Using the language you want


Since its introduction in Windows 2000, Multilingual User Interface technology, or MUI, has allowed customers to install additional display languages on their Windows PCs and to switch between them. But for the majority of users, the language you got when you booted up your Windows PC for the first time was likely the one you were stuck with. For Windows 8, we have reimagined the display language experience, focusing on making additional display languages available to all Windows users, making them super easy to find and install, and allowing users to switch between them. This blog entry unveils the changes we’ve been making in Windows to achieve this.

February 21 marks UNESCO’s International Mother Language Day.  This year’s theme is “Mother tongue instruction and inclusive education” and we think making sure Windows can be used in the language you want is one way we can contribute to this goal.  For more information from UNESCO please see the full site.

Ian Hamilton, a program manager on our Windows International team, authored this post.
–Steven


With Windows 8, we’ve changed how we think about languages from a “local-market feature” to a “feature for everyone everywhere,” and have made it a priority for you to be able to work in any language you want, from any Windows 8 PC. If you can’t read the text that Windows presents to you, you can’t use Windows to its fullest potential. That’s why we are so excited to bring powerful, easy-to-use language features to more users than ever in Windows 8.

In some countries, people can purchase PCs with a variety of languages preinstalled. With Windows 8, users will be able install additional display languages beyond those preinstalled languages. This means that the language of the PC no longer needs to be a major consideration when deciding on which model to buy. If the language you want is not preinstalled on the PC you like, you can now install the one you want.

But for some families, allowing the installation of an additional display language might not be enough, as they also need the ability to switch between languages. To illustrate the point, let’s look at the United States (where historically we have been less sensitive to these issues than in most other places around the world). We know from 2009 census data that 80% of Americans speak English at home. The other 20% speak something other than English. Not surprisingly, 35,468,501 (12.41% of the total) speak Spanish at home. Some PCs sold in the US have had English and Spanish preinstalled on them. On those PCs, the user picks one language or the other, and the one not chosen is wiped off the hard drive after first run. Feedback showed that customers loved having a Spanish language PC, but what they really needed was Spanish and English, and the ability to switch between them. A subsequent study by an outside firm confirmed these results. In many cases, parents in the home spoke Spanish, and their children were speaking English. The ability to have a Spanish user account for the parents, and an English one for the kids—or at least the ability to switch a single account’s display language back and forth between English and Spanish—was the way to delight these customers.

New, easier way to get languages

The new Language preferences section in Control Panel is the new one-stop place to find all Windows display languages in Windows 8. In the past, some languages were available through Windows Update, and others were distributed through the Microsoft Download Center.

The reasons for separating the languages into two groups and their separated distribution channels made no sense to our customers. It wasn’t their fault. This classification of languages only made sense to our internal teams. This confusion was a great motivator for re-imagining Language preferences in Control Panel. We will no longer ask customers to understand these nuances. Looking at the end-to-end experience, it made sense to build an entirely new experience around the acquisition of new languages. Here’s what that looks like in Windows 8:

Dialog heading: Change your language preferences / Link: Add a language / English (United States) is the only item in list of languages

Language preferences in Control Panel

The main view of Language preferences shows you which languages are enabled on your system. You can see that on this system, English (United States) display language is installed and enabled. The keyboard layout is also US. Language preferences is the one place to go to add or change display languages, input language, and other functionality. We’ll be talking more about that in future blog posts.

To add another language to your Windows, simply click the “Add a language” link above the first tile to bring up this list.

 

Add a language / Use the search box to find more. A long, scrolling list of languages are shown which the user can select from.

List of languages you can add to Windows

Select the language you want from the list. In these screenshots, I’m selecting Hindi. This list is long. Luckily, it’s filterable. Just type the first few letters of the language you want into the search box, and the list is narrowed for you. This search filter works in both the native script as seen on the tile, and the localized name of the language.

The Language preferences page now has two languages listed, English and Hindi, with an Options command for each.

Hindi language has been added

Once selected, the language is added to your language list, but does not download and install the display language until you choose to do so. To add it as a display language, click Options.

Hindi / Windows display language / A language pack for Hindi is available for download / Link: Download and install language pack / Input method / Hindi Traditional / Commands: Preview or Remove / Add an input method

The Options page for this language shows the status of the language pack

If a language pack is available for your language, you will see the link to “Download and install language pack.”

A progress bar is shown on a pop up dialog. It says "The updates are being downloaded and installed."

You can monitor progress of the download and installation

To switch to the newly installed display language, you’ll need to make it your primary language, by clicking “Make this the primary language,” as seen in the next screenshot.

Commands available for Hindi: Make this the primary language / Uninstall display language

Make your new language the primary language on the PC

Two languages now listed: English and Hindi, with Hindi selected as the primary language

Hindi is now the primary language on this PC

It’s as simple as that. Pretty cool, huh? No more hunting around on websites looking for the languages you want. They’re right here. If you are currently using Windows Vista or Windows 7 Ultimate, you probably see 34 or 35 languages as optional updates in your Windows Update UI. These won’t show up there anymore in Windows 8. Instead, we’ve consolidated the languages in one place for you: Language preferences in Control Panel. Language preferences will be a clean, unified control for all Windows display languages moving forward.

More languages than ever before

Microsoft will continue to be a market leader in language support with an additional 14 new display languages for Windows 8, bringing the total to 109 languages. (For reference, here are the 95 languages in which Windows 7 is currently available). With these additional languages, Windows will provide a native language version of Windows for over 4.5 billion people.

It is important to note that a display language in Windows is a massive undertaking—Windows needs to support the fonts, localized text, and input methods to support a user experience that encompasses almost two million words. That’s roughly the same number of words contained in two full sets of the Harry Potter series of books.

We are proud to announce the addition of English for the United Kingdom to the list of Windows display languages. We admit that this is something we should have done a long time ago. Windows users in the UK have gotten by with the US English version of Windows, and while we Americans knew this was not their favourite, that is clearly no defence. We believe that this version of Windows will also be widely used in India, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, the Republic of Ireland and many other places.

We are releasing English for the United Kingdom as a standalone language. Standalone languages contain all the user interface components needed to be independent versions of Windows. Standalone languages can be used by OEMs to image a PC, or can be purchased as boxed software.

The release of English for the United Kingdom is also a trial run for us. Adding a second language under an already existing primary language code—ISO 3166-2 EN—poses some engineering challenges for us (which is why this took us so long to do). We have had to pay attention to the language fallback chain, for instance. If there are no localized resources available at any time, we fall back to secondary choices and then to English. That used to be English US. But, now there’s English UK as well. Which do we fall back to? So far, planning for these scenarios is looking good.

We are also continuing to broaden our language support with the addition of 13 new Language Interface Packs (LIPs). Language Interface Packs install over the top of a standalone Windows display language. These lightweight packs contain localized user interface elements for the most commonly-used Windows features. The new languages offered include Punjabi (Pakistan), Sindhi (Pakistan), Central Kurdish (Iraq), Uyghur (People’s Republic of China), Belarusian (Belarus), Kinyarwanda (Rwanda), Tigrinya (Ethiopia), Tajik (Tajikistan), Wolof (Senegal), K’iche’ (Guatemala), Scottish Gaelic (United Kingdom), Cherokee (United States), Valencian (Spain).

This set of languages includes language coverage for emerging markets that are experiencing great growth in PC usage: Punjabi (Pakistan), Sindhi (Pakistan), Central Kurdish (Iraq), Uyghur (People’s Republic of China), Belarusian (Belarus), Kinyarwanda (Rwanda), Tigrinya (Ethiopia), Tajik (Tajikistan), Wolof (Senegal), K’iche’ (Guatemala); and a few languages that are preferred by groups of customers in developed markets: Cherokee (United States), Scottish Gaelic (United Kingdom), Valencian (Spain).

While these packages remain different in how they’re installed, users will not need to understand those differences. Language preferences in Control Panel is the one place where they’ll go to get new Windows display languages, and it handles download and installation seamlessly.

Display languages are just the beginning

Most of this post has focused on Windows display languages—the language of the Windows user interface on your computer. We have focused our language efforts in Windows 8 on:

  • Enabling more users than ever to install additional languages on their Windows PCs and switch between them.
  • Building a Language preferences area in Control Panel that is an easy-to-use central location for all display languages.
  • Making significant additions to our language list by adding one standalone language and 13 Language Interface Packs (LIPs).

We’re super excited about these improvements in Windows, and we hope you’ll like them as well.

But display languages are only one part of the overall language story for Windows 8. In a future blog entry we will tell you about improvements in text entry, locale support, and other critical pieces of the Windows 8 story. Let us know if there are other language-related topics you’d like to hear more about.

Thank you,

Ian Hamilton

Comments (263)

  1. Mayur Prayag ( India ) says:

    Current IE Team is not brilliant ,talented.They can't think from user's view.Steven ,Please Remove IE development team ,appoint new team like Windows 7 team or give project to Google ,they will develop IE like Chrome and later you tell world that we(Microsoft) developed "the IE"…..but finally we will get better IE ….Please reply me or guaranty me that future IE will be a benchmark …..the best…..better than Chrome……

    Below are IE's failure Reasons:

    1) IE's UI feels very heavy when first opened.

    2) IE is not simple means back button and forward button is not light.

    3) IE is slow

    4) IE takes more time when loading Facebook and Twitter…..!!!!!!

    5) Give IE's development to  "Google" and they will tell you how to develop a web browser.

    6) Please,copy the chrome UI ,responsiveness , simpleness…..then and then only IE will be great         otherwise whatever mini Internet,millions test you do ,it is of no use……

    7) chrome feels very light and IE feels like ton of load on our head..

    8) when we open any site IE ask for default browser in a very sluggish manner…

    9)  IE smart screen filter very slow takes much time

    10) Remove status bar from IE

    11) Take some development lessons from Google Team so that you can develop OS like Android and browser like Chrome….

    12) Within 3 years Google showed your position in market(Browser)…

    13) Microsoft is not very serious about IE…

    14) Current IE 9 is like Windows Vista ,make some strict steps and give IE 10 like Windows 7,8 performance …..

    15) Make proper Acid 3 tests,because when user sees Acid 3 tests after release on various sites,they give very less marks to Internet Explorer….

    16) Make UI clean,again I'm giving warning otherwise within 5 years you will lost completely..

    17) When we Right Click on empty space,a lot of items appear…..Remove many items(Translation etc) from right click

    18) Keep less items for Right click …..we want that

    19)Current IE Team is not brilliant ,talented.

    20)They can't think from user's view

                                                              Most Importantly, All will agree that,        "  Last thing ,we all people wanted that IE must beat chrome…….when we double click chrome icon on desktop ,it opens smoothly and feel softs,smoother …..whereas IE feels like scratches on our Screen,skin etc……!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.."

    I hope you will take a lesson from above .I'm an end user.

                                                                  Reply me Sir …..

  2. Mayur Prayag ( India ) says:

    Current IE Team is not brilliant ,talented.They can't think from user's view.Steven ,Please Remove IE development team ,appoint new team like Windows 7 team or give project to Google ,they will develop IE like Chrome and later you tell world that we(Microsoft) developed "the IE"…..but finally we will get better IE ….Please reply me or guaranty me that future IE will be a benchmark …..the best…..better than Chrome……

    Below are IE's failure Reasons:

    1) IE's UI feels very heavy when first opened.

    2) IE is not simple means back button and forward button is not light.

    3) IE is slow

    4) IE takes more time when loading Facebook and Twitter…..!!!!!!

    5) Give IE's development to  "Google" and they will tell you how to develop a web browser.

