JLCA 3.0 – CORBA – Dealing with Other Languages


Since JLCA only converts Java applications and Java CORBA support is targeted through .NET Remoting, server and/or client applications written in other languages are not be converted entirely. Usually, a converted application could require extensive user-intervention to adapt the .NET Remoting application to the multi-language environment commonly seen in CORBA applications. Table 13  discusses possible scenarios behind Java applications using CORBA and suggests how to deal with converted applications.


 











CORBA


Scenario


A Non Java Server


If there is a CORBA server which is not written in Java with Java and non Java clients. JLCA can convert the Java clients into .NET Remoting clients.


However, it would be necessary to build a proxy application behaving as a bridge between .NET Remoting and CORBA. Such application would act as a Remoting server and a CORBA client. It listens to .NET Remoting requests and converts them into CORBA requests.


A Java Server


If there is a CORBA server written in Java with Java and non Java clients. JLCA can convert the Java server, object implementations and clients into .NET Remoting.


However, to let non-java clients to connect through .NET Remoting, it would be necessary to build a proxy application behaving as a bridge between CORBA and .NET Remoting. Such an application would act as a Remoting server and a CORBA client. It would listen to CORBA requests and would convert them into .NET Remoting.


Table 13: CORBA Conversion Scenarios


 


The suggested bridge application takes the advantage of the fact that servers and clients can be written in C++ and this language is fully supported by .NET Framework. Note that in both the above scenarios, the proxy approach is just a temporary solution. As soon as a third-party .NET solution is provided for the involved languages, the bridge will turn impractical. Table 14 summarizes the main advantages and disadvantages of the proxy-like application:


 



















Advantages


Disadvantages


A great workaround for the unconverted features and they can continue working


Mixed architecture: CORBA and .NET Remoting instead of 100% .NET Remoting


CORBA and .NET Remoting applications can work together


A bridge adds a level of indirection.


Unconverted code remains unchanged


 


Proxy generation is relatively easy


 


Table 14: An Analysis for a Schema Involving a Bridge Application

Comments (3)

  1. JLCA 3.0 — это такое средство для конверсии кода Java в код C#, причём таким обр

  2. As I promised, I have posted the JLCA 3.0 cheat sheet for the users on my Blogs. The aim of this exercise…

  3. As I promised, I have posted the JLCA 3.0 cheat sheet for the users on my Blogs. The aim of this exercise…

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