Having trouble to create rpc/literal proxies on .NET?

You have to get the just released WSCF (aka WsContractFirst) tool! Beside some other new features; v.04 supports proxy/stub generation based on rpc/literal WSDL descriptions. Superb!!

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Thoughts on Web Service Contracts: The different artifacts

I’m currently thinking about Web Service contracts with the goal to achieve the highest level of compensability and reusability. I like to share some of my thoughts… First of all, Web Service contracts should be structured into the following four artifacts: Common types Service/domain specific types Service messages Service descriptions Messages Interfaces Bindings Services Common…

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Web Services Quiz: Issue 9 – the Answer

Both, Christian and Davanum were absolutely right with their answers: Issue 9’s Operation Add (part of the CalculatorPort) defines first its output and then the corresponding input message.     <portType name=”CalculatorPort”>     <operation name=”Add”>       <output name=”AddResponse” message=”tns:AddResponseMsg” />       <input name=”AddRequest” message=”tns:AddRequestMsg” />     </operation>   </portType>   You may ask yourself why…

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Interested in Z#?

A. Wöß and H. Mössenböck from the University of Linz just published the following courseware:   Compiler Construction – Concepts and Practical Application to .NETThis course builds a complete compiler for the programming language Z# (= subset of C#) that produces .NET executables. It will teach students the following skills: Acquire the practical skills to…

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Web Services Quiz: Issue 9

YAWSQ (Yet Another Web Services Quiz)   This issue is really interesting. It beautifully demonstrates one of the over-engineered but poorly specified parts of the WSDL 1.1 specification. The following WSDL is very similar to the one I got from one of my customers. He simply had trouble to generate proxies or stubs based on…

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JAOO 2004: My retrospection

Last week’s JAOO was great. After two presentations, two panels, three social events and a lot of interesting discussions I’ve finally managed to get home again. For all of you who attended my sessions, here is a summary of their core messages:   Understanding the Grey Area between Service and Object Oriented Design Implementation type…

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What’s wrong with rpc-literal?

This post is part of Issue 8’s answer   To say it as clear and simple as possible: rpc style encoding is more about the service implementation than the message on the wire itself. That’s just wrong! As already discussed in this answer series, every rpc-literal message can be described using doc-literal encodings. Therefore there…

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Back alive and ready for JAOO

After two and a half week of perfect rock climbing in Southern France and Northern Italy I’m back alive and ready for my presentations at JAOO. Hope to see you there!

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How to consume an rpc-literal WS using .NET?

This post is part of Issue 8’s answer   The previous post in this answer series discussed rpc-literal from a platform independent standpoint, where this post focuses on the consumption of such services using .NET. You may ask why consumption only? Well, rpc-literal is so bad that you won’t use it for your own services….

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What is rpc-literal anyway?

Although it’s a longtime ago, I want to follow up with the promised explanations for Issue 8:   Prolog: WS BP 1.0 prohibits the usage of rpc-encoded but explicitly allows rpc-literal. But what is rpc-literal anyway?   Rpc stands for remote procedure call. If you want to apply this technology in loosely coupled environments, you’ll…

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