    6) Please,copy the chrome UI ,responsiveness , simpleness…..then and then only IE will be great         otherwise whatever mini Internet,millions test you do ,it is of no use……

    7) chrome feels very light and IE feels like ton of load on our head..

    8) when we open any site IE ask for default browser in a very sluggish manner…

    9)  IE smart screen filter very slow takes much time

    10) Remove status bar from IE

    11) Take some development lessons from Google Team so that you can develop OS like Android and browser like Chrome….

    12) Within 3 years Google showed your position in market(Browser)…

    13) Microsoft is not very serious about IE…

    14) Current IE 9 is like Windows Vista ,make some strict steps and give IE 10 like Windows 7,8 performance …..

    15) Make proper Acid 3 tests,because when user sees Acid 3 tests after release on various sites,they give very less marks to Internet Explorer….

    16) Make UI clean,again I'm giving warning otherwise within 5 years you will lost completely..

    17) When we Right Click on empty space,a lot of items appear…..Remove many items(Translation etc) from right click

    18) Keep less items for Right click …..we want that

    19)Current IE Team is not brilliant ,talented.

    20)They can't think from user's view

                                                              Most Importantly, All will agree that,        "  Last thing ,we all people wanted that IE must beat chrome…….when we double click chrome icon on desktop ,it opens smoothly and feel softs,smoother …..whereas IE feels like scratches on our Screen,skin etc……!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.."

    I hope you will take a lesson from above .I'm an end user.

                                                                          Reply me Sir…….

  3. trukhinyuri says:

    what about phonetic russian keyboard?

  4. Wilin says:

    Can this be done without leaving the metro environment? I like the abbility to do these dings and on a desktop it seems pretty easy to do, but on a tablet you should be able to do everything within metro.

  5. Max says:

    Why MacOS X and Linux have languages preinstalled, and in Windows we have to download about 400 megabytes for each language?

  6. BurningOrange says:

    I would like to see a language pack for Khmer which also includes ink text entry. The current Khmer language pack is great already, but ink entry is missing. I know it's a small market, but I'm sure it will grow.

  7. @Wilin

    Yes, that would be good, they just need to add an option in the PC Settings App for the Language/ Keyboard options.

    So when you support EN-UK  with Win8 now, there will be built in ISOs with that lp?

  8. Alan Burchll says:

    Will you support English Australia, as use a different dictonary to UK…  e.g. we spell Jail… Gaol

  9. Please make non-unicode aware programs run in a more compatible applocale style built-in enviornment so we don't have to restart PC to run non-unicode programs in different language

  10. Steven that's great work dude!

    Some questions:

    1. Those settings will be available in the Metro UI settings as well or only available from the classic Control Panel?

    2. What about Spell Check? With Spell Check now available across the OS and deeply integrated in it, I want to know if I download a second or third language and also set my keyboard setting to type in that language if the Proofing Tools will be available for that language as well?

    and some suggestions

    1. Many people that speak two languages also write in two languages as well. In daily bases I am writing tones of letters in both Greek and English. I am continually switching between those two languages in Word. After installing the Proofing Tools for Office, Word can dynamically spell check my text in both languages without manually switching the spell check settings and this is great. Something that other programs are suffering to do. I would love to see that ability across the OS (especially in browser) and have Spell Check everywhere no matter what Language I type into. Windows 8 should be able to detect and switch the spell check settings automatically across the OS no matter what application is in use. (like Microsoft Word)

    2. You guys need to make sure this philosophy pass to phones with Windows Phone 8  🙂

    Thanks

  11. ZippyV says:

    What about extra language support for Speech Recognition and Text-To-Speech?

  12. Traveller says:

    The most annoying aspect of language support I come across personally is on the web.

    A large number of sites that I use daily (including MS sites) decide, based on my IP address, that I want to see the internet in the main language of the country where I happen to be at that moment – and it can be incredibly difficult to find you're way to the place to change the language.

    This isn't really Windows team's problem to solve, but it's like the people who build the most global tool we have (the web) doesn't realise that we live and work in a global world.

  13. domenicoav says:

    -8 to download #W8CP

    WOOOOOOOWW!!! 😀

  14. Nacimota says:

    Looks good. My question is will it be possible to get third party language packs? Could the community, for instance, easily create a "Pirate Speak" language pack ("Arr, swashbuckler.exe be walkin' the plank for it's unhandled Win32Exception, y'arr!")? It's a bit silly and pretty damn trivial as features go, but I'd be interested to know nonetheless (and I'm sure some bright spark in the community will think of a more useful purpose for such a feature).

    @Mayur Prayag ( India ):

    This blog post has absolutely nothing to do with IE… what are you doing here? Reading through your post, it seems like you just want Google Chrome (which is fair enough), so just use it. There's no reason to go complaining about it to a team that isn't responsible for its development on a blog post that has nothing to do with it.

  15. Lewin says:

    Thanks for letting us choose the language we prefer in every edition.

    In Italy I see several users lost as I say that if they want to change UI language, they have to buy the Windows Anytime Upgrade to Ultimate edition.

    A quick question: why EN-UK was considered as an entire Language Pack and not as a LIP based on EN-US?

  16. userX says:

    I would be pleased to see Na'vi language and Klingon on Windows 8,

    why not, why do you smile ???

  17. shankar says:

    This is awesome . Keep doing the g8 work.

  18. MUI user says:

    Is this limited to certain edition , same as Vista and 7 (enterprise/ultimate)? For years this is one of the "show stopper" for shops to upgrade from XP professional to Vista/7 professional because of the feature reduction.

    Is this also going to benefit WSUS infrastructure as well?

  19. Stefano says:

    This language thing is great for example if I wanted to buy a Windows 8 tablet from abroad (not all computers come to Italy, sometimes) or from the web, then I turn it into Italian  😉

    I don't understand the US or UK language difference in a PC.

    Does Windows use the words "gonna", "gotta", or "wanna"? LOL.

    "Windows is gonna restart" 😀

    Put "Yeah" instead of "Yes" in selection buttons, that would be more fun and would really differentiate US from UK language pack 🙂

  20. RP says:

    This all sounds great – and thank you for the UK edition!  

    @Stefano, Windows may not use "gonna" but it certainly uses "center", "color", "favorite".  Look in Control Panel.

  21. a lonely Windows Phone user! says:

    Would you please share your legendary knowledge and experience about multi-language packs & Internationalization support in Windows OS with Windows Phone OS team to speed up things in brining Tango update?

    You seriously need Arabic language support in Middle East and North Africa region to acquire some market share, where there is a crazily large clientele for iPhone and now people are going android way (esp. after the launch of Samsung S2). If you guys are not going to release Arabic speech recognition, then there is no point in delaying the release of Arabic language pack.

    I am alone in WP ecosystem on the street and since Microsoft is showing "don't know, don't care" attitude since 1yr and every tech-savvy I meet have impression like, if you become MS loyal customers soon they will abandon the product you purchased and expire it whenever they feel likely! Hence, there are chances they are going to abandon the support of the first generation device I purchased from US (in December 2010! right after its release), I guess I should continue to join the bandwagon riders and own an Android phone!

  22. @Steven Sinofsky – Can I install additional language during Windows installation? (At least one additional language).

  23. abdo says:

    oh thats really nice ..at first we were using just this way to change the laguage of windows 8..but today i this i will use this one.

    http://www.full-windows8.com/…/how-to-install-any-language-pack-for.html

  24. SH says:

    Will the British English standalone language be the default selection in the UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand markets? If yes, please include Brunei, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. They are former British colonies/protectorate and British English is the standard used.

  25. Eirik says:

    Does the Windows Update dialogue box from Windows XP really need to pop-up to show me that I'm downloading a language pack, instead of just showing a progress bar after the download button?

    "It's as easy as that"? I think you should have omitted the need to go into options to download the language pack, the option page seems to contain very little information. Keep it simple.

  26. RP says:

    "If there are no localized resources available at any time, we fall back to secondary choices and then to English. That used to be English US. But, now there’s English UK as well. Which do we fall back to? So far, planning for these scenarios is looking good."

    Just out of interest, is this language-dependent?  So if the preferred language is Welsh, would the fallback be English UK, whereas if the preferred language is Cherokee, the fallback would be English US?

  27. André says:

    How about having the same initiative for the Xbox Dashboard? I'm tired of using English on it because the only Portuguese option available is Brazilian! And I don't like (no offence intended) Brazilian Portuguese!

  28. Stefano says:

    @RP: ah ok, small differences. Maybe more differences would be in the Accessibility screen voice reader where you could hear the british accent, etc… I wonder if all languages will be downloadable in the Windows Consumer Preview of 29th February.

    Thank you.

  29. I completely agree with @Mobius Pizza. There are some applications that I use that aren't Unicode aware (PPS, a Chinese streaming TV application) for which I need to change my local to get the text to show up. However, I have other applications that aren't Unicode aware that are in English (too many to list) that get messed up with I set my local to China. I really need to be able to set a local override per application.

  30. I'm really happy to hear about these changes and I hope that the Ultimate version of Windows isn't necessary to get these extra languages. I find it funny how you mention in the article that a user may see 35 languages when they go to Windows Update. Until very recently I've never seen that because I haven't had the Ultimate version of Windows. Please remember that, comparatively speaking, almost no one buys the Ultimate version, so almost no one gets the option to change they language, EVER.

    I can't wait for your next post on text input. I also input several languages in a given day (English, Chinese, and Pinyin using Pinyinput). The default keyboard shortcuts interfere with Visual Studios keyboard shortcuts. It took me quite some time to figure out how to work around that issue, and it included registry editing because the keyboard shortcut changing option in the Control Panel is broken. I remember when I was in Korea, every single keyboard had an Alt/Gr key to the right of the space bar (the Alt key that is rarely used) that when pressed without another modifier key would rotate between the various installed IME's. I really hope that such a mechanism becomes more standard. Even if the key isn't labeled Alt/Gr it can still work the same way. Whatever way is chosen it must be universal so I can walk up to a PC in a library and type in my language and easily switch (think of the library in Chinatown).

    I also think enabling support for user-generated language packs is also an incredibly good idea. Windows is so popular that I'm sure there would be plenty of support for the creation and maintenance of such packs. I know big FOSS projects get a lot of language support. Especially considering that of the 7.5 billion people on earth your 109 languages will only help 4.5 read in their native tongue is the idea of a user-generated language pack pretty much a must for those other 3 billion people, otherwise they'll never get a computer, table, or phone from Microsoft.

  31. davis says:

    Oh My God: English English.

    @all Re "other Englishes": as a display language, there's really only US English and UK English anyway. For proofing (ie spellcheck), Microsoft already offers good English regional proofing support in Microsoft Office and I would expect that regional proofing support (noting that proofing support in general is already announced for Windows 8 and for IE10 on Windows 7) would make the transition into Windows without difficulty.

  32. Abhishek Gupta says:

    A Browser of a OS works simply like a necklace of a lady. But I m also highly dissapointed with the heaviness of IE.

    Let c what MS is doing with IE 10.

    why can't u recreate a Webkit based IE engine, Infact IE of Windows Phone is fat better as compared to desktop.

    I wish to see IE on top of the world very soon but current situation shows that Google first entered in Browser world, then Smart Phone  and then Google will definately make u out of the desktop business by presenting a mix a Chromium Os and Android OS for desktop,laptop, tablet. .But still I hope that day should never come. All the best IE team.

  33. markus says:

    Why do you have to make an extra click to get to the "download and install language pack" button?

    Wouldn't it be easier and faster to have a extra download button in the "Options" column if the language is available to download?

  34. Gytis says:

    Hey, little suggestion, microsoft could make ribbon metro style, here how i think it could look like:

    http://i.imgur.com/20Ywh.jpg

    Just suggestion..

