LightSwitch How To: Change the Currency Symbol for Money

In this short blog, you will learn how to change the currency symbol for in your Microsoft® Visual Studio® LightSwitch™ 2011 application. By default, the currency of the Money data type is set to dollar sign, for the English version of VS Lightswitch. But how can we change the currency to other currency symbols, for…


Pitfalls of Chinese Conversion (Part 2)

We have talked about Kernel32.dll and its LCMapString API in the previous entry. In addition, I have shown you how to use the API to convert Simplified Chinese character to Traditional Chinese character or vice versa with sample codes provided. If we perform a simple test on LCMapString API, we may find the limitation of…

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LightSwitch How To: Change the Run-Time Language

Microsoft Visual Studio LightSwitch 2011 was released in a limited set of languages, but the runtime is localized in more than 40 languages, namely: Arabic, Basque, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English (United States), Estonian, Finish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish,…


WR Series: What’s New in Globalization in .NET Framework 4

This episode touches on the new characteristics, changes, and improvements in the .NET Framework 4 regarding Globalization. Topics include Cultures, String Management, Neutral Cultures, and a set of tips and tricks to help you develop robust international applications.   Andy Gonzalez, PM in the Developer Division’s Globalization team, will introduce you to these concepts in…


Silverlight: Arabic Reversed?

Microsoft Silverlight is a cross-browser, cross-platform implementation of the .NET Framework for building rich interactive applications for the web. Support for Arabic and Bidi languages did not come for free. Microsoft added Bidi support starting version 4 but before that, there was no “official” support for Bidi languages (for example, Arabic, Hebrew).  Today, thanks to…


Font Association (Part 1) – A Primer

Characters and GlyphsCharacters are the written symbols that we use to communicate ideas (e.g., N, 9, Θ, Π, 語, @). Glyphs are graphical representations of those characters.  Code pages are tables of characters and fonts are tables of glyphs. Unicode is designed to serve as a single code page for all characters. Because Unicode contains…


Introduction to Satellite Assemblies

A satellite assembly is a compiled library (DLL) that contains (“localizable”) resources such as strings, bitmaps, etc. You are likely to use them when creating a multilingual (UI) application. Satellite assemblies provide you with the capability of designing and deploying your solution to multiple cultures, rather than hard coding strings, bitmaps, etc., into your main…

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Diacritics, Accents, Tashkeel

So what are diacritics anyway? Diacritic is a mark typically used in combination with another character. These are sometimes called ‘accents’, in Latin, for example, “â” the mark on top of the “a” is a diacritic. In Hebrew and Arabic these are marks that denote vowels. In Arabic, these are also called ‘tashkeel’, for example…


Exploring Windows Locales and .NET Cultures

The term Locale is often misunderstood by developers creating international software for the Windows platform.  Some of the confusion arises from the fact that there are several different locales to choose from.  This blog post defines Locale and explains the different locales available in Windows. The concept of a .NET Culture is also defined here,…


Start Building an International Application for Windows Phone 7 (Part 1)

Most of you may have experience developing applications which can support different UI languages for different language speakers. For this topic, I am going to demonstrate how to create a simple international application for Windows Phone 7 by separating localizable resources from code to create language-specific resource files and also show how the culture fallback…

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