Understanding Workflows


Introduction to Workflows

        Workflows within the FIM Portal are used in combination with Sync rules to build, manage, control, or manipulate data that. Prior to the FIM Portal any manipulation of data from one data source to be managed to or from another data source need Custom Rules Extensions that required an understanding of Visual Basics or C#, which often required onsite developers or 3rd party consultants that are often expensive and hard to come by. One of the many issues with having to use Rules Extensions to manage data was scalability, maintenance or troubleshooting. After the rules extensions are in place if a need arises where a change needs to be implemented it would once again require onsite developers or at that point someone with a basic knowledge of VB and or C# to understand the existing Rules Extension in order to make the necessary changes. The worst possible scenario is where a change is needed in the Rules Extension and the source code is nowhere to be found for one reason or another.  Workflows are used to perform a variety of different task which include but certainly not limited Notification when a specific action has taken place, Authorization when someone would like to make a change to a specific attribute, or actions such as completing a function on behalf of the user when a specific action has taken place. A combination of all these different task can be performed for any desired circumstance. In the end Workflows are put in place for automation of your environment as well as streamlining your organization’s processes. More importantly these workflows can be used to follow a specific standard such as naming conventions and applying appropriate permissions.

        Often when these steps are performed manually they are done incorrectly and not necessarily by incompetence but by common mistakes like Typos, or forgetfulness. Workflows by them-selves do nothing but when they are associated with an MPR (Management Policy Rule) they can be used to perform functions as mentioned previously. These same workflows can be associated with multiple MPR’s but it is important to understand what the workflows are doing and when they should be “Triggered” or “Applied”. If not properly planned and tested you could find yourself in a looping scenario where a workflow gets applied again and again because the action that the workflow performs is associated with a “trigger” that applies the workflow. For example if you have a workflow that builds a display name but the MPR that “triggers” the workflow is for multiple attribute such as Create and Modify First Name, Last Name, or Display Name than the very action being performed would build or modify the objects Display Name, which would cause the workflow to be triggered a second time where even if the 2nd result would build the same Display Name and there may not be a change its still wasted resources on your machine, and additional unnecessary SQL “Churn”. Other situations could exist where the workflow gets in an endless loop which would eventually slow your environment to a crawl. Bottom line is to be sure and test any and all workflows before they are put in production. 

 

Workflow Types

        When you first install the Forefront Identity Manager Portal you are given 3 Types to choose Each Workflow type having additional functions associated with that particular activity. Additionally there is a select Run On Policy Update which is used in conjunction with Transition Set MPR’s

 

The 3 Workflow Types

  1. Authentication
    • Lockout Gate
    • One-Time Password Email Gate
    • One-Time Password SMS Gate
    • Password Gat
    • QA Gate
  2. Authorization
    • Approval
    • Filter Validation
    • Function Evaluator
    • Group Validation
    • Notification
    • Requestor Validation
  3. Action
    • Active Directory Password Reset Activity
    • Function Evaluator
    • Notification
    • Synchronization Rule Activity

 

Working with the Default Workflow library

        The following information is directly from the following Link. (References TechNet Article http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff800820(v=WS.10).aspx)

  • Functions Reference

Configuring attribute flow mappings is an elementary task when configuring synchronization rules. The simplest form of an attribute flow mapping is a direct mapping. As indicated by the name, a direct mapping takes the value of a source attribute and applies it to the configured destination attribute. There are cases where you either need existing attribute values to be modified or new attribute values to be calculated before the system applies them to a destination.

Functions are a built-in method used to define the type of modification you need the synchronization engine to apply when generating an attribute value for an object.

In FIM, you can group the existing functions into the following categories:

 

  1. Data Manipulation Functions.
    • Functions to perform a variety of manipulation operations on strings.
  2. Data Retrieval Functions.
    • Functions to extract data from attribute values.
  3. Data Generation Functions.
    • Functions to generate values.
  4. Logic Functions.
    • Functions to perform operations based on conditions.

 

Data Manipulation Functions

  • Data manipulation functions are used to perform a variety of manipulation operations on strings.