    On topic, will languages going to be only available with windows 8 ultimate?

  35. Andre says:

    Microsoft neglected IE and pay a high price for it.

    Please give us a adblock for IE.

    Google is abusing the other of our privacy and need an answer.

  36. de@iru.ch says:

    I live in Switzerland but use an English Windows installation (mostly because the German translated expressions are unfamiliar and funny to me). The locale is set to Switzerland (German).

    Most 3rd party applications that use language auto-detection show a German user interface instead of English, because my Regional Settings are set to "German (Switzerland)". I would expect that applications use whatever language Windows uses to show its UI.

    Also, it's weird that day's and month's names are translated to German when the rest of the UI is in English (with "German(Switzerland)" as date and time format and "English" as UI language. I'd expect "Tuesday, 21. February 2012" as long date).

    Can Microsoft do something about this?

  37. Hurrah for UK English Windows at last, now I can have Windows in my favourite colours and my favourite language!

  38. ali says:

    @ Microsoft

    Please fix the Persian Calender/Format.

    In Windows 7, When i select Persian format, instead of Persian (iranian) Format , Windows show me Arabic format.

    Persian format != Arabic format

    And please make better/more beautiful fonts for Persian language.

  39. JR says:

    A common problem for Canadians happens when you reseal a computer using SysPrep in that even if you install Windows and customize the language settings to English(Canada) with strictly a US keyboard, SysPrep/OOBE will reinstall the Canadian Multilingual and French(Canada) keyboards – even when you remove them in Audit Mode.  I don't understand the reasoning behind this.  If an OEM ships one keyboard with a Canadian computer and it's US English, why have the additional layouts installed by default?  Windows should only ever need one keyboard layout installed – unless the user chooses to install additional ones manually.  Choosing particular language settings shouldn't install more than one keyboard.  This has been an issue that has been present at least as far back as XP.

  40. domenicoav says:

    @Mayur Prayag ( India )

    LOOOL; Internet Explorer 9 is AWESOME, Chrome is very slow 😀 , but i want in IE10 Bookmark sync like chrome 😉 the rest is futile (like google)

    @Max

    Because Mac user have Big Hard disk 😀 LOOOL; this is the best idiots post of all time,  Why would you waste memory unnecessarily?

  41. I was happy to get Nepali language support in WIndows 7. And I hope there are more things to expect for nepali language enhancements in windows 8. However, I have an issue. The default font size of the nepali language is very small compared to  english font size and not readable. One has to use magnifier to understand the texts. The same issues applies in hotmail and other sites too. The font size is so small that we can not understand it without zooming the page. So, I hope you will contact with the microsoft certified engineers from nepal to look into the matter.

    Looking forward to your positive response.

  42. Dominic says:

    I hope that you are planning to make that available in the metro environment.  People working on a tablet (a lot of what w8 will be for) don't want to switch into the desktop.  It looks old fashioned in comparison and isn't as touchable.

  43. Paul Kemp says:

    Will there be a price assosiated with this function? Or can any user of any version of Win 8 install whatever languange version they would want?

  44. coder543 says:

    "we have reimagined the display language experience"

    You're kidding me, right?

    Right??

    Please tell me no one believed that statement. Ubuntu has had full and complete translation switching on all versions for years, just as Mac has as well. Let's not even mention the fact that Windows Ultimate could do it to. They are just now realizing they've made years worth of mistakes regarding this and are touting it as revolutionary. I am very displeased with this article… the ones before it were much better.

  45. Hope to see also support for EN-GB in Office 15.

  46. So… Will these languages be available in non Ultimate editions? because if not, your efforts are being wasted, and secondly, will they be removable?

  47. @Bastian92, Great Britain has been OOBE supported for a very long time. I've ran across that setting hundreds of times in Office and Windows. -___-

  48. RP says:

    @BumbleBritches57, is it available as a UI display language, though, or only a spell check language?  Afaik it's the latter.

  49. Nicos says:

    I want to report an existing bug in Windows 7 with the Switch Language keyboard shortcut, by default that being alt+shift.

    When you install more than one keyboard (input method) for a single language, the Switch Language shortcut does not switch among them. So, for example, if you install two languages, English and Greek, and for the Greek language you add two keyboards, the default Greek keyboard and the Greek Polyphonic keyboard, then alt+shift switches only between the English and the Greek keyboard, but it skips the Greek Polyphonic keyboard. In other words, the Switch Language keyboard shortcut should be re-worked to become the Switch Keyboard shortcut, so that if I have more than one keyboard per language I would be able to get to it easily.

    Please fix this as it is very annoying when I need to have more than one keyboard for a given language and there is no easy way to switch to it.

  50. "focusing on making additional display languages available to all Windows users"

    Does that mean you can switch languages if you don't have Windows 8 Ultimate?  This seems like base functionality that ought to be included in the most basic versions of Windows.

    Also in Windows 7, if you don't have Ultimate, you can't install additional full languages, but you *can* install LIPs.  So my ability as a non-Ultimate user to install another language depends on whether it's a LIP or not.  That's just dumb and confusing to the user, who doesn't know or care what a LIP is.

    The new user interface looks great, just be sure that it's usable by the 90% of users who don't buy Ultimate version.

    Your example of using Spanish and English in the United States on a single family's computer is a good one.  Many bilingual families – especially ones who have to share a PC and would most benefit from this feature – are not going to have the money to spend on upgrading to Windows Ultimate (especially at a price of > $130 to upgrade!!).  They will live with the inconvenience of using English-only or Spanish-only rather than pay for the upgrade.  That results in a badly degraded user experience.

    On that note, there are other dumb distinctions between Windows Ultimate and lesser versions of Windows.  For example, the lack of Windows Aero effects when using Remote Desktop with non-Ultimate versions of Windows makes the Windows product look more unprofessional.  If you want to keep up good appearances with your product, you need to address core appearance issues like this language issue and the remote desktop issue I just mentioned in ALL versions of Windows – not just the expensive ones.

  51. Windows already had the Valencian language… it was called Catalan XD

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Catalan_language

    And I don't understand why it has to be a LIP and not a standalone language… most of Catalan speakers don't even know what is a LIP and never will install it!

  52. Oh, Idk about that, I always assumed it was a display language, and remind me of the differences between britain english and regular english.

  53. @Moderator says:

    @Steven Sinofsky, does this blog have a moderator? Please delete multiple blog comments on multiple blog posts from Mayur Prayag the spammer. It is annoying to other readers to read the offtopic and spam comments.

  54. For that matter, you've got to simplify the number of product SKUs.  It seems that each new version of Windows NT adds more SKUs, and therefore more confusion.

    Windows NT 3.x:  you had Windows NT Pro, and Server

    Windows NT 4:  you had the previous, plus Advanced Server and Terminal Server

    Windows 2000: you removed Terminal Server (yay!)

    Windows XP / Server 2003: you added XP Home (but to be fair, this was the upgrade to the non-NT version of Windows), and more server versions I didn't keep track of.

    Up to this point, the client versions of Windows were simple to keep track of:  there was XP Home for consumer users (or Windows 9x in the past, before Win XP).  Business users used NT Workstation / XP Professional.  The number of server versions was already starting to get out of control, so I'll leave them out of the story here.

    Windows Vista / 7: you went from 2 versions to 6: Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, Ultimate.  Are you kidding me?!  What's wrong with Windows 7 Home, and Windows 7 Professional?

    How is the average purchaser of a computer supposed to know about the difference between these editions when even I don't fully know all the differences?

    And it sounds like you're on track to splinter the Windows product even more with Windows 8.  What are we going to see?  Further splintering based on architecture too?  Windows 8 x86/64 Starter, Windows 8 Home Basic (x86), Windows 8 Home Premium (x64), Windows 8 Professional (x64), Windows 8 Enterprise (x64), Windows 8 Ultimate (x64), Windows on ARM Home Premium, Windows on ARM Professional, Windows on ARM Ultimate, Windows Phone 8 Basic, Windows Phone 8 Ultimate?

    For comparison, Apple seems to offer a single product.  It's called Mac OS X Lion.  I don't see any comparison between editions – it's all just one edition as far as I can tell.  Two if you count iOS – then there's OS X, and iOS.

    Part of the reason Apple is so successful is they limit the choices offered to an "ignorant" user.  Limited selection of computers for example – they find a configuration that works for most users and go with it.  This is an area you could simplify things back to how they were.

  55. Home Premium edition user says:

    Only one question: language packs are installable on any SKU, or on Ultimate only?

  56. I agree, they need to stop this bullshit. every single device is capable of Aero, not that they care with Metro anyway. Make windows 8 "Ultimate" and simply call it "Windows 8" or "Windows 8 Home" if nessacary.

    This is simple *** peopel, you over think everything to death. simply sit back, and listen to your feelings, they're mch more intune than your mind could be. Not to sound like a weirdo or anything, but be a little intuative willya?

  57. Stefano says:

    That's right, Microsoft, Steven Sinofsky, or whoever, you must reduce the number of Editions of Windows. It's not possible to have a mess on the market, please have some respect for consumers who pay a lot of money for your (unfortunately always full of bugs) products, lower prices and don't be greedy this time. At least for Windows 8, do it. Please.

    1) No more Starter edition

    2) Home Edition at a lower price than the past Windows editions

    3) No more Ultimate Edition (if possible, include everything in the Professional Edition)

    Do you agree?

  58. pmbAustin says:

    Can you be more clear about the distinction between a "Stand Alone Language" and a "Language Interface Pack"?  I'm a bit unclear here.  For example, why isn't Spanish a "Standa Alone Langauge", but English-UK is?  I'm just trying to understand the difference between the two and why a distinction is being made.

    BTW, I think it's excellent that any Win8 user will be able to select any langauge they want for the display, and that if you configure two accounts on the same system, each can operate in a different language.

    I do share the same question as others though:  What is the "Metro" UI for this?  And how fast/easy is it to truly switch on the fly?  I assume it doesn't require a reboot or anything… mostly I'm concerned about this scenario:  Someone switches my display language to Chinese… which I don't understand.  How easy is it for me to switch it back to english without being super-familiar with the UI (i.e. having the path to the langauge settings memorized)?  Just thinking about recovering from the inevitable practical jokes…

  59. Asbjørn says:

    This is truly great news. I hope we can expect more of that kind.

    @Blai: That is exactly the point. If you'd actually read the post, you'd know that the distinction is going away.

  60. SiPlus says:

    >> Mayur Prayag

    > India

    This explains everything. Go back coding your 9001-line "hello, world".

  61. SiPlus says:

    Bad idea. Make everyone speak the same language. Globalization FTW.

  62. Waseem says:

    What about the support of languages within apps? do developers have to write extra code to enable this or will it be automatically enabled?

    an example is a photos app, can this app display file names that are written in another language correctly out of the box?

  63. @Waseem developers have to provide their own locals based on where they target their applications. Microsoft isn't going to provide a "translation" pack; this would be very complicating with an unnecessary overhead.

  64. ReMark says:

    @siPlus

    Windows 8 is for everybody, also for who doesn't know english. 😉

    and I totally agree Stefano's message: one million editions totally confuse users, and I can't stand to see Windows mutilated.

  65. Noel says:

    Hopefully, This will mean that less people get their installation screwed by hacking MUI LP's into consumer versions, and end up with 'non-genuine' notifications as a result.

  66. B8Blog says:

    @pmbAustin and a few others..  there is a language switching UI right off the charms next to volume and shutdown–super easy to get to.  It is also on the on screen keyboard.  The desktop control panel is the place you install the languages the first time you use them, which is not something you do very often (or just once).  In addition, the language settings you choose roam between PCs so you just set them one time for Windows 8 on once machine and use the same connected ID across PCs.

