Moving on

I’m over 2 months late in writing this post. please forgive me for the delay, especially those of you who were nice enough to leave comments and questions and expected a response.    This is my last posting on my “Typed XML” blog. After almost 9 years at Microsoft I felt the need to do…

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Silent XQuery failures

A newsgroup post I read earlier today reminded me that there are cases where failure to get the expected result when using XQuery can sometimes be difficult to diagnose. Here’s what the poster was doing declare @xml xml set @xml = ‘<root><test></test></root>’ set @xml.modify(‘replace value of (/root/test/text())[1] with “test new value”‘) select @xml This user…

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Stardust memories

The famous Stardust hotel and casino was torn down today. I was fond of the place since this was the hotel I stayed at when I first visited Vegas in the mid nineties. During our most recent trip to Nevada last summer my wife and I made sure we stopped by to bid farewell to…

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Mixed content (part 3)

It’s been a few weeks since my last post about mixed content so let’s pick up right where we left off. This time we will look at DML operations on mixed content.  We’ll keep using the XML schema as well as the table I created in the first post of this series.   Let’s insert…

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A new SQL CLR blog

One of my colleagues, Brad Richards just started blogging about SQL CLR performance. If you use SQL CLR I strongly suggest that you take a look at this blog. Brad is very knowledgeable about performance and you’re likely to learn some very valuable information.

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Mixed content (part 2)

Following last week’s introduction to the concept of mixed content, let’s look in detail at a validated XML instance with mixed content.   Taking a look at the children nodes of the <letter> element   Let’s reuse the instance we stored in our table last time. We can query it and look at all the nodes under…

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Mixed content (part 1 of many)

I started working on this two days ago. I quickly realized that when I’m done I’ll most likely have material for multiple posts. My original plan was to finish the article in the next few days, and then publish it as several posts over time. However I eventually decided to start posting now, while the work is…

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xsi:nil magic (part 2/2)

Last time we looked at what happens to the xsi:nil attributes when replacing the value of a simply typed element. In this post, we’re going to look at complex types. First let’s create a schema collection with complex types and elements. CREATE XML SCHEMA COLLECTION SCnil_cplx AS ‘   <xs:schema xmlns:xs=”http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema” targetNamespace=”urn:nil” xmlns=”urn:nil”>        …

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xsi:nil magic (part 1/2)

A few months ago I wrote a post about the interesting behavior of the xsi:type attribute. Today we’re going to look at his no so distant relative xsi:nil. But first let’s do a quick recap. Any element can be made nillable by adding the attribute nillable=”true” to its declaration. Practically it means that this element…

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About my article in SQL Server Standard Magazine

In my previous post I mentioned the article I wrote for the September issue of SQL Server Standard Magazine. I heard of one person who was having trouble running the code samples from the article. When I received my copy of the magazine I realized the font the article was printed in made it hard…

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