The Next Chapter–Microsoft and digital technologies in health and healthcare delivery

\ When I joined Microsoft in September of 2002 I never dreamed I’d be writing this blog post in January of 2016. Of course in 2002 HealthBlog didn’t exist. HealthBlog wasn’t born until October of 2005. Since then, I’ve posted more than 800 articles about digital tech in health and healthcare.  I came to Microsoft after…

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A secret shopper’s perspectives on the EHR and clinical workflow

As someone who has practiced medicine using both paper and electronic records, and someone who’s been focused on the health tech scene for the past 20 years, you might think I’ve seen it all. Indeed, during my 35 year career in medicine and tech I’ve traveled the world and learned a lot about healthcare, clinical practice and the intersection…

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Setting aside differences and embracing what connects us

It really is a new day at Microsoft. I cannot emphasize how much things have changed. A significant part of my job at the company is doing what we call executive engagement. At our beautiful briefing center in Redmond, Washington, and at other locations around the world, I meet with customers to review Microsoft’s value proposition in health and the healthcare…

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Modernizing Communication and Collaboration in Healthcare

When I started my career at Microsoft nearly 14 years ago, I dreamed of the day when technology could deliver a total communication and collaboration solution for healthcare. Over the last decade I’ve observed pieces of that dream come together as information technology matured. It started with gradually improved technologies to deliver rich audio and video over internal and…

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Reinventing and moving beyond the EHR. The proof is all around us.

HealthITNews reports that at least one popular EHR vendor (eClinicalWorks) is launching the flagship version of its cloud service solution by saying, “Don’t call it an EHR”. Perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised by that as the latest EHR satisfaction survey from the AMA and Medscape shows that while EHR adoption by physicians has surpassed 80 percent, clinician satisfaction…

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Health Information Exchange (HIE). A recipe that just might work.

If there is anything that plagues the health industry and severely damages the value proposition for information technology in healthcare, it is the dismal failure to achieve system interoperability and perhaps more importantly, health information exchange. No matter how elegant an individual clinic’s or hospitals’ or health system’s electronic health record solution might be, the value of the patient data these systems capture…

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EHR satisfaction survey; reading between the lines and thinking about what’s next

It was with a bit of my own satisfaction that I read today’s HealthcareITNews report on their new user survey of EHR satisfaction. The survey of 396 individual users of 9 major EHR vendors examines metrics of user satisfaction including visual appearance, ease of use, interoperability with medical devices, interoperability with other clinical systems, interoperability with billing systems,…

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After the EMR. The technologies that will truly transform healthcare and clinical workflow.

Last week, Healthcare IT News editor Mike Miliard wrote a piece that might have escaped your attention. He offered up 18 health technologies poised for big growth based on data from HIMSS Analytics. While none of the technologies listed are quite as sexy as robotics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence, I’d say they are spot on with regard…

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Improving health and healthcare, a global perspective

If you live in America and work in the healthcare industry it is easy to assume that the issues we face in providing care to our population are uniquely American. While it is true that we spend more per capita on healthcare than other nations, and many would argue that we spend too much for…

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The rise of the machines in healthcare. What it portends for clinicians and other workers.

This morning I came across an interesting article by Jason Hiner on ZDNet. The article, When robots eliminate jobs, humans will find better things to do, examines how innovation and new technologies have disrupted jobs throughout history. It makes the case, be it in farming or the manufacture of automobiles, that while disruption in the workforce does happen and some people do suffer…

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