    Sorry, the post should have included the picture.  In the //build/ keynote demo that I did I showed this switching.

  67. ReMark says:

    There is no a out-of-topic space so… I'll write this here:

    Finally your attention is not only on Metro UI or Skydrive or Ribbon.

    I just write some general suggestions that could be done in few days of your work, but that ADD great value (imho) to the "classic" Windows:

    – users want choice, so options to customize style and behaviors are very appreciated;

    – an INTERNAL TOOL to edit voices of the file context menu (right-click on a file) to add/del/edit "Send To" menu and other voices like "Winzip > add …" in a easy way (wizard to add voices for a specific file action in the context menu)   [for users that have no experience using the registry and don't want to navigate in all the */shell/ voices]

    – an option in every window in the screen to put a window in the foreground (in front of all the windows when the window has no focus)

    – Zoom tool: cool thing on W7,  scroll wheel for adjust the zoom could be appreciated (WIN+ mouse scroll wheel)

    – Recording screen/ screen capture tool: a simple tool like Snipping tool for record in .wmv or other compression could be VERY appreciated

    – Clipboard tool: it's a clipboard manager that traces clipboard datas (user can enable/disable this tool)

    – Multidesktop (MULTIPLE WORKSPACES!) is like to have multimonitors, but only "logical" not real monitor.

    – A complete SYSTEM INFO/DEVICE MANAGER window (where is my RAM specs? sensors? s.m.a.r.t. tags?)

    I want to see these details out of the box (like mac os since … 2003?) WITHOUT 3rd parts softwares

    – Uninstaller/Maintanance tool that also deletes registry leftovers, so that there are no 3rd programs like Revo are needed anymore (VERY IMPORTANT, REGISTRY IS FULL OF old unused voices)

    Others little things…

    – the folder view preference does not reset and gets saved for every folder (on w7 this make me mad)

    – ability to read other useful Filesystems (not write, but at least READ)

    – espelling usb storages and "impossible to do, same program is using a file in this storage" and there is NO PROGRAM USING THAT STORAGE and the clipboard is EMPTY, this problem damages my liver everytime so SHOW WHAT FILE is in use and WHAT PROGRAM/Process is using that file (this is a good idea!!).

    – (!!!) I hope you refresh some dialogs, there are dialogs in there strait out of Windows 95…

    Also I can't see the name "Apps" in the Metro UI, that word "apps" is so apple that make me feel bad. 🙁

    Do you want a REIMAGINED Windows? Start following the right path above to reach the greatness.

    C'mon, you have the time and we have the hope. 😉  Good work.

  68. Waseem says:

    @nightdev

    Actually that wasn't my question! my question was whether a twitter client for example is able to pull tweets in Arabic -let's say- and display them correctly without extra coding?

  69. Andrew F says:

    Too many steps to add a new language — Windows should prompt me to automatically download and switch the primary language as soon as I add it. Otherwise, users will only add the language, and be confused why everything is still in the default language.

    Also, since language updates don't take effect until you log out and sign back in, Windows should prompt you to do that right away as well.

  70. Man that's nice 🙂 Windows 8  is perfect but seriously Mr.Steven the IE Team is not doing well to the IE, I agree with Mayur Prayag, IE is slow. .besides it's not a primary browser for many users.. please tell them that they need to re-buid it from zero in order to make it successful

  71. SimonT says:

    I agree with some comment here. Keeping this features for Entreprise and Ultimate is a waste. This feature should be build in all version of Windows (Starter to Ultimiate)

  72. One very nice change I noticed in Windows 8 Developer Preview is that the keyboard shortcut for switching input languages is now Win+Space – nicer key combination that won't be triggered accidentally and it's a global change! It should always have been like that! In previous versions of Windows, it was not a global change but per-app so for every app where you wanted to enter text, you had to change the Input language repeatedly.

    On the IE blog, MS announced Windows 8 will have system wide spell check (blogs.msdn.com/…/typing-with-speed-and-accuracy-in-ie10.aspx) but it does not clarify if it also means desktop apps or just Metro style apps. Will desktop apps like WordPad and Notepad also get spell check with red squiggle underline due to it being system wide? And what languages are supported by spell check?

    Microsoft needs to expand the languages for which MUI packs are available, not just Language Interface Packs. Since Windows 2000, I have craved for MUI support for Indic languages. Considering, Microsoft India is the biggest MS operations outside of USA (even has a Research facility), with the exception of MS Japan, full MUI support for all Indic languages should be a priority. There are only LIPs.

    Is there any increased support for Text to Speech languages, aka languages in which Narrator and screen readers can speak. Localized voices are so out of reach and hard to find. What about increased handwriting recognition language support?

    I have a suggestion for helping users find and filter all the relevant fonts by their language of choice. For example, when I switch my keyboard layout to Devnagari, I have a choice of many Devnagari fonts but it is hard to find from a huge list of installed fonts, which fonts support Devnagari script. This limits my usage of the fonts to just the ones I know that have been around since Windows 2000 and XP. I don't wish to remember font names, just let me discover the fonts for my language more easily.

    Why not ship the excellent transliteration tools MS has for various languages like Indic languages (specials.msn.co.in/…/Hindi.aspx), Cyrillic, Arabian with the OS? For Indic languages, the default keyboard layout should be the MS ILIT transliteration one, instead of Inscript as it is extremely easy and revolutionary for character entry.

    And how about support for more alternate clocks in more time zones in Date/Time Control panel? Two aren't enough. The old Microsoft Time Zone utility for XP supported up to 5 clocks.

    When are we going to see more use of system features making use of Extended Linguistic Services (ELS) APIs?

  73. "The desktop control panel is the place you install the languages the first time you use them, which is not something you do very often (or just once)."

    I know it hasn't really been announced yet, but what about Windows Phone 8?  Does WP8 include the desktop like Windows on ARM does?  If not, how will the user add languages?

    The answer shouldn't be "it's a Windows phone single-user device, just buy the phone in the correct language".  My dumbphone from Verizon offers me a choice of Spanish and English, and I've seen other dumbphones offer more choices than that.

  74. Morten says:

    Where's t' pirate language? Ayely pirate be a bigger language than many o' these. Arrrrrrrrr

  75. R Huss says:

    For enterprises will the display language features be free or seperately licensed?

  76. SL says:

    this is great but why can't you let me pick the metro background image? I mean you let me change the language but a simple jpg is too much?

  77. Fail says:

    Article that doesn't realise that "gotten" isn't used in modern British English is a fail.

  78. @Fail says:

    a very valid reason why we should bye mac! how stew-pid of you!

  79. Afshinb2 says:

    What about other localization options? For example if I change my language to Persian there is no way to set the calendar to Persian Calendar (en.wikipedia.org/…/Iranian_calendars). Only Hijri Calendar (en.wikipedia.org/…/Islamic_calendar) is supported which is not used in my country. Supporting additional calendars would be so appreciated.

  80. Traveller said: "A large number of sites that I use daily (including MS sites) decide, based on my IP address, that I want to see the Internet in the main language of the country where I happen to be at that moment.."

    Please, Please, don't do like Google: I live in a Spanish language country, but I install software ONLY in English. I don't want any software to use Spanish. I have to change Google (using /ncr: I DON'T want it to store any cookie in my machine), and they don't allow me to do that in options, so I have to change it continuously. Let the user take control of the machine, please, don't assume you know better than they…

  81. @Steven Sinofsky, could you not use "super" so much? It's super annoying.

  82. John says:

    How about trying Windows 8 instead?

    Get your Windows 8 Key/Serial at http://windows8keygen.com

    Enjoy!

  83. In some places Microsoft did localited too much. (lets say why rename local computer groups? why not just give them new name but keep original global names too)

    Some scripts that Microsoft release does not work in all languages. Why scripts should care about language? You did make mistake. Do not make it again.

    It is just not good we need rememer SID for admin account etc. Any reports shoud be "global" also. (if I send msinfo32 report to you with my Finnish language, can you read it? YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT IT SAYS)

  84. Daniel D says:

    What about russian speech recognizer? Will it be included?

  85. Mark says:

    @Steven Sinofsky: please, could you change Valencian? It is called Catalan!

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Catalan_language

    Valencian is only a dialect!

  86. Good grief says:

    Whilst not wanting to appear rude, for the love of god there's no such things "UK English". It's just English, of course there are other variations around the world, (such as US English) however the English, in England speak English with no other qualification.

    It's like saying you live in American America… /sigh

  87. Very interested in learning about TTS and Speech Reco language support, particular as it relates to accessibility.

  88. Quppa says:

    So, which display languages will be freely downloadable and which will we have to pay for? You write that you want to enable more users to install additional languages than before, which suggests support won't be restricted to the most expensive SKUs as it is in Vista/7, but then there's the bit about standalone languages being sold as boxed software.

    Will you write about the new Language Bar in a future post? I haven't used it extensively yet, but I like that the style matches the rest of the taskbar now, and good riddance to the non-standard menus found in the Vista/7 Language Bar. On the other hand, the weirdness of the Japanese IME Pad remains (strange tooltips, buttons – even the window's close button – have no hover state, the menus are drawn without theming, etc.), at least in the Windows Developer Preview.

    Also, will the new Language Bar be backwards compatible with the Microsoft Office IME 2010 in future builds? As of the Windows Developer Preview, one has to enable the legacy Language Bar to make the Office IME usable – with the new version, the input mode and other vital information is not displayed.

  89. Very interesting timing for this post. Given that this post was published at 12:01 in the morning, I'm guessing that this post was written a while ago and was set to automatically publish one minute after UNESCO's International Mother Language Day began.

  90. Red Daniel says:

    Fine! It's a great idea for italian children!!

  91. what says:

    Wait, Valencian? Really? That's Catalan! Why do you split this in two languages? That will be like putting Washingtonian or Bostonian, it's totally useless

  92. Josh says:

    I hope I don't have to restart Windows each time I change the language. Bloody annoying.

  93. Stanley Chan says:

    Will there be any news about including the Colemak ergonomic keyboard layout? (see http://www.colemak.com/)

    Almost nearly all *nixes include a form of this layout already — even Mac OS X (despite not being the /exact/ version of the layout)!!

    Please, if Microsoft does this, I will be happy camper for the rest of Windows 8. I am already happy with most of the stuff I see, but the lack of Colemak built into Windows is a huge hindrance to my productivity and overall user satisfaction. It would be greatly appreciated if this can be done (by myself and many other Colemak users — amongst us are computer and keyboard enthusiasts too, we're one of the only keyboard layouts to have an active community going!).

  94. It's ridiculous that it has taken this long for Microsoft to properly support UK English. I hate seeing terms like "personalize" ('z' instead of 's'), "color" (instead of 'colour') and others littered around. It's hard to understate how damaging this is to culture, especially to young children who simply don't understand the difference. So while I very much appreciate it being added I just cannot praise you for something that should have been included decades ago.

    As for languages, I've always found it strange that Microsoft tried to treat them as a high-end feature. It really does strike me as trying to fleece your customers when languages packs were only included in the Ultimate version of Vista, while – tangentially – moving them all to Windows Update in Win7 was equally baffling. Language is absolutely critical to a person's ability to use the operating system and I'm glad that Microsoft has finally acknowledged this.

    @Steven Sinofsky – I appreciate that you only recently took over the Windows division, so you can't be held responsible for faults prior to that. In fact, already I think you've done a great job of getting down to basics. All too often Microsoft has chased the killer features and ignores basic aspects, like managing Fonts or leaving icons from Windows 95 or even earlier. Keep up the good work.