 

Concatenate 

Description 

The Concatenate function is used to concatenate two or more strings.

Function Signature 

string1 + string2 + …

Inputs 

Two or more strings

Operations 

All input string parameters are concatenated with each other.

Output 

One string

 

 

UpperCase 

Description 

The UpperCase function converts all characters in a string to upper
  case.

Function Signature 

String UpperCase(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

All lower case characters of the input parameter are
  converted to upper case characters.

Example: UpperCase(“test”) results
  in “TEST”.

Output 

One string

 

 

 

LowerCase 

Description 

The LowerCase function converts all characters in a string to lower
  case.

Function Signature 

String LowerCase(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

All upper case characters of the input parameter are converted to lower case characters.

Example: LowerCase(“TeSt”) results in “test”.

Output 

One string

 

 

 

Proper Case

Description 

The ProperCase function coverts the first character of each
  space-delimited word in a string to upper case and all other characters are
  converted to lower case.

Function Signature 

String ProperCase(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

The first character of every space-delimited word in the input parameter is converted to upper case, and all upper case characters are converted to lower case characters.

If a word in the input parameter starts with a non-alphabet character, the first character of the word is not converted to upper case.

Examples:

  •   ProperCase(“TEsT”) results in “Test”.
  •   ProperCase(“britta simon”) results in “Britta Simon”.
  •   ProperCase(“TEsT”) results in “ Test”.
  •   ProperCase(“$TEsT”) results in “$Test”.

Output 

One string

 

 

LTrim

Description 

The LTrim function removes leading white spaces from a string.

Function Signature 

String LTrim(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

The leading white space characters contained in the input parameter are removed.

Example: LTrim(“ Test ”) results in “Test ”.

Output 

One string

 

 

RTrim 

Description 

The RTrim function removes trailing white spaces from a string.

Function Signature 

String RTrim(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

The trailing white space characters contained in the input parameter are removed.

Example: RTrim(“ Test ”) results in “ Test”.

Output 

One string

 

 

Trim 

Description 

The Trim function removes leading and trailing white spaces from a
  string.

Function Signature 

String Trim(string)

Inputs 

One string

Operations 

The leading and trailing white space characters contained
  in the string are removed.

Example: Trim(“ Test ”) results in
  “Test”.

Output 

One string

 

 

RightPad 

Description 

The RightPad function right-pads a string to a specified length by using a provided padding character.

Function Signature 

String RightPad(string, length, padCharacter)

Inputs 

  1. string. The string to pad.
  2. length. An integer representing the desired length of string.
  3. padCharacter. A string that consist of a single character to be used as a pad character.

Operations 

If the length of string is less than length, then padCharacter is repeatedly appended to the end of string until it has a length equal to length.

Examples:

  • RightPad(“User”,10, “0”) would result in “User000000”.
  • RightPad(RandomNum(1,10),5, “0”) could result in “9000”.

 Note: padCharacter can be a space character, but it cannot be a null value. If the   length of string is equal to or greater than length, string is returned unchanged.

 Output

If string has a length greater than or equal to length, a string identical to string is returned.

If the length of string is less than length, then a new string of the desired length is returned containing string padded with a padCharacter. If string is null, the function returns an empty string.

 

 

 

LeftPad 

Description 

The LeftPad function left-pads a string to a specified length by using a provided padding character. 

Function Signature 

String LeftPad(string, length, padCharacter)

Inputs 

  1. string. The string to pad.
  2. length. An integer representing the desired length of string.
  3. padCharacter. A string that consists of a single character to be used as pad character.

Operations 

If the length of string is less than length, then padCharacter is repeatedly appended to the beginning of string until it has a length equal to length.

Examples:

  • LeftPad(“User”,10, “0”) would result in “000000User”.
  • LeftPad(RandomNum(1,10),5, “0”) could result in “0009”.

  Note: padCharacter can be a space character, but it cannot be a null value. If the length of string is   equal to or greater than length, string is returned unchanged.

 

Output 

If string has a length greater than or equal to length, a string identical to string is
returned.

