Windows x64

Over the past few years, I’ve done a lot of presentations on x64 technology as it pertains to game developers and DirectX technologies. Here is a collection of links for developers interested in learning more about the Windows x64 OS and x64 native programming generally. Technical Articles 64-bit programming for Game Developers (DirectX SDK)  RAM, VRAM,…

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DirectX and .NET

With the DirectX SDK (June 2010) release and the addition of support for Visual Studio 2010, I’ve been seeing a lot of questions of the form: How do I create a DirectX .NET application in Visual Studio 2010? I can’t find Microsoft.DirectX to add to my project but I have the DirectX SDK (June 2010)…

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DXWEBSETUP Update

We’ve republished the June 2010 DirectX End-User Runtime Web Installer, which now shows a release date of “11/30/2010”. This deploys all the same binaries as the June 2010 version, but the setup itself has been updated to resolve a few key issues. For the June 2010 DirectX SDK release, we switched over to the Visual…

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Known Issue: D3D11InstallHelper sample

I recently found a minor problem with the existing D3D11InstallHelper sample that shipped in August 2009, February 2010, and June 2010 versions of the DirectX SDK. The supplied version of D3D11Install.exe is correct, but if you compile it using the Visual Studio project yourself, it does not properly inject a reference to the Windows Common…

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June 2010 HLSL Compiler Issue with Tessellation

One of our areas of focus for the DirectX SDK (June 2010) release was to make sure our samples supported Direct3D 11 hardware from NVIDIA, as we had previously only had AMD/ATI Direct3D 11 hardware to work with. There were a few issues that arose right around the release with the SubD11 and PNTriangles11 samples. At…

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Goodbye to an old friend…

Today, October 22, 2010, the sale of Windows XP comes to an end. There will still be support available for Windows XP Service Pack 3 through April 2014, and it will be sticking around for a time in some business,  government, and emerging market settings, but by in large the days of Windows XP are…

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Not So Direct Setup

When the DirectX technology was created in the mid 1990s, it was designed to be deployed by games into the Windows 95 operating system as part of the game’s install process. As the number of supported operating systems grew, so did the complexities of deploying these components. The DirectSetup API and well-known DXSETUP.EXE program became…

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Direct3D 11 Multithreading

 There’s a lot of interest in the Multithreading features in Direct3D 11, especially since it can be used with existing Direct3D 10.x and 10level9 class hardware as well as new Direct3D 11 hardware. In addition to the Windows DirectX Graphics documentation, here are a number of resources for learning more about Direct3D 11 multithreading:  Gamefest 2008…

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"Who moved my [Windows Media] Cheese"?

Since the release of Windows XP Service Pack 2, support for the Windows Media codec (WMV) has been built into the OS, so developers have come to rely on it being there particularly for DirectShow playback of cutscenes or video textures. On Windows Vista, we introduced the Windows Media Foundation APIs as well. Much like…

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Known Issue: Direct3D 11 UpdateSubresource and Deferred Contexts

The UpdateSubresource method on the D3D11DeviceContext interface takes as one of it’s parameters an optional destination offset: void UpdateSubresource( [in] ID3D11Resource *pDstResource, [in] UINT DstSubresource, [in] const D3D11_BOX *pDstBox, [in] const void *pSrcData, [in] UINT SrcRowPitch, [in] UINT SrcDepthPitch );  This works as advertised for the immediate device context which operates directly on the GPU,…

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