    But please can you add tabs to Explorer? Prior to Win7 I would quickly switch between folder windows by clicking the taskbar. Win7 introduced grouping, which while great for most things is absolutely horrific for navigating folders or using IE. With Chrome I can simply click on the icon and then select my tab (tabs being easy to locate because they're opened in order); with Explorer (and IE) I have to click the icon, then browse the preview and select the one I want – when they look the same I have to hover over, check it and then move the mouse away if it's the wrong window. If Explorer included tabs I could simply click the taskbar icon and the click through to the tab I wanted from its position. Both IE and Explorer should still include the hover over previews but clicking the icon should go immediately to the application, or at the very least the last active window. If I click Explorer or IE it should default to the last window, not the preview.

    There really is no excuse for Windows Explorer not having tabs. Even applications like Photoshop include tabs. Oh, and Explorer defaulting to Libraries in Win7 was pretty annoying; launching My Computer (even if you have to redesign it) would be much more practical or include an option. The only reason I even use the Start Menu any more is to click 'Computer'.

  95. Good news for us in India. I wish there was Urdu as well.

  96. Oh, I am sorry! It is already there, even for Windows7.

  97. raymond says:

    I hope you guys don't make the desktop too glassy or too flat like metro. The way how you have it like with the zune application with a little more 2.5D and shading would be nice. Like the chrome of the buttons of the zune program would be nice. Not too much like the aero of windows 7 and not so flat like the boringness of metro. Please also reconsider the look of the tiles they are overly flat and boring. (on the windows phone and windows 8) Hopefully you guys touch it up before the release of the next version of windows phone and windows 8.

  98. "We are proud to announce the addition of English for the United Kingdom to the list of Windows display languages." "We believe that this version of Windows will also be widely used in India, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, the Republic of Ireland and many other places."

    Perhaps, although i can't see UK-English getting much use in Australia. In fact even Australian-English is problematical for Australia. This is because most Australians under the age of about 40 (and increasingly so with decreasing age) actually speak and write a dialect i would call Australian-US-English. Put another way, 'pure' Australian-English is atrophying. For example, @Alan Burchll said "we spell Jail… Gaol", but i doubt that is the case for most young Australians. I spell it 'jail'. I spell 'centre', 'center', 'colour', 'color', 'favourite', favorite', and 'standardise', 'standardize'. (This is not due to 'cultural conditioning' – i prefer these US spellings.)

    Sounds like i need to use US-English instead of Australian-English, right? Not quite that simple, however. Outside North America, 'aluminum' is spelt (and pronounced) 'aluminium'. Now that word is unlikely to appear in any UI, but i wouldn't want a system-wide spell-checker correcting 'aluminium' to 'aluminum'. So there are exceptions. This means that a system-wide dictionary could allow me exactly the setup i want – a user profile default of US-English, but also the opportunity to change spellings for some localized words. Also, if i'm setting up Windows manually, i would want en-AU as my user-locale, not en-US. (However, i prefer the international date-time format. Looking forward to the post covering locales and regional settings).

    "Select the language you want from the list. In these screenshots, I’m selecting Hindi. This list is long. Luckily, it’s filterable."

    Unluckily, the dialog box is unnecessarily small, requiring excessive scrolling if the user is not comfortable using the filtering feature. What is it with tiny dialog boxes containing scroll bars?

    General feature request for Windows 8: Increase the size of all dialog boxes that contain scroll bars at the minimum recommended screen resolution (1366×768), to a size that is just adequate to eliminiate the scroll bar(s), with a maximum dialog size of half the screen width, and maximised in the vertical dimension. Any dialog that reaches this maximum size, should be snapped left or right to minimize overlap of other windows, and to make the UX a little more like that of the Metro environment.

    "You can monitor progress of the download and installation"

    Other than possibly the above point, the language installation dialog is very well designed. It provides good feedback to the user with both text and a progress bar. Windows Setup and Windows Update should closely follow this example! I find stuff like "Installing updates", or "Installing update 1 of X" very annoying. What updates? What is the install status of these updates? Why won't the system tell me what is going on in some detail? I'm the administrator of this machine, for f^(k's sake!

    @Steven Sinofsky – "there is a language switching UI right off the charms next to volume and shutdown–super easy to get to.  It is also on the on screen keyboard."

    All good, but when using a physical keyboard, a specific language-switching key would be ideal, rather than requiring users to memorize a keyboard sequence, or 'chord', as i believe they are more correctly known. Please tell me Microsoft is designing a new 110-120 key keyboard standard to replace the aging 101 standard that dates back to the mid-1980s, and which includes single-key options for language, clipboard, search, power and volume functions. End-users with 23"+ and/or two or more monitors can surely afford the space of an extended keyboard layout.

    "Sorry, the post should have included the picture."

    Would anyone mind if the post was updated to include this?

    Will language packs be available from the Windows Store?

    People, you should avoid installing language packs you don't require, and read Joseph Conway's response @ blogs.technet.com/…/do-you-really-need-all-of-those-language-packs.aspx to @Tomas – "Is there a recomendation/limit on how many language packs you could have installed." – which presumably holds for Windows 8 also.

  99. Peter Constable [MSFT] says:

    @trukhinyuri

    You asked, "What about phonetic russian keyboard?"

    If you mean a keyboard layout for Russian that is mapped in a mnemonic manner for people using hardware keyboards with QWERTY keycaps, that is available in Windows 8. If you add Russian to your profile in the Language control panel, you can go into the language options for that language, select “Add an input method”, and choose “Russian – Mnemonic”.

  100. Peter Constable [MSFT] says:

    @Drewfus

    You quoted from the blog,

    "Select the language you want from the list. In these screenshots, I’m selecting Hindi. This list is long. Luckily, it’s filterable."

    Then commented,

    "Unluckily, the dialog box is unnecessarily small, requiring excessive scrolling if the user is not comfortable using the filtering feature."

    Note that the window for adding a language is resizable and can be maximized to fill your screen, if you'd like.

  101. Peter Constable [MSFT] says:

    @Wilin, Bastian92, N1kos, Dominic

    There were questions about whether language preferences could be changed within the Metro environment. The answer is, Not at this time: language preferences can only be set in the Desktop Control Panel.

  102. @Bastian92

    You asked, "So when you support EN-UK  with Win8 now, there will be built in ISOs with that lp?" Yes: that was alluded to in the blog post (“can be purchased as boxed software”).

  103. There were various questions related to spell checking. We'll probably discuss that and other language-related features of Windows 8 in more detail in a future blog post. For now, some quick responses:

    Support for spell checking is different from the Windows UI display language and language packs. You don't need to have a language pack for a given language installed to have spell checking support for that language. (@Alan Burchll: we don't have a language pack for Australian English, but spell checking for Australian English is supported.) Spell checking is tied to the input language. So, for instance, if you enable a German keyboard (by adding it to your list of languages in the Language control panel), then select that keyboard from the input switching UI (StevenSi mentioned this in a comment above), then whatever you type will get German spell checking applied to it.

  104. MUI user says:

    Even a windows phone 7.5 has multiple language out of box, I wonder why MUI is only available in enterprise/ultimate edition of windows.

  105. @Traveller, Freddy H:

    You both commented about issues with language negotiation on the Web. Indeed, there are some real annoyances in this area. For instance, I have found it very frustrating to be travelling in another country—say, Japan—and to go to a Web site for a company located back in Canada or the US and for that Web site to come up in Japanese simply because my current IP address was in Japan.

    Language preferences on the Internet are an interesting challenge. Internet protocols such as HTTP have had the ability to convey language preferences from a browser back to a server since the mid 90s. Yet these mechanisms are still poorly used. As a result, Web developers have resorted to other means to determine what content language to use; but clearly those mechanisms often don't work well.

    A likely root cause is that users are often unaware of browser settings where they can indicate their language preferences, and so the information passed to the server is some default, probably often en-US (U.S. English). Because this information hasn't been reliable, Web developers have all-too-often gotten used to ignoring it.

    Somewhat related to this, we think it's a problem that, currently, users often have to set language preferences in many places: for Windows, in different apps they've installed on their local system, and on different Web sites.

    In Windows 8, we want to start solving these problem by having one place where the user indicates their language preferences: the Language control panel. In particular, the languages that you add to your profile in the control panel will be communicated by IE to the Web site using the mechanisms built into the HTTP protocol.

    Now, that certainly doesn't mean that every Web site will immediately respond to your language preferences the way you'd like. But it does start to fill in a critical gap in how the Web was meant to work but that has been missing; and hopefully Web developers will start to design their sites to respond accordingly.

  106. danielgr says:

    As a Spanish person living in Japan after having lived in France and with a Japanese wife while using my windows in English, all I can say is THANK YOU!

    others mentioned points I would also like to improve on but, in any case, you said already that more is coming and I'll take this posts as a statement in that you are now finally taking global people's global needs seriously. So I'll keep my rants for when you've unveiled the whole thing.

  107. @Nacimota (and others with similar questions):

    You asked,

    "My question is will it be possible to get third party language packs? Could the community, for instance, easily create a 'Pirate Speak' language pack?"

    Third-party language packs are not supported at this time. (But a Pirate English language pack does sound cool, though. ☺)

  108. @Ali—you commented, "And please make better/more beautiful fonts for Persian language." Note that Windows 8 now includes a Nastaliq style font for Perso-Arabic script: Urdu Typesetting Regular. We’d be interested to hear how well this meets the needs of Persian users (as well as Urdu users).

  109. @gr3en Chkl8: You commented on the font for the Nepali language pack on Windows 7. In Windows 8, we are using a new UI font for various scripts of South Asia: Nirmala UI. Hopefully this will improve legibility of UI for the Windows 8 Nepali language pack.

  110. @JamesJohnston: you commented on confusion for Windows 7 users between "full languages" (aka "language packs") and "LIPs" (aka "language interface packs"). You added, "That's just dumb and confusing to the user, who doesn't know or care what a LIP is."

    We agree!

    @pmbAustin asked a related question: "Can you be more clear about the distinction between a "Stand Alone Language" and a "Language Interface Pack"?"

    There's a technical distinction between a full / standalone "language pack" (LP) and a "language interface pack" (LIP): a LP includes a string resource for each and every string used in the Windows UI (including every error message, no matter how rare and obscure). In contrast, a LIP only includes a subset of the UI strings; for that reason, a LIP is not standalone: it must be used in conjunction with a LP to ensure that every string resource can be displayed in some form if necessary.

    Now, that's a technical detail that typical users really shouldn't have to be concerned with.

    There is another difference between LPs and LIPs that has to do with how many of the strings actually get translated for languages other than English. Now, obviously, since a LIP doesn't include every UI string, it follows that a LIP doesn't provide translations for every string.  

    That also is a detail that shouldn't impact a typical user: it will mean that some rarely-seen error message isn’t translated—but, after all, that rarely-seen error message probably wouldn’t have meant much even if it had been translated. (And, of course, we try to avoid that rarely-seen error message from ever being displayed in the first place.)

    The fact that the LP/LIP distinction is something that users shouldn't have to worry about is one of the motivations for the changes we're making in this space in Windows 8: in Windows 7, it mattered because you had to go through Windows Update for LPs, but you had to go to the Download Center for LIPs. As JamesJohnston said, that's just dumb and confusing. The solution for Windows 8 is that you go to one place, the Language control panel, to obtain language packs, and you (mostly*) never need to know whether something is a LP or LIP—or even know that there's a difference at all.

    *The caveat is because LIPs still do depend on a LP, and there are particular some language dependencies involved in that. For instance, if you want to install Quechua, which is a LIP, then you need to have the Spanish LP on the system first. That's a constraint, but many users will likely already have the necssary LP on their system and so there will not be any issue.

