Using RSCA to help you understand what your IIS server requests are doing

RSCA – an acronym for Runtime Service and Control API is a little know and little talked about feature of the IIS server starting with now obsolete version 7.0 (which came with Windows 2008 Server). This feature can provide real time snapshots of what is going on inside the IIS worker process without impacting performance…

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IIS web-servers running in Windows Azure may reveal their private IP for certain requests.

Internet Information Services (the handy web-server from Microsoft) runs on Windows server OS but also in the Microsoft Azure Cloud. If you are building virtual machines and deploying them to the cloud (IAAS – Infrastructure as a Service) or using Cloud Services from Windows Azure (PAAS – Platform as a Service), you will basically be…

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IIS with URL Rewrite as a reverse proxy – part 2 – dealing with 500.52 status codes

This is the second article in a three-part series of articles dealing with setting up IIS as a reverse proxy. Check out part one here. IIS acting as reverse proxy: Where the problems start: Testing this new setup for basic scenarios may work, but you can also be presented with a couple of issues. The…

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Setup IIS with URL Rewrite as a reverse proxy for real world apps.

Url Rewrite, one of the many modules that can be added on to the IIS web-server to make this a very versatile tool can be used to perform a variety of tasks, including allowing you to setup your IIS web-server as a reverse-proxy server to some other back-end HTTP service. A reverse proxy is a…

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Disabling TLS 1.0 on your Windows 2008 R2 server – just because you still have one

Windows 2008 R2 server is a very popular distribution of Windows that has been used time and time again to power servers running ASP.net websites – either on the Internet or on Intranets. Although this Windows version has somewhat aged from 8 years ago, I still tend to see quite a lot of these installs…

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Debugging your custom FTP authentication provider module

If you are reading this article, I will make the assumption that you already know that in Microsoft FTP server that comes with IIS 7.5 or above, you have three possibilities for authentication: Anonymous: you let all users in without requiring credentials from their side Basic Authentication: users have to provide a username and password…

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