Microsoft welcomes Government’s Innovation Policy

Microsoft today welcomed the Turnbull Government’s Innovation Statement that proposes around 20 new measures to accelerate Australia’s innovation ecosystem to ensure Australia can remain globally competitive. “I am delighted to see this package of policies and reforms because a comprehensive suite of measures will be required if we are going to be able to compete…


Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights Unveiled in the US

At the recent Cloud Summit in Canberra the issue of consumer data privacy and empowerment, data transfers and the flow of information across borders were hot topics. Ultimately without consumer trust in the operation of cloud based services and the Internet overall, and the operation of a global service delivery system the opportunities promised by…


Politics and Technology Forum – Openness and Transparency in Politics

Last week (1 June), Microsoft Australia supported by Open Forum, hosted its third Politics & Technology Forum at Parliament House Canberra, attended by public servants, political bloggers, representatives from political parties and the media. The Forum, hosted by Mark Pesce, Inventor, writer, educator, and broadcaster, was keynoted by Iain Dale, leading UK political blogger and…

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Federal Government releases National Digital Economy Strategy

The Federal Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy Senator Stephen Conroy this morning released the Federal Government’s National Digital Economy Strategy. The Strategy is the product of over 18 months work by the Minister’s Department. It articulates the Government’s vision for Australia’s digital economy. By defining eight “Digital Economy Goals” the Strategy aims…

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Politics & Technology

(Cross posted from OpenForum.com.au) I’m delighted to have been invited to visit Australia in June to be the keynote speaker at The Microsoft Australia Politics and Technology Forum. I am highly political but completely untechnological, and yet I am regarded as being at the forefront of political technology in Britain; purely because over the last…

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Do we trust the internet?

Technology and politics is more interwoven than ever before. We’ve seen sensitive government information being revealed on Wikileaks, and mobilisation of communities across the Middle East using social media resulting in regime change in Tunisia, Egypt and unrest in Libya and Bahrain. The first social media election in the UK saw an incoming Conservative Coalition…

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Leaders could face up to voters with a full web debate

Cross posted from The Punch We are all familiar with the television debates between the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition that occur in the lead up to a Federal election – but are Australians ready for online election debates? Last month, NSW held what was billed as the first election debate on Twitter…

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Data Online – it can be so

Lindsay Tanner’s Taskforce 2.0 are getting down to the hard yards of working through how to democratically engage Australia’s public in the cause of more open government. In the way of all collective activity I can imagine they will have a few teething issues to sort through. Some will be administrative, others of a policy…

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Australian Trial – Digital Democracy

Let me be honest – I titled this blog ‘Digital Democracy” not because I wanted to discuss that subject particularly but rather to get more attention on the web through the search engines. My digital media friends have a few tricks. Such is the reality of a world of mass information. Underlying this ruse lies…

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Culture Change – A Web 2 Far?

Yesterday’s announcement by Finance Minister Lindsay Tanner and Special Minister of State, Senator Joe Ludwig, of a taskforce to investigate how the Australian Government can use new ‘Web 2.0’ approaches to expand the uses of Commonwealth information and improve the way government consults and engages with citizens could one day be seen as the moment…

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