  111. hamakaze(from japan) says:

    Windows Explorer is like no no related articles and then comment.

    So come in 8 standard Explorer is conventional UI version alone good, think standard, I want to thank you with tab feature. Come study.

    But recently such free software it seems, too many put too obnoxious in regards is.

  112. @Josh:

    "I hope I don't have to restart Windows each time I change the language."

    You never have to restart Windows or log off/on to change your input / keyboard language. You do have to log off/on if you change the Windows UI display language, but you don't have to restart.

    There may be cases when a language pack is first installed that a restart is required; if so, that's because some language packs also include additional components that require a restart. But that is a one-time thing. Once the language pack is installed, then changing the UI display language only requires a log off/on.

  113. @Waseem: In one post you asked,

    "What about the support of languages within apps? do developers have to write extra code to enable this or will it be automatically enabled?"

    Then in a subsequent post, you asked,

    "my question was whether a twitter client for example is able to pull tweets in Arabic -let's say- and display them correctly without extra coding?"

    I'm not sure if you meant to ask about one issue or two. The blog was about language packs, which have to do with UI strings; and so your first question could have been about that in relation to apps. But the second issue is definitely a different issue. I'll comment a bit on both, starting with the latter.

    An app like a twitter client is handling user-generated text. Every Windows system is capable of displaying text in many different languages and scripts. You don't need to install any add-on component or change any settings, and it doesn't matter what the Windows UI display language is. This has been the case since Windows XP SP2. You can find a detailed discussion of what scripts are supported in different Windows versions on the MSDN site: msdn.microsoft.com/…/bb688099.

    Now, whether an app has to write extra code to enable this scenario can depend on a few different things. One is how the text is encoded: Windows uses Unicode, which is an industry standard that supports encoding text in all of the world's languages. If the app uses Unicode, and if the feed coming from the cloud service is using Unicode, then there may be no extra code needed by the app. Another key factor is whether the app is using text controls provided by Windows or if they have written their own: if they have written there own control, then there is quite a lot of code needed to support all of the different scripts. There's far more to this than could be covered here. The short answer is, It depends, but it can be very simple for a developer; and definitely for an end user, there's nothing to it.

    Now, the other issue you might have been asking about was whether developers have to write extra code to get their UI to display in different languages. They certainly need to get the strings for their UI translated—there's no way Windows can do that for them. But apart from that, we've added new infrastructure in Windows 8 that makes this really easy for Metro style app developers. Metro style apps will automatically respond to the user's language preferences as configured in the Language control panel without the developer needing to write any code at all. (This assumes, of course, that the app has been translated into one of the languages in the user's profile.) Again, this is a developer-centric topic and there's more to it than can be covered here. If you want to learn more, you can find info in the Dev Center, including recorded sessions on this topic from the //BUILD conference.

  114. @R Huss—"For enterprises will the display language features be free or seperately licensed?" It is already the case in Windows 7 and Vista that Enterprise licenses include support for installing multiple language packs and switching of the Windows UI display language. This will continue to be true in Windows 8.

  115. @xpclient—"I have a suggestion for helping users find and filter all the relevant fonts by their language of choice…"

    Note that there were features of this nature added in Windows 7. If you go to the Fonts control panel and change to the Details view, you will see a column for a “Designed for” property. This is indicating what script each of the fonts on the system is designed for. You’ll also see a column labelled “Show/hide”: Windows 7 and Windows 8 detect what languages you have enabled for editing (on Windows 8, the languages you add to your profile in the Language control panel). Then, using the “designed for” information, Windows will automatically set a font to be "shown" or "hidden". The idea is that fonts are then filtered in font picker UI.

    The unfortunate limitation is that not all applications are able to make use of this. You will see automatic filtering of fonts, based on your enabled keyboard languages, anywhere that the ChooseFont common dialog is used (e.g., Notepad), or anywhere that the Windows Ribbon controls are used (e.g., Wordpad).

  116. @WindowsVista567: Glad you noticed! We thought this topic would be a good fit for UNESCO's International Mother Language Day.

  117. ooXx says:

    could MS AppLocale built-in Windows 8 (and show it in right-click content menu / or show some control-items in file property panel)? it is a good way to better support non-Unicode programs/apps………….

  118. ooXx says:

    why i have to restart PC after setting Language for non-Unicode programs……could Windows 8 change the old flow?

  119. ooXx says:

    why i have to restart PC after setting Language for non-Unicode programs……could Windows 8 change the old flow?

  120. @ooXx

    The "language for non-Unicode programs" setting is another name for "system locale", which is a very legacy setting in Windows. It requires a restart because it is a machine-wide setting. There are potential ways that the experience for non-Unicode programs could be streamlined. However, Unicode has been the recommended character set encoding since Win32 was first introduced over 15 years ago, and non-Unicode programs are becoming rarer. There are many other things we have chosen to work on because that way we can provide a lot more benefit to a lot more users.

  121. As others have said, is there really any need for that seperate Options page on the Languages section? Getting rid of that Options page would make it even easier. Most of that page is empty already, it's a waste of space and a unneeded step.

    Instead of the 'Options' button, just have the 'Download and install language pack' button in it's place, then once clicked it shows a progress bar in the same area. Then after download is complete the buttons 'Make this the primary language' and 'Uninstall display language' can both appear, again in the same area. Simple! No need for extra page.

  122. @Mayur Prayag ( India ) : Have you ever used IE9?

  123. Saeed says:

    Please support Persian language ، It's cute language

  124. @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    Thanks for that tip. The Fonts folder is certainly very useful in Windows 7 with all those extra metadata columns. If MS can improve the "Choose Font" dialog to incorporate those properties and let the user pick the font by that metadata criteria instead of automatically filtering, it would be awesome. Like "Show all fonts designed for ___ script" (Hint: Also look at OS X's dialogs). The Fonts folder could also do with indicating how complete a font's Unicode character set is. Why not add Character Map-like searching ability inside the Choose Font dialog?

  125. Kenneth says:

    The thing that bothered me abut installing MUI packs in Vista and windows 7 was the performance hit. when I had 2 or three languages installed, the machine started and ran slower. once they were removed, the machine ran fine. Is this an issue in windows 8?

  126. Stefano says:

    @Peter Constable

    "…focusing on making additional display languages available to ALL Windows users".

    Please tell us how many Windows 8 editions will be there. This phrase means that in EVERY edition users could change their language settings. Or at least tell us that not only in the Ultimate and Enterprise editions of Windows 8 this will be possible to do.

    (Always hoping in a reduction of Editions, or SKU's).

  127. ooXx says:

    @Peter

    I agree that you said "However, Unicode has been the recommended character set encoding since Win32 was first introduced over 15 years ago". I know it should be that, but sometime it is not that we think. Just like IE6… IE6 should be gone, but on somewhere some people must using it on their work…..it's sad……

    so "and non-Unicode programs are becoming rarer" I really hope it coming true!

    Thanks for reply, you are doing a good job! I can't wait to try Windows 8!

  128. ooXx says:

    @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    I agree that you said "However, Unicode has been the recommended character set encoding since Win32 was first introduced over 15 years ago". I know it should be that, but sometime it is not that we think. Just like IE6… IE6 should be gone, but on somewhere some people must using it on their work…..it's sad……

    so "and non-Unicode programs are becoming rarer" I really hope it coming true!

    Thanks for reply, you are doing a good job! I can't wait to try Windows 8!

  129. Nicholas Davidson says:

    Thank you, for finally recognising UK English. Even if it is somewhat belated

    It's not like the language originated here or anything…

  130. Please add Burmese – the official language of Burma – script display and language support

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Burmese_language

  131. Atul Gupta says:

    The challenge isn't really the mutliple languages.. the reason i think people stick with the initial default language has also to do with keyboard. I would like to say use Windows in my mother tongue, hindi, but the keyboard layout typically is still English and that experience needs updates.

  132. Judith Ormelliada says:

    Suggestion: Able to pin multiple folders to Windows Explorer at the same time

    Can I able to pin multiple files or folders at the same time to the taskbar?

    For example.. I have Windows Explorer pinned on my taskbar.

    I will drag 2 folders to Windows Explorer and pin it to Windows Explorer but Windows Explorer won't allow me.

    Now.. Can it be possible to pin multiple items at the same time to the taskbar? If no, can you add it as a feature to Windows 8?  Thank You and hoping you are reading every comment.

  133. Judith Ormelliada says:

    Suggestion: Please add Tagalog/Filipino Language.

    Filipino is the official language of the Philippines. Can you please add it? Language Support for Tagalog

    Here is the link for more information about Tagalog Language.

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Tagalog_language

    Thank you.. Hope you will listen

  134. domenicoav says:

    Off  Topic .

    PLS remove all compatibility with Bootcamp. i want W8 only for Strongest man

  135. @Steven Sinofsky

    you should use a custom extension and MIME on the language packs, so that they can simply be double clicked to be installed.

  136. @theyarecomingforyou

    Thats funny, I HATE seeing stupid ass British peoples English, they don't know how to talk or spell.

  137. @Max

    Because each language pack is 400mbs, can you image how big Windows would be if each language was installed by default!?!?!? it'd take up a DL Blu-ray o.O

  138. Please set:

    Microsoft YaHei as the default font for Simplified Chinese characters

    Microsoft JhengHei as the default font for Traditional Chinese characters

    Meiryo as the default font for Japanese characters

    and Malgun Gothic as the default font for Korean characters

    in Internet Explorer.

    So East Asian fonts can be anti-alised / take advantage of ClearType+Direct2D rendering, and look better.

    Instead of using bitmap fonts (MingLiu, BatangChe,…) as default.

    This can be manually changed via Fonts dialog in Internet Options

    http://www.ookii.org/…/ie_fontsdialog.png

    But make this default, so everyone can have fonts look better without have to edit.

    Read this article for example:

    http://www.ookii.org/showpost.aspx

    "Improving Japanese fonts in Internet Explorer and Firefox on Vista"

  139. Harry says:

    Hey can you guys tell me about whether windows 8 will be released before May or else i'm thinking of buying a laptop with windows 7…..i am a big fan of microsoft , so please don't disappoint me by releasing it very late..it would be cool if you release it by May

  140. The install disc would take a double layer blu-ray***

  141. Gautam Singh says:

    I also vote to xpclient for having transliteration as first option for indic and complex script language which works best in transliteration. this way I can use my familiar keyboard layout (means qwerty) to input in my language.  i do not have to learn and make use of stickers  my keyboard to input in my own preferred language

  142. Spiderman says:

    @Harry

    It's impossible. I guess it will be released in the October/December timeframe, in time for the holidays.

    @Dovella

    Buy a Mac and see, then install Windows 8 on it. Or shut up.

  143. @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    The blog entry mentions that the languages are available for all and you mentioned (response to R. Huss) that the all languages are available only for the enterprise version? So what is correct now?

  144. ReMark says:

    Yeah, a bit off-topic (I'm waiting a "general windows ui blog post") but a default tabbed Windows Explorer adds a great value to Windows. Increases productivity. Dear MS find a (beautiful and smart) way to add tabs on WExplorer (and a general option to set what default path show launching it, Libraries as default is annying).   Everyone I know wants tabs, there are many 3rd softwares that add this feature, but a default tabbed WE means a more mature OS.

  145. @Peter Constable

    You wrote "Spell checking is tied to the input language. So, for instance, if you enable a German keyboard (by adding it to your list of languages in the Language control panel), then select that keyboard from the input switching UI…, then whatever you type will get German spell checking applied to it.

    I hope that this was not entirely accurate, and that (a) the spell checking language remains independent of the keyboard layout, and (b) it will still be possible to select a keyboard layout different from the input language as is the case in current OSs. Would you please clarify?