If the length of string is less than length, then a new string of the desired length is returned containing string padded with a padCharacter.

If string is null, the function returns an empty string.

 

 

BitOr 

Description 

The BitOr function sets a specified bit on a flag to 1.

Function Signature 

Int BitOr(mask, flag)

Inputs 

  1. mask. A hexadecimal value that specifies the bit to set on the flag.
  2. flag. A hexadecimal value that is to have a specific bit modified.

Operations 

This
  function converts both parameters to binary representation and compares them:
 

  •   Sets a bit to 1 if one or both of the corresponding bits
      in mask and flag are 1 and to 0 if both of the corresponding bits are 0.
  •   It returns 1 in all cases except where the corresponding
      bits of both parameters are 0. 
  •   The
      resulting bit pattern is the "set" (1 or true) bits of any of the
      two operands. Multiple flag bits can be set if multiple bits have the value 1
      in mask.

Output
   

A new version of flag, with the bits specified in mask set to 1.

 

 

BitAnd 

Description 

The BitAnd function sets a specified bit on a flag to 0.

Function Signature 

Int BitOr(mask, flag)

Inputs 

  1. mask. A hexadecimal value that specifies the bit to modify on the flag.
  2. flag. A hexadecimal value that is to have a specific bit modified.

Operations 

This function converts both parameters to binary representation and compares them:

  • Sets a bit to 0 if one or both of the corresponding bits in mask and flag are 0 and to 1 if both of the corresponding bits are 1. 
  • It returns 0 in all cases except where the corresponding bits of both parameters are 1. Multiple flag bits can be set to 0 if multiple bits have the value 0 in mask.

Output 

A new version of flag with the bits specified in mask set to 0.

 

 

DateTimeFormat  

Description

The DateTimeFormat function is used to format a DateTime in string form to a specified format.

Function Signature

String DateTimeFormat(dateTime, format)

   Inputs 

  1. dateTime. A string representing the DateTime to format.
  2. format. A string representing the format to convert to.

Operations 

The format string specified in format is applied to the DateTime in the dateTime string.

The string specified in format must be a valid DateTime format. If it is not, an error is returned indicating that the format is not a valid   DateTime format.
  
  Note:  For the characters accepted to create user-defined formats, see

User-Defined Date/Time Formats (Format Function) http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=195182. 

Example: DateTime(“12/25/2007”, “yyyy-MM-dd”) results in “2007-12-25”.

Output 

A string resulting from applying format to dateTime.

 

 

ConvertSidToString 

Description 

The ConvertSidToString converts a byte array containing a security identifier to a string.

Function Signature 

String ConvertSidToString(ObjectSID)

Inputs 

ObjectSID. A byte array containing a security identifier (SID).

Operations 

The specified binary SID is converted to a string.

Output 

A string representation of the SID.

 

 

ConvertStringToGuid 

Description 

The ConvertStringToGuid function converts the string representation of a GUID to a binary representation of the GUID.

Function Signature 

Byte[] ConvertStringToGuid(stringGuid)

Inputs 

Guid. A string formatted in this pattern: xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, where the value of the GUID is represented as a series of hexadecimal digits in groups of 8, 4, 4, 4, and 12 digits and separated by hyphens. An example of a return value is "382c74c3-721d-4f34-80e557657b6cbc27".

Operations 

The string Guid specified in parameter 1 is converted to its binary representation. If the string is not a representation of a valid Guid, the function rejects the argument with the following error: 

The parameter for the ConvertStringToGuid function must be a string representing a valid Guid.
 

Output 

A binary representation of the Guid.

 

 

ReplaceString 

Description 

The ReplaceString function replaces all occurrences of a string to another string.

Function Signature 

String ReplaceString(string, OldValue, NewValue)

Inputs 

  1. String. A string in which to replace values.
  2. OldValue. The string to search for and to replace.
  3. NewValue. The string to replace to.

Note:   NewValue can be an empty string “”. Neither String nor OldValue can be empty.

