in an all you can eat, be all you can be to everyone society. My 2 cents…