  146. MUI User says:

    @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    Without telling users which edition(s)of Windows 8 have MUIs,this blog post is making things worst than good.

  147. GregH says:

    One version of Windows would be the best things for you to do now from a marketing and business perspective – then sell the Bit locker or other professional tools as add ons separately, out of view of the consumer – simple.

  148. Marcelo says:

    No windows7 só tinha como fazer downloads de novos idiomas para quem tinha a versão Ultimate.

    No "windows8" o download de idiomas poderá ser realizado em qualquer versão do windows? Grato e parabéns pelo trabalho.

  149. Ambious says:

    The biggest question – will this still require Windows Ultimate or will you finally allow home customers to choose their own OS's language?

    Up until now we've had to rely on OEMs to supply us a choice (doesn't always happen) or use semi-illegal and untrustworthy tools like Vistalizator.

  150. @Steven

    It's not clear to me.

    I.e.: will Spanish, German, Italian languages etc be included by default when Windows 8 is installed?

    It means that those languages comes included in Windows 8 setup?

  151. Microsoft is not clear says:

    @Ludomatico

    No, if you are in France it will come with only french, in Germany german, Italy italian, Spain spanish, etc…

    @Microsoft

    The question is: Will ANY version of Windows 8 give me the possibility to select the language I want?

    Why don't you answer?

  152. Nicos says:

    @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    What about the alt+shift bug I reported above, where by alt+shift does not switch among multiple keyboards assigned to a specific installed language, but it only switches among installed languages? In other words, if a language has more than one keyboard assigned to it, alt+shift can only switch to and from one of these keyboards, but it skips the other ones.

  153. @Nicos

    It's not a bug. Alt-Left shift is the /default/ KBSC for changing input languages using the preferred keyboard for the language cocerned, but you can configure other KBSCs for any input language/keyboard layout combination. On my machine, Alt-Shift-1 gives me Icelandic input on an Icelandic keyboard, while Alt-Shift-3 gives me Icelandic input on a US-International keyboard.

  154. PBJake says:

    Kind of irrelavent, but I'd love to see Windows lose all the "blueness" that's there in the aero theme, buttons, sidebars, etc. It's been there since the XP-era. Better yet, lose the aero interface all together. It's time for a change.

  155. PBJake says:

    @Mayur Dude, this is not the right page

  156. Stefan says:

    No need to get Windows 8. Microsoft kill Windows Vista and 7 at the earliest 2017.

  157. Stefan says:

    It is a big joke that only Ultimate have been allowed to use lang packs via Windows Update. Why can't all verions have it. I mean even if Microsoft doesn't want their users to install lang pack on other verion it is easy done with tools from the internet. It is such a stupid behaviour by Microsoft.

  158. Quppa says:

    @Nicos:

    You can use Ctrl+Shift to cycle through a language's keyboard layouts (or configure the shortcut to your liking – see the 'Advanced Key Settings' tab in Text Services and Input Languages in Windows 7 or earlier).

  159. @TuaneseOfficial—"Please add Burmese – the official language of Burma – script display and language support."

    Burmese text display is already enabled in the Windows Developer Preview build. (There are known bugs in that build that have already been fixed, so no need to report those; wait for the Consumer Preview.) We do not have a Burmese language pack planned for this release, however.

  160. @Judith Ormelliada—"Suggestion: Please add Tagalog/Filipino Language."

    Windows 7 already has support for Filipino as a Windows UI display language. See windows.microsoft.com/…/languages for details. Filipino will continue to be supported with a language pack in Windows 8.

  161. @heissm: I think you misread my response to R Huss.

  162. @.Firedog:

    It's important to understand that there's a distinction between a keyboard language and a keyboard layout. In Windows, these two things are combined in a pair, and the two elements of that pair can be combined in different ways.

    If you want German spell checking, then you must have content that's tagged as being in German, and for text you enter, than happens by setting German as the keyboard language. Now, you enable German as a keyboard language by adding it to your profile in the Language control panel, and a particular keyboard layout will be associated with that by default. But you can go and add other layouts or change the layout to something else—this is done in the language-specific Options page.

    So, suppose someone lives in the US and speaks English and German. The default keyboard layout for German is a QWERTZ layout; but that person could change their settings so that a QWERTY layout (e.g., the US – International layout) is used for both English and German.

    The basic functionality here is no different than in previous versions; we have just changed the UI.

  163. @LudoMatico—"will Spanish, German, Italian languages etc be included… in Windows 8 setup?"

    If you purchase retail media (e.g., boxed product you buy at a local computer shop), expect that to have only one language pack. Other language packs can be installed later.

    If you buy a new PC, the OEM can decide to include multiple language packs in the system image they provide, in which case you'd be allowed to choose between them during setup. (This was already the case in Windows 7 and Vista.)

  164. @BumbleBritches57

    Does "they don't know how to talk or spell." include not knowing how to spell "That's"

  165. Alex says:

    It's called Catalan, not Valencian. Please, fix this.

  166. Bob says:

    Hey Microsoft, can you add the ability to hook up xaml or html5 to Microsoft/Google's translator server so all the text in a UI can be automatically translated as a last measure.

  167. One Uyghur from Urumchi says:

    Special thanks to Microsoft Windows 8 will support Uyghur (PRC) LIP,

  168. Brent says:

    While remaining mostly useless, it would be rather cool if Windows supported Latin.

  169. @Peter Constable [MSFT]

    In Vietnamese, we need to have utilities to help typing the characters with the accent mark combinations. This job is done smoothly using physical keyboard. HOWEVER,

    Let say that I use Windows 8 tablet (without keyboard) Will the virtual keyboard in Windows 8 support typing all Vietnamese characters including accent marks? For example: when I press and hold "E" key they will show set of combination to choose for that letter such as "Ê, È, É, Ế, Ề, Ể, Ễ, Ệ"

    Thank you!!!!!

  170. Nicos says:

    @Peter Constable (MSFT)

    Using alt+shift for switching languages whilst using ctrl+shift for switching keyboards is too confusing to my mind. That's why I never knew about this feature.

    Anyway, the dialog for changing these hotkeys is also messed up in Windows 7:

    Go to Control Panel > Region and Language > Text Services and Input Languages > Advanced Key Settings tab

    Under Key Sequence list box, it has "Between Input Languages" as the first item and then it lists one by one "To <your languages>" … There is nothing to signify that changing the hotkey for "Between Input Languages" also includes a "Between Keyboards", hotkey setting when you press the "Change Key Sequence" button. That's why I never found out about this feature.

    Also, the "Change Key Sequence" dialog is messed up: When you open it focus goes on the OK button instead of the first item of the dialog and more importantly, when you tab around it the key assignments are reset to nothing. Tabbing around a dialog should not change anything in it.

    Please fix these.

  171. BumbleBritches57 I think the British know how to talk and spell using their OWN language. You know, the language they invented and what you're using right now because of them. Theres correct English, and theres incorrect English (american).

  172. @ Beany3001

    The British did not invent the English language, it is a mixture of several other languages that have been added together over centuries.

    en.wikipedia.org/…/History_of_the_English_language

    I think both the British and Americans would agree that the word "There's" not "Theres" is the correct abbreviation for "There is".

  173. KHan Aaqib says:

    WOOOOOWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

  174. LOL, just like they knew how to use medieval English, is that still in use or is it extinct? That's what I thought .

    and grammar nazism bruh? that's SO below you tho ^_^

  175. Judith Ormelliada says:

    '' @Judith Ormelliada—"Suggestion: Please add Tagalog/Filipino Language."

    Windows 7 already has support for Filipino as a Windows UI display language. See windows.microsoft.com/…/languages for details. Filipino will continue to be supported with a language pack in Windows 8""

    Thanks for the info @ Peter Constable (MSFT)

  176. Guybrush Ulysses Threepwood says:

    Price? SKU's? One single version for ARM, which version?… and… what's the meaning of the "crossword" kind of puzzle with some letters that appeared some time ago on the web?

    http://www.betaarchive.com/…/1301325730.or.32114.jpg

    Too many mysteries…… I don't like this….

  177. Hello There. I wish to say something about the accessibility features, but unfortunately the comments were closed on the relevant page. Anyway, there is one thing that I have always found annoying with narrator, and that is its inability to actually get it to read targeted text. For example, only read the text that you currently highlighted. The kind of program that I use currently to read to me is called speakonia, and it has this useful feature where it will read any text which has been copied to the clipboard. Unfortunately the program has ceased development, and the developers dropped it as a project. I hate for this comment to sound like a "Please add X feature from X program" request. But for people who have reading difficulties, They do not need the entire content of a program read to them such as " A is unchecked, C is unchecked, B is unchecked" etc. And it just becomes a spam of audio. The ability to just select text and have narrator only read what is selected, rather than everything onscreen, would be an invaluable feature for many. even if you do take a simplistic approach of just getting narrator to listen to the clipboard for text to read.

  178. Alvaro says:

    Just go to: Control Panel> Clock, Languaje, and Region > Language > Language options > "Download and install the display language"

    "It’s as simple as that. Pretty cool, huh?"

    -It could be simplier!!!!!!!!!…. you could trim some of the steps and screens in the process ..at least the 'Language Options' page it's pointless. You could simply change the 'options' link to "♣ Download and install the display language"

    You could let people submit their own LIP's to the windows store… Iike "Pirate Talk", "Klingon", all the languajes of the LOTR…. im sure that a bunch of developers and fan would be more than willing to work on this..

    Alvaro

  179. Alvaro says:

    Oh i forgot … ¿can we download a LIP for redistribution, like *.msi or *.msu??

    If we own more than one PC (or devices), this would be better than loading the same package(s) in every PC ….

    Alvaro =|

  180. Barcaz says:

    It would be useful if we can change the languages in all Windows 8 versions, because having it only in the Ultimate will can't be useful for tablets that need to be cheap…..also adding a translator in native way in Windows would be also useful for who use tablet/pc to navite (just think to Google Translator, but we need a way to get it more accurate and faster, without copy and paste), but it can also need for who wants to use for example the English as first language but needs some help in some words, where he needs a translator……but this is an idea the important is that the Windows staff is doing a really good job :D……but don't forget that Windows is also used from the gamer, so add as more driver as possible (for example, this is VERY IMPORTANT for me: can you add a drivers for the PS3 sixasis?it is a very good controller and it would be fantastic if we could use it via usb/bluetooth or wireless I don't know), and add a lot more bluetooth functions, and organizations of that devices…..

  181. I would like to know, how complex may be voice commands (like siri).

    And can the speech recognition handle accents (also in other languages than english)?

  182. Thank you in advance for Belarusian LIP!

  183. Several people have asked if installing a language pack couldn't be simpler, and whether an options page is needed at all. Let me comment on those things:

    There will be more to the options page than simply having UI to install a language pack, and having an options page provides a way to keep settings organized and easy to find without adding clutter to the main page.

    As for installing language packs, we agree that it's not difficult to imagine an easier flow, but there are some constraints we have to live with. Because these are system components, they need to be installed by a user with administrator privileges, and so we are required to show the UAC shield. We want it to be easy, and will continue to look for ways to make it easier.

    For now, I hope you'll agree that the overall experience is much easier than it was in Windows 7. If nothing else, people will be much more likely to discover when relevant language packs are available to them. As we've see in comments here, people have asked for Windows UI to be translated for their language not knowing that this has already been done in Windows 7.

  184. @Serge Nikalaichyk—"Thank you in advance for Belarusian LIP!"

    You're welcome! We hope you'll let all your Belarusian friends and family know. ☺

  185. <sarcasm>

    Wow, what a huge improvement!

    </sarcasm>

    "It’s as simple as that. Pretty cool, huh?" – It was soo difficult to download it from Windows Update website.

