New Pricing for OneNote


Today (Monday) Microsoft announced that we are going to a unified price worldwide for OneNote 2003. Until today, OneNote was $99.95 in Japan, and USD$199.95 everywhere else. In the US and Canada there was a rebate coupon for USD$100 off (CDN$150), which effectively made the price $99.95, but you had to deal with the rebate.



The new price is a simple $99.95 worldwide, which means the rest of the world (e.g. Europe) can get the lower price currently being enjoyed in Japan and the US.



With a new product you have to experiment a bit to see where the pricing sweet spot is, and $99 seems to be it based on the amazing response we are getting in Japan in particular, which had the lower price from the start. Keep in mind that although the price change is effective immediately, not every brick and mortar retail store will jump up and change the price tags on the boxes so you may not see the new price if you run to the store tomorrow morning – as I am sure you will do after reading this 🙂



Academic pricing is still $49, and if you plan to buy in large quantities you can get a volume license (“large” means 5 or more). From comments I hear it sounds like a lot of people don’t realize that you can get discounts if you are buying OneNote for a small office or workgroup. For details see this page.



Jeremy Wagstaff picked up the price change. You can read his comments here. He also wrote a very nice article about OneNote in the Wall Street Journal and the Far Eastern Economic review. These are premium content but if you subscribe you can read them. Here’s a link to the FEER article (http://feer.com/articles/2004/0408_05/p036innov.html)

Comments (9)

  1. Roland Siegert says:

    Chris,

    The price reduction is very welcome!

    I know of many people here in Germany who were interested to buy OneNote but finally didn’t because it was so expensive. In fact, OneNote still costs 249 EUR (~ $299 !!) at Amazon Germany (see http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000C0XNG/qid=1091531946/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/302-6647581-7844859). Therefore, many people in Germany bought Toshiba OEM versions of OneNote at eBay. I’m sure this will change now after the huge price reduction…

    Regards,

    Roland

  2. Great news! OneNote is a fantastic product and I hope it gets more widespread usage.

  3. I think the pricing is good… looking forward to giving it a real go. I am using a PC and XP for the first time in a long while as a longtime mac user. One issue with OneNote is this — it won’t install. Both my attempts and those of my system administrator are blocked by a lovely error – Fatal Error During Installation

  4. Sam Smith says:

    A very welcome reduction! That actually puts the price at a pretty nice level here in Europe, at least in the UK, as we are strong against the dollar.

  5. Mike Walsh Helsinki says:

    Somehow I doubt whether the price will actually be the equivalent of $99 in Europe.

    For one we have different levels of tax in the different countries thus adding different amounts to the basic price.

    For two $99 is a US dollar sweet spot – but in Europe (well most of it) the sweet spot would be 99 Euros or a 20% increase and in the UK no doubt £99 (a 50%+ increase).

    So the strong pound someone else referred to isn’t going to help much in my opinion.

    We’ve always had to pay over prices for US software and it’s not going to stop with this product – laudable though that would be.

  6. Mike, the $99 is MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price), and of course the price we charge retailers is less that that so that they can make a decent margin at the $99 in-store price. You’re right – the retailers have control over what they set the price to be (in the US, they tend to set the price under the MSRP due to the intense competition). One hopes that competition between retailers and the relatively free market in Europe means you have a chance of getting the product for a price close to MSRP. A price of $99 (or euro equivalent) gives retailers a significant margin so they don’t have to go beyond that unless they choose to. Taxes are on top of the price we set too. I hope the price you end up with in Europe tends to be at least <100 euros. And maybe ~£79 in the UK?

  7. Mike Walsh Helsinki says:

    Fingers crossed. It’s in any case a nice start setting the MSRP to be the same. Thanks for that!

    [Things are in any case much better than they were when I moved to Finland 15 years ago when local prices were what they could get (=high) and local support what they could get away with (=low)]

  8. Edward says:

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1634898,00.asp

    He doesn’t seem to be having a very good experiance with it, and his article has garnered a wave of comments with similar complaints.

    How can you respond when such high profile tech commentators produce a long list of problems.

    A lot of it seems to be based on misconceptions but its a bit hard to explain "HTML output is designed for round-tripping not for webpage creation" when he just wants it to work the way he thinks it ought to.