This blog has moved… notice #2…

For various reasons, the biggest being my desire to play around with .Text, I’ve moved my blog to my own server at http://blogs.duncanmackenzie.net/duncanma following the 3 leaf model when they moved, I thought I should post this notice a couple of times…

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“Express Paint” article up…

This article, by John Kennedy, discusses the creation of an image editing application completely built with C# Express Edition.ExpressPaintSummary: Use C# Express to create an image processing application that’s ideal for putting the final touch to your digital photographs. This program is easy to expand with your own unique touches. (6 printed pages)Enjoy!

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Luke Hoban blogs on…

Luke, a PM on the C# IDE team has started a blog… should be a good source of info, especially around the new Express Edition. Intro + C# Express … The project that I’ve been working on for most of my time at Microsoft is the Visual C# Express Edition.  So as you can probably…

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Eric Gunnerson discusses grouping classes within an assembly…

As a big fan of components, my applications are often composed of many different assemblies… essentially I break out anything that seems ‘ready to reuse’… but perhaps I should reconsider? Grouping classes in an assembly This useful bit of information crossed my desk today: When it comes to packaging in separate assemblies, remember that you…

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Andy Pennell and Scott Nonnenberg are looking for your opinion…

Debugger Window Menu Items: Where should they be?The VS debugger since 7.0 has put most debugger windows on the Debug menu, under the Windows sub-menu. I say ‘most’ because the Output window lives on the View menu, under Other Windows sub-menu. Where do you expect debugger windows to be on the menu? (Ignore Output for…

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Greggm describes how to debug ASP.NET as a non-admin…

For most folks working with ASP.NET, this should be taken as essential information… Don’t let the Whidbey reference in the first paragraph fool you, by the way, this post describes how to accomplish debugging as a non-admin in Visual Studio .NET 2003. Debugging an ASP.NET application as a non-admin The debugger team has gotten many…

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Cyrus ruminates on the revelations of TechEd 2004…

Cyrus, recent addition to the C# bloggers list and poster of many posts, has been blogging extensively from TechEd… OMGTHXURGR8!!!! That’s basically the message we got today concerning the work we’re doing in the C# IDE for VS 2005. I ended up not being able to show people the new stuff on a person by…

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So many posts in so little time…

Cyrus (a developer with the C# IDE team) has obviously needed to blog for awhile, and when he finally did, he had a lot of material ready to go. Check out his 28 posts from the last 2 days! Here’s his first post: First blog entry A couple of week ago I worked with Jay…

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SteveJS discusses unmanaged/managed and mixed debugging in VS

Steve Steiner, a developer on the VS debugger team, fills us in on some of the differences between the different types of debugging that VS is capable of… Unmanaged Debugging vs. Managed Debugging vs. Mixed Debugging. All versions of VS support debugging both managed and unmanaged code. However there is a big difference between doing…

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