Operations 

All occurrences of OldValue in the string are replaced with NewValue. The function must be able to handle the following special characters:

  • \n. New Line.
  • \r. Carriage Return.
  • \t. Tab.

Example: ReplaceString(“One\n\rMicrosoft\n\r\Way”,”\n\r”,” “) returns “One Microsoft Way”.

Output 

A string with all occurrences of OldValue in the string replaced with NewValue.

 

 

Mid 

Description 

The Mid function returns a specified number of characters from a
  specified position in a string.

Function Signature 

String Mid(string, pos, numChars)

Inputs 

  1. string. The string from which to return characters. 
  2. pos. A number identifying the starting position in a string for returning characters. 
  3. numChars. A number identifying the number of characters to return from a position in the string.

Operations 

Return numChars characters starting from position pos in the string.

Example: Mid(“Britta Simon”, 3, 5) would return “itta ”.

Output 

A string containing numChars characters from position pos in a string:

  • If numChars = 0, return an empty string.
  • If numChars < 0, return an empty string.
  • If pos > the length of string, return an input string.
  • If pos ≤ 0, return an input string.
  • If string is null, return an empty string.

If there are no numChar characters remaining in string from position pos, as many characters as can be
  returned are returned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data generation functions

Data generation functions are used to generate values for specific data types.

 

CRLF 

Description 

The CRLF generates a Carriage Return/Line Feed. You use this function
  to add a new line.

Function Signature 

String CRLF

Inputs 

No parameters

Operations 

A CRLF is returned.

Example: AddressLine1 + CRLF() + AddressLine2 results in:

  •   AddressLine1
     
  •   AddressLine2
     

Output 

A CRLF is the output.

 

Logic Functions

Logic functions are used to perform an operation based on conditions evaluated by the system.

 

 

IIF

Description 

The IIF function returns one of a set of possible values based on a specified condition.

Function Signature 

Object IIF(condition, valueIfTrue, valueIfFalse)

Inputs 

  1. Condition. Any value or expression that can be evaluated to true or false.
  2. valueIfTrue A value that is returned if the condition evaluates to true.
  3. valueIfFalse A value that is returned if the condition evaluates to false.

The following are functions available for use as expressions in the IIF function as condition:

 Eq. This function compares two
  arguments for equality.

NotEquals. This function compares two arguments for inequality, returning true if they are
  not equal and false if they are equal.

Example: NotEquals(EmployeeType, "Contractor")

LessThan. This function compares two numbers, returning true if the first is less than the
  second and false otherwise.

Example: LessThan(Salary, 100000)

GreaterThan. This function compares two numbers, returning true if the first is greater than
  the second and false otherwise.

Example: GreaterThan(Salary, 100000)

LessThanOrEquals. This function compares two numbers, returning true if the first is less than or equal to the second and false otherwise.

Example: LessThanOrEquals(Salary, 100000)

GreaterThanOrEquals. This function compares two numbers, returning true if the first is greater than or is equal to the second and false otherwise.

Example:
  GreaterThanOrEquals(Salary, 100000)

 

IsPresent. This function takes as input an
  attribute in the ILM schema and returns true if the attribute is not null and
  false if the attribute is null.

Operations 

If condition
  evaluates to true, return valueIfTrue.
  Otherwise return valueIfFalse.

Example: IIF(Eq(EmployeeType,”Intern”),”t-“ + Alias,
  Alias)returns the alias of a user with “t-“ added to the beginning of it if
  the user is an intern.

Otherwise, it returns the user’s
  alias as is.

Output 

The output is valueIfTrue if the condition is true or valueIfFalse if the condition is false.

 

Now that you are at least a bit more familiar with working with the Default Workflows within the FIM Portal, you may wish to begin understanding Advanced Work Flows which utilize Custom Workflow Activities built with the .NET Framework.

 

Understanding Advanced Workflows (Coming Soon)

 

Comments (2)

  1. Thank you Anirban this appears to be the effect of blogging without sleep.

  2. Anirban Singha says:

    In the above three workflow "Authentication" is mentioned twice and one should be replaced by "AuthZ" workflow

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