SigParse uploaded to MSDN Code Gallery

A while back I posted some sample code written by Rico Mariani to parse CLR metadata signatures.  This code is now also available on the MSDN Code Gallery SigParse page.  If any of you were nervous about incorporating that source into your product without an official license agreement, please take a look at the MSDN…

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Profilers, in-process side-by-side CLR instances, and a free test harness

My previous post on New stuff in Profiling API for upcoming CLR 4.0 mentioned that any profiler that implements ICorProfilerCallback3 must be “side-by-side aware”.  This post goes into more detail on how to do this, and how to test it. What are in-process side-by-side CLR instances? To understand this fully, take a look at this…

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CLR V4: Profiler Detach

I described how profilers may attach to already-running processes in some previous posts (#1 and #2).  In this post I’m writing about how profilers that are already loaded may detach from a running process before that process exits.  Like Profiler Attach, this is a new feature available starting with CLR V4. The Detach feature allows…

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Generics and Your Profiler

If you’re writing a profiler that you expect to run against CLR 2.0 or greater, you probably care about generics. Whether you’re reporting call stacks or instrumenting code, it’s possible the users of your profiler wrote some of that code using generic types. And if not, it’s still quite likely they used generic types from…

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Writing a Profiler for Silverlight 4

The Silverlight 4 beta has been released a while ago (see this), and one of the new features in Silverlight 4 is the ability to use the very same profiling API that is available for regular CLR-based apps (referred to as “desktop” CLR apps).  In this post I’ll talk about how to create a profiler…

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CLR V4: Profiler Attach Part 2: Ok, now what?

In a previous post, I outlined to all you profiler writers how to modify your profiler so it can attach to running processes, and what sorts of limitations your profiler will have when it attaches.  In this post, I answer the question, “My profiler is attached.  What should it do next?” Catch Up A profiler…

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CLR V4: Stuff That May Break Your Profiler

When CLR V2 came out, we made a big decision.  If your profiler has not been upgraded for V2 (i.e., if your profiler does not support ICorProfilerCallback2), then the CLR will not allow your profiler to run.  Why?  CLR V2 had some radical differences from V1.  Generics is a great example.  There were also some…

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