What to do if you have a crash

This post is designed to give a simple set of steps to follow if you ever have a crash situation and you’re not sure how to troubleshoot it. To identify the cause of a crash the most important piece of evidence or log is a memory dump file – you need to set something up before…

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Using AXC file for AX client.

If you are editing an AX 4.0/2009 configuration file (.axc) and adding new configuration values at the end of the file, please ensure to enter a new line (CR+LF), so that the last line entered can be read when it is being used. Text on the last line ending without a carriage return is ignored.  …

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Running AX2009 batches with a recurrence of 1 minute

So the issue here is setting a batch job to run with a recurrence of 1 minute in AX2009 – a server bound batch job. The job itself takes just a few seconds but the batch job isn’t completing for a few minutes, and so the next run doesn’t happen after 1 minute, it happens…

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So your AOS crashed, is hanging, or you just want to see what it’s doing

Ever been in a situation where your AOS crashed? And all you had to show for it was a lousy event log message 1000 which didn’t tell you anything except that it crashed? Or perhaps you’ve just wanted to see what your AOS is actually running at a given moment in time? It could be very useful…

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Finding the AX user and the X++ call stack from a memory dump the easy way

******** Latest update 11-July-2011 ******** Scripts now allow class and table name resolution ******** This post explains how to find the AX user and the X++ call stack that caused an AOS crash – by using special scripts for WinDbg – before reaching this stage you need to first have captured a memory dump, and then…

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Finding the X++ call stack that caused a crash

This post explains how to find the X++ call stack that caused an AOS crash – before reaching this stage you need to first have captured a memory dump, and then set up WinDbg ready to do some analysis, we have posts which explain both of those steps: Capturing memory dumps: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/emeadaxsupport/archive/2010/05/12/possibilities-to-create-memory-dumps-from-crashing-processes.aspx Setting up WinDbg:…

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Finding the AX user that caused an AOS crash

This post explains how to find the ax user that caused an AOS crash – before reaching this stage you need to first have captured a memory dump, and then set up WinDbg ready to do some analysis, we have posts which explain both of those steps: Capturing memory dumps: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/emeadaxsupport/archive/2010/05/12/possibilities-to-create-memory-dumps-from-crashing-processes.aspx Setting up WinDbg:  http://blogs.msdn.com/b/emeadaxsupport/archive/2011/04/10/setting-up-windbg-and-using-symbols.aspx…

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Setting up WinDbg and Using Symbols

Once you have collected a dump file, to analyse it you need to use a tool called WinDbg. In this post I am going to explain how to set up WinDbg so it’s ready to debug a memory dump taken from a Dynamics AX process. If you’re not sure how to create a dump file,…

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Can I install just the kernel part of a rollup

Yes you can. It is perfectly acceptable (and supported) to install just the kernel part of a rollup, so you can for example have your application version on 5.0.1000.52 (original SP1) or perhaps 5.0.1500.2985 (rollup 5) and have the kernel version on anything above 5.0.1000.52, such as 5.0.1500.3761 (rollup 6), or maybe something even newer!…

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How batch processing works under the hood AX2009

In this article I am going to explain how batch processing in AX2009 works, I don’t mean how to set up a batch group or any of that kind of thing that you find in the manual, what I mean is what each AOS is doing in the background to decide how and when to pick up…

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