Getting the registry through Powershell..

Just one more quick line to plug into DCM..  (plus a few powershell links which might be useful) Returning a value set in the registry.  For example if you optimise the TCPWindowSize in a CCR environment you can use the following in DCM to verify that the values are set correctly as per your design. …


Powershell, DPM and Virtualisation – some great blogs…

Powershell Explore Your [Environment] on the Windows Powershell blog, written by Jeff Snover.  The article takes a bit of reading but has a great walk through of using Powershell to invoke the System.Environment .Net class.  For example: “[Datetime]::Today Saturday, December 13, 2008 12:00:00 AM” And: “foreach ($f in [Enum]::GetValues([System.Environment+SpecialFolder])) {"{0,-20} – {1}" -f $f, [Environment]::GetFolderPath($f)…


..a few more bits of Powershell to feed into DCM

Following on from my DCM blog last month here are a few more bits of Powershell that can be fed into DCM… Checking Autodatabasemountdial: $server=hostname $cmsobj=Get-MailboxServer | Where-Object { $_.RedundantMachines -contains $server }$cmsname=$cmsobj.name $return=(Get-MailboxServer -id:$cmsname).autodatabasemountdial Write-host $return Checking a few of the disclaimer settings are correctly configured: $return=(get-transportrule -id "External Disclaimer").state write-host $return $return=(get-transportrule -id…


Want to check if your Exchange servers are configured how you designed them to be configured?

Then DCM, or Configuration Manager 2007 Desired Configuration Management to give it it’s full title, could be the way to go… It’s part of the System Centre suite of products [SCCM] and it appears to be a really useful bit of software. You effectively create configuration items and can populate these using Powershell (which makes…