I’m leaving my position as IE platform Group Program Manager…


…HA!  Gotcha!


I’ve been juggling multiple roles on the IE team for a while.  With the release of IE7, I decided (with my management’s support, of course) to focus my energy on the design of the IE web developer platform as the lead platform architect, rather than managing the platform program management team as group program manager.  This means I won’t have anyone reporting to me, but will oversee the design of the entire IE platform from the perspective of web developers.


Obviously (since I chose it) I’m excited by this opportunity; I’ll have more time to focus on the big picture of our platform and how the pieces fit together.  I’m going to be sad not to manage people for a while, since I really enjoy helping my teammates develop their careers (though of course I will continue to do this through mentoring).  However, I’m very pleased that my cohort Doug Stamper will be taking over the management of the core of the IE platform program management.  Doug and I have worked together for a couple of years now, and there’s no one I could be more comfortable working with or to whom I would be more confident handing over my people management responsibilities.


Note that this is a bit different job than the usual Microsoft “Software Architect” position – I’m focusing on designing the platform that web devs use on IE, not designing our own codebase.  I will remain in the Program Management team, and though I expect I’ll be poking my nose in the code more often to understand some things better, I won’t be directly responsible for coding duties – we have a couple of great Software Architects and a great dev team who are much better at that than I am.  I’m still working out exactly what this position will mean, of course.  (For the curious, this isn’t a promotion or a demotion – in fact, I don’t know (or much care) if my official title will change or not, either.)


So rest assured – this doesn’t mean you’ll see less of me, or that I will have less of an effect on the IE team as a whole – likely quite the opposite.  I will continue to speak publicly, and hopefully will get to blog more often, etc.


-Chris

Comments (19)

  1. Jerry Mead says:

    "I won’t have anyone reporting to me"

    This is a very understandable response to being dunked in the fountain by your current reports:-)

  2. cwilso says:

    Oh, I imagine I’m going in the fountain next time too.  In fact, given the lack of managerial threats to hold over people, I expect I’m going in multiple times.  :)

  3. Jack says:

    re: "I’m focusing on designing the platform that web devs use on IE, not designing our own codebase."

    I read this as;

    "I’ll be looking at how web developers use IE, and not the internal workings of IE itself.  This will mean that I will be approaching IE, with the ‘eyes’ of our clients, looking at how the support for better, more complete and spec compliant CSS and DOM standards is so very critical to the success of the IE platform.  Best of all, as a {insertNewTitleHere}, I will actually have influence over how these issues get raised with the various development teams, and thus may actually have some success getting these fixes into the product, ASAP."

    If I am reading you correctly, then BANG ON! can’t wait, and congrats on your new role!

    If I am reading you wrong, then I’m not sure how you are helping the future of IE, and Web Development in general?

    Jack

  4. cwilso says:

    That’s actually spot-on, yes.

  5. Joe says:

    So, will you be able to share anything about what the FF team hinted at – moving the JScript under the .net runtime engine?

    Also, how about using all or part of WPF as the rendering and layout manager to replace Trident.  

    Do you think ie has gotten to the stage where the code base has an agility problem?  Especially if you need to retain backward compatibility with multiple versions.

  6. Ed Burnette says:

    Instead of spending tons of time and energy bringing the rendering engine up to standards, would it be an option to embed a 3rd party engine such as gecko or opera and base IE-next on that?

  7. Mike Dimmick says:

    Mary Jo Foley says you "[…] also noted that one of the most commonly requested IE features — the ability to run side-by-side versions of IE on the same machine — is not trivial. […]

    "We (IE) are a set of system DLLs that are used by other parts of the system, so this makes it really hard," Wilson said. "We are trying to figure out how to make IE capable of this in the future."

    For IE 7.0 I suggested that you used side-by-side assemblies, in the same way that the shell Common Controls v6 does, to isolate your changes to your own browser, but still allow third-party developers to opt in to the new components. The hard part, I imagine, is ensuring that the browser state is compatible; keeping different sets of favorites, cookies, and now feeds, would be confusing to the user. Using the same cache folder between two versions of the browser would probably be less important, although it would be beneficial to reduce bandwidth requirements.

  8. SSiTE News says:

    While the Microsoft-sanctioned name of the next version of Internet Explorer (IE) is IE "Next", it seems it will likely be christened IE 8.0. That’s according to Chris Wilson, the new platform architect for IE. (IE-team veteran Wilson, until a few days

  9. Ethan Smith says:

    I tried to email you a couple times (I even used the email form on this site), but it gets rejected every time. Any ideas?

    Here’s what I get when I try…

    This is an automatically generated Delivery Status Notification.

    Delivery to the following recipients failed.

    ******@microsoft.com

  10. Alex Piner says:

    Saw your correction on Chris Messina’s blog.

    Curious if MS has any involvment in the Semantic Web Initiative.

  11. cwilso says:

    Cwilso@microsoft.com is my email address.

  12. What is a person supposed to do about existing applications that break when IE 7 is installed?

    Please read http://www.dotnetjunkies.com/WebLog/mwherman2000/archive/2007/01/06/183736.aspx

    Not impressed …tabs is not a good trade-off for broken backward compatbility

  13. Bill Higgins says:

    I have the same question as Ed, what would be MS’ stance re: moving off of the current IE rendering engine and on to something like Gecko?

  14. Garold says:

    Hi! Very nice content. Interesting how can you do all that? I’m trying to build my site, but have no success for now((.

  15. Alex M. says:

    I’m starting with my own site too. Great content. Thank You.

  16. bilgi yarışması says:

    I tried to email you a couple times (I even used the email form on this site), but it gets rejected every time. Any ideas?

  17. Webdesign says:

    I have the same question as Ed and Bill, what would be MS’ stance re: moving off of the current IE rendering engine and on to something like Gecko?

  18. Vista says:

    Mary Jo Foley says you "[…] also noted that one of the most commonly requested IE features — the ability to run side-by-side versions of IE on the same machine — is not trivial. […]

    "We (IE) are a set of system DLLs that are used by other parts of the system, so this makes it really hard," Wilson said. "We are trying to figure out how to make IE capable of this in the future."

    For IE 7.0 I suggested that you used side-by-side assemblies, in the same way that the shell Common Controls v6 does, to isolate your changes to your own browser, but still allow third-party developers to opt in to the new components. The hard part, I imagine, is ensuring that the browser state is compatible; keeping different sets of favorites, cookies, and now feeds, would be confusing to the user. Using the same cache folder between two versions of the browser would probably be less important, although it would be beneficial to reduce bandwidth requirements.

  19. medyum says:

    I have the same question as Ed, what would be MS’ stance re: moving off of the current IE rendering engine and on to something like Gecko?