From Arduino to Energia

I still remember that seven or eight years ago developers had to pay from USD400 to 900 in order to buy a development board. And even if you had a board, you needed to pay some money for software development tools. Finally, using the board and the tool you could start develop your application using…


Smart bulbs or how to be lazier (part 1)

Probably, AllJoyn is the only topic that I have never covered in my posts. I simply don’t have any AllJoyn device. Once Microsoft introduced AllJoyn support I discovered that the cheapest LED costs around fifty American dollars and my positive attitude to AllJoyn decreased to minimum. Of course, I could use my laptop and Raspberry…


PICAXE: good way to get the first experience with microcontrollers

In the previous post I told that when buying an Arduino, Netduino, Nucleo or DragonBoard 410C board, you get the board that can help you achieve two goals: Getting a prototyping board for the selected microcontroller. If you have an idea and even don’t have much knowledge in electronics, you can use the prototyping board…


How to select the right micro board?

“It’s strange. Usually people buy Arduino”, said a seller to another in from my favorite electronic shop in Vancouver. I wanted to buy several chips and a board for development called LaunchPad (MSP-EXP430G2). This board allows to program MSP430G2xx microcontrollers in DIL packages from Texas Instruments and it is definitely not an Arduino compatible board….


Arduino shield for Raspberry Pi 2 or How to solve problems with PWM, analog input and not burn down the apartment with a soldering iron

I have already published some posts where I told about Raspberry, Arduino and other boards as about boards for your own prototypes. Using these boards you can easily create something before you invite real engineers, who will make a custom board for you based on your needs. And it’s clear that all existing boards have…


IoT For Humans (and Developers) – Getting Started with my Microsoft Band

Making the “Internet of Things” make sense to observers outside the industry is going to take a lot of work. While we might grow frustrated with the overuse and below-required understanding of the term, I would argue that in the industry we have a long way to go to fully understand the implications of security,…


Internet of Things: My first experience with Galileo 2 (part 5)

When you are planning to build your own device you should think about power. In some cases it’s OK to connect your device to the nearest socket but for some projects it will not work. Just imagine a robot, which requires access to socket. So, we need to use independent sources of power like batteries….


Internet of Things: My first experience with Galileo 2 (part 4)

Today I am going to continue my series about Galileo 2 board for beginners and I will discuss analog inputs. But before it, I want to discuss resistors as well. We already used several resistors in our projects in previous posts but it’s still too hard to understand a value of particular resistor. There are…


Internet of Things: My first experience with Galileo (part 3)

In the previous post we developed our first device based on digital outputs from Galileo board. Today I am going to show emulation of analog outputs. But before we will start to create something I want to return to question about electric schemas. Frankly speaking I am not sure if I want to learn all…


Driving the Value of the Internet of Things

When I saw this video, my first reaction was “Wow.. that’s looks so futuristic!” and while it may be the future, it is not futuristic at all – it’s technology that is present today! It just fascinates me as to what can be done when you put a whole bunch of technologies together to solve…