Blogs and Recruiting…seems to me there is some confusion


Workforce.com recently published an article on blogs and recruiting. I gotta say that posting jobs to a web site run by someone else that includes advertisements is not my idea of blogging. What makes a blog a blog? I think it's run by one person or a small number of people (that are visible) that generate their own opinions and link to other content. Because we blog as individuals, the idea of corporate sponsorship concerns me a little. Just because a website calls itself a blog doesn't mean it's a blog. <my opinion...read my disclaimer>.


The personal presence that is mentioned in the article as a benefit of blogging just doesn't come through in some of these advertiser sponsored “blogs” (the person should be central to the blog).


In the article, Steven Rothberg of collegerecruiter.com, asks how much more revenue is generated by the content relative to the cost of keeping the blogs up. Then he asks why we (Microsoft) are doing it. OK, so I'll answer that question. ..


First, this is not only not costing my group money to do, I see it as the best tool I have right now to do a major part of my job, which is to build community around marketing at Microsoft. Frankly, this is free to me and my organization and I am thankful that I work for a company that invests in tools and technologies that help us reach out to our customers directly. Second, we are a technology company and I feel it's our responsibility to use technology to do our jobs, whether it's our technology or our vendors'. I don't measure the value of blogging in revenues though (what can I say...HR is a cost center and blogging isn't “costing” me anything). The time I spend here blogging is time I would spend reaching out to the tech marketing community anyway, but would probably be doing less efficiently without a  blog presence (and also, it's fun and interesting...let's hear it for job satisfaction). I have great candidates in process that have resulted from blogging, I have had numerous opportunities to engage with professional organizations and industry leaders. I've received many positive comments from viewers of this blog and feel like I am helping drive a better understanding of the marketing discipline at Microsoft and our corporate culture. In my mind, that is priceless.


Personally, I think blogging is going to change the way companies recruit (with people at the company blogging and also recruiters seeking out bloggers). The Internet will be the new job posting and resume database. New models will have to be developed for some service oriented business in the staffing space. It's possible that job boards will have to create new value propositions. They biggest ones have done a good job of evolving with the times anyway. But the cost to produce and publish content (like job descriptions) through blogs will be so low that companies will embrace blogging and recruiters will be differentiated in the market place by the strength of their content, knowledge of industry and responsiveness. Just my prediction (and opinion). Feel free to come back here and check in months down the road if I am wrong.


 

Comments (10)

  1. Balaji Ravindran says:

    Your points pertain to just recruiting. Weblogs from my opinion is someone’s public personal space on the web, where one can write anything his/her feelings, and others can see that and provide feedback. This in turn could initiate sharing ideas, but not necessarily.

  2. Balaji Ravindran says:

    Down the road, I feel you can cut recruiting costs by posting job opening here itself. I guess you’ve a lot of visitors who in turn is connected to many. Blogs do help recruiting.

  3. As a life sciences recruiter I couldn’t agree more with you Heather…I read the article too…I’ve only been blogging a short time and have had a great response to my blog from candidates primarily although I’d really been writing for my client audience. Thanks to my small following so far – I’m starting another blog for candidates.

    I do think blogs are meant to be very targeted and written for a specific audience. It’s not supposed to be for everyone..that’s the point.

    I’ve not been a big fan or supporter of the job boards for years now and find blogging to be much more effective anyway.

    Keep writing and we’ll all keep reading!

    best, Lucia

    HireWorks, Inc.

    http://www.askhireworks.com

    http://www.hire-works-forhire.com

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  5. Heather,

    The link in your entry to the Workforce article is broken so I can’t be sure to which article you’re referring, but if it is the article that I think you’re referring then I assure you that we are on the same page about blogs.

    My question about the revenue model for blogs was not an indictment against all blogs. Instead, it was a question that should be asked of all business decisions: will it produce a net increase in income? If not, then even though it is fun or cool, it isn’t an appropriate use of the employer’s resources.

    Your blog, for example, is a great recruiting tool and it also generates great publicity for Microsoft. If I were your boss (you should be so thankful that I’m not), I would be totally supportive of your blogging efforts. But I would also have a real problem with others who blog on company time because they often write on matters that are interest only to them and do nothing to increase their employer’s net income.

    I am a fan of blogging and have been since I was able to understand how they could make business sense. In fact, my blog just won two awards from Recruiting.com (see http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com/weblog/archives/2005/12/collegerecruite.php”>http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com/weblog/archives/2005/12/collegerecruite.php ).

    Steven Rothberg, President and Founder

    CollegeRecruiter.com job board

    http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com

  6. Heather,

    The link in your entry to the Workforce article is broken so I can’t be sure to which article you’re referring, but if it is the article that I think you’re referring then I assure you that we are on the same page about blogs.

    My question about the revenue model for blogs was not an indictment against all blogs. Instead, it was a question that should be asked of all business decisions: will it produce a net increase in income? If not, then even though it is fun or cool, it isn’t an appropriate use of the employer’s resources.

    Your blog, for example, is a great recruiting tool and it also generates great publicity for Microsoft. If I were your boss (you should be so thankful that I’m not), I would be totally supportive of your blogging efforts. But I would also have a real problem with others who blog on company time because they often write on matters that are interest only to them and do nothing to increase their employer’s net income.

    I am a fan of blogging and have been since I was able to understand how they could make business sense. In fact, my blog just won two awards from Recruiting.com (see http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com/weblog/archives/2005/12/collegerecruite.php”>http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com/weblog/archives/2005/12/collegerecruite.php ).

    Steven Rothberg, President and Founder

    CollegeRecruiter.com job board

    http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com

  7. Heather forwarded Zo&#235; and me the link to a recent article in Workforce Management Magazine entitled &#8220; Blogs: A New Frontier in Online Recruiting .&#8221; In the article, writer Susan Ladika explores the use of weblogs as a new trend in creative

  8. Heather forwarded Zo&#235; and me the link to a recent article in Workforce Management Magazine entitled &#8220; Blogs: A New Frontier in Online Recruiting .&#8221; In the article, writer Susan Ladika explores the use of weblogs as a new trend in creative

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