  186. Stefano says:

    "I hope you'll agree that the overall experience is much easier than it was in Windows 7". I can't tell, I'm using the Home Edition 😛 We still don't know if language selection will be possible for all editions of Windows 8…

  187. J says:

    Still no Klingon language? You guys suck.

  188. Georgina Clintwood says:

    February 29:

    1) Windows 8 Consumer Preview

    2) Visual Studio 11 Beta

    3) .NET Framework 4.5 Beta

    4) Microsoft Flight (final)

  189. A pretty useless, but very very fun feature would be as mentioned by others, allowing others to submit language packs, Klingon and some of the more "popular" LOTR languages would probably be added =)

  190. A little bit out of context, but shouldn't this Windows Update dialog be redesigned to match the rest of Windows? (Grey background all over the dialog, strange box border, …)

    blogs.msdn.com/…/1070.Installing_2D00_a_2D00_language_2D00_pack_5F00_6FF76E2E.jpg

  191. Carlo Rossi says:

    I suggest the use of a "Windows Store Card" like the iTunes Cards. It would be better not to use a credit card linked to a bank account, in order to buy software from the Windows Store. They are scratch cards with a numeric code, you just insert that code and your credit goes up for the amount selected. For example 15, 25, 50 or 100 $ or € or £.

    You can spend it whenever you want.

    I prefer using those cards, every big electronics shop or store sells them, as well as the physical Apple Stores.

  192. raymond says:

    The scroll bars are horrible in windows 8 and in the metro. This might seem minor but the aesthetics are indeed important. That scroll bar needs to be fixed. Someone needs to redo that. I just saw the sky-drive video. The scroll bars are not up to par design-wise. Also everything is flat. I hope this changes, having complete flatness is horrible. It's all boxes hope the metro and windows 8 end up being better graphically. Aero was okay but too glossy/glassy. Good to tone it down but not that much. The school bar looks more ugly than the windows xp one and that one is pretty horrible. Also what is up with the windows top area(the part with the exit, minimize, maximize button section ) that blue and the text is pretty bad. Also there needs to be better indication in the superbar. Sometimes when you highlight over a program you don't even know you are hovering over it, until you click it. Visually windows 8/metro needs some work. Also i hope you can see raw images from dslr, other image file types without having to download windows photo gallery. It  just doesn't make sense from a user-friendly perspective that you have to download extra programs to view those images when it can be built into the system to be viewed. Not everyone will be thinking that they need to download such programs to view different image file types. I mean apple has the ability on their OS X so please give us this. Maybe something should be down with the superbar as well visually it's boring. I like part of the zune program(not the superflatness of it) but the overall design of it. You should give your programs in the desktop mode a full screen ability like in the zune program and also easier ways of moving around the desktop and the programs. Also the visual design of the windows needs work. The buttons are overly glossy and just not visually appealing the design of the windows seem dated. Anyway I hope you the best and I hope you guys make the visual design of windows 8 and metro better. Thanks

  193. Sergey Z. says:

    Can non-unicode programs has per-aplication settings for locale (Properties->Application compatibility->Non-unicode locale). AppLocale allow run programs with own locale.

  194. á says:

    Valencian is an alternative name for Catalan. Please do not use two separate language packages for this. Please, see some authoritative source such as Ethnologue http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp

  195. Xero says:

    A little off topic but can you guys provide the brightness feature like Mac where user can dim the brightness till the screen is all black? Also, rather than having the fixed values (+20% jump), please make the dimness/brightness scale continuous to give the user a smoother experience.

  196. Dave says:

    Valencian new translation? Has already a lexiconization in Windows XP and 7 named Catalan-Valencian-Balear:

    Dialects: Catalan-Rousillonese (Northern Catalán), Valencian (Valenciano, Valencià), Balearic (Balear, Insular Catalan, Mallorqui, Menorqui, Eivissenc), Central Catalan, Algherese, Northwestern Catalan (Pallarese, Ribagorçan, Lleidatà, Aiguavivan).

  197. Antoni says:

    It's called Catalan, not Valencian. Please, fix this. Thanks

  198. Scoop on SKU's says:

    1) Windows 8 (32 & 64-bit)

    2) Windows 8 Professional (32 & 64-bit)

    3) Windows 8 Enterprise (32 & 64-bit, same as Professional but purchasable only with volume licenses for enterprises)

    Finally! Less versions, I hope this scoop will prove true.

  199. Raül says:

    Valencian is just the name that catalan language has in the Valencian Country. Please fix that as it may confuse the people.

    Is like quebecois not being French or Brazilian not being Portuguese… or mexican not being Spanish!

    Please arrange it… one language, one language pack!

  200. Viva Napuleeeee says:

    So, I want NEAPOLITAN in Windows 8.

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Neapolitan_language

    Jammo jà! Simmo 'e Napule paisà! Olé!

  201. Bop says:

    Valencian isn't a language! It's a dialect of Catalan language!

  202. mr nobody says:

    i hobs to supported Arabic more  

    i love Arabic language

  203. Wack0 says:

    yay, seperate en-GB language at last 🙂

  204. @Raül @Bop There already is standard Catalan in Windows 7. They are *adding* the Valencian dialect in the same way they are adding UK English. Given that it costs money to do these things there is obviously a demand

  205. David says:

    +1 on wanting native Colemak support.

  206. B8Blog says:

    @Robert Potter — You are exactly right on Catalan and Valencian.

  207. Pau says:

    Hi,

    In free software projects we use the name Catalan (Valencian) for Valencian transtations (LibreOffice, GNOME, KDE, VirtualBox and many others). You should consider changing the name in order to not differenciate between two variants of the same language.

    Thanks!

  208. Mark says:

    Can you make keyboard selection more easier for Canadians? I speak English only, like the majority of Canadians, yet everytime I install Windows, the language bar has US, Canada, and Canada Multilingual… I can't count the number of times I have accidentally switched to the french keyboard from some bizarre keyboard combination. Fortunately, I know how to remove the keyboards.

    However, for the less advanced users up here, I know many of them ask me why they can't type an appostrophe or question mark anymore, because it's so hidden and out of sight. Please fix this. There should be a prompt when you install Windows for the first time so that you can select which keyboards you want to be using.

    And for computers that are OEM and already have keyboards predefined on first run, it should not ever have the keyboard shortcut (Is it Ctrl + Alt?) for switching languages enabled by default. This is one of the most frustrating things in Windows, since forever.

  209. @Steven Sinofsky I just read your PDF about touchscreen, and just because lefties are only 15% of the population, dosen't mean that you shouldn't think about them. you should include a toggle to switch from left handed to right handed, with right being default as it's most common, and buildin this screen flip ability into an API, that way ALL Metro apps have this ability right outta the gate.

  210. Bradavon says:

    And yet anyone who uses an English language version of Windows has to put up with Internet Explorer spelling favourites the American way ;-).

    Scottish ha ha. I'm surprised you got that many requests.

  211. @Bradavon if you look at some of those languages being added, you'll notice a lot of them are languages/dialects with strong revivalist movements (Like Scots Gaelic). That means schools. School mean computer labs. Computer labs mean bulk OS licenses. I think MS knows what it's doing here 😛

  212. Carlos says:

    Please, can Windows 8 come with native "BR-Nativo" keyboard layout support? It's like Dvorak, but for brazilian portuguese language. Linux already supports it natively, while Windows needed a driver. The official home page is off-line, so the Windows driver isn't available anymore. If Windows 8 come with native support for this keyboard layout, I can upgrade to it without needing to change my keyboard.

  213. Welat says:

    Thanks for effort and supporting Kurdish language.

  214. @Steven Sinofsky

    Hi, I know this is a little off-topic but I saw this great example of some MS products "Metro-fied" and wanted to share the link with you.

    http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

    I think it would be great if the desktop could get some metro love as well. Also can't W8 for Win8.

  215. @LLP707

    I don't think that's a good idea. There's a difference between applying Metro-style design to something in order to improve it and applying Metro-style design to something because it can be done. I think Aero is a better design than Metro – much more modern and fluid.

  216. @WindowsVista567

    Well I think Aero just takes up space that could be better used elsewhere. Look at browsers they keep getting slimmer. People want content not chrome. Also there is no reason you couldn't make it a theme and switch back to Aero, like some switch back to Classic. Overall though there are dozens of people that heavily disagree with you. Just look at the comments on the page.

    "I think Aero is a better design than Metro – much more modern and fluid."

    I think Metro is a better design – much more modern, fluid, and puts content first.

    "There's a difference between applying Metro-style design to something in order to improve it and applying Metro-style design to something because it can be done"

    So by your logic then we should still be using the Classic UI Theme.

  217. Anss says:

    Valencian is just a catalan dialect, Microsoft fail!

  218. metroluver says:

    I know this is not right place for this comment but want to ask why not windows explorer have omnibar(the one like in ie9 for search and address bar combined)

    I think that would really give minimalist feel and when combined with some metro theme it would be great…

    And one more thing despite of all ur efforts for making "desktop part of metro" (I am big fan of metro UI)….

    The desktop still feels isolated from the WRT( metro style)…..I mean the UI needs some major touchwork for looking like metro style……..I mean less and less aero and more and more metro……….

  219. Anon says:

    This guy has a great take on Metro on Desktop, http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

  220. ooXx says:

    does Windows 8 supported zip with Unicode-filename?

    thx!

  221. metroluver says:

    @anon

    I think this is more better if some improvements are made on this…..atleast some of the elements in this are very nice…….

    browse.deviantart.com

  222. @Steven Sinofsky

    I love the Office 15 ribbon style…Metro, clean, touch centric, and less clutter.

    I hate Windows Explorer's ribbon, it's outdated in look even when compared to Office 2010's one.

    I don't know the reason why Windows Team is always one step behind the Office team in implementing the new style. First is falling to put the transparent ribbon like Office 2010 and now is this stuff. I hope 2 divisions work together to make the ribbon experience unified across Microsoft products in term of Microsoft's new design philosophy (Metro). I want Office 15's ribbon appears on Windows Explorer and other programs such as wordpad, paint…

  223. David says:

    @ Steven Sinofsky

    One thing I noticed that when I installed Windows 8 developer preview from Boot… There are many installation Windows in Aero style prompted to guide me through. One thing I notice that this Aero style used in these windows  is not the Windows 8's one. Still round edge, same min/max/close. I don't know whether or not Consumer Preview will have some updated on this.

  224. @nowuniverse

    Yeah I would love it if the Zune or Office team could design the desktop UI. The office UI is always top notch.

  225. markusdevine says:

    @Steven Sinofsky Look at this http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

    That is how the desktop should look in W8. Just look at the comments, everyone absolutely loves it! The switching at present between the Start Screen and Desktop is really jarring and people are screaming out for something like that. Look at the comments from Mac owners! They would ditch OSX for W8 if the desktop wasn't Aero anymore.

  226. @LLP707

    The statement "people want content, not chrome," isn't true for me. The default UI for Internet Explorer 9 may look like Google Chrome, but the first thing I did when I downloaded IE9 was to display the tabs on a separate row and turn on the menu bar, the Favorites bar, and the command bar.

    How is Metro fluid? Using Metro on a desktop PC, it has never, ever, been fluid. It gets in the way of everything.

    My logic is not against all UI redesigns. Visual appeal of the operating system is important, and Metro doesn't have any. I'm saying that it makes no sense to add Metro to the desktop simply because it is possible. As an option, Metro on the desktop is not a bad idea, but I don't think Microsoft should ever retire Aero.

  227. S.C. says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    Please have a look at this: http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

    This is what Windows 8 Desktop should look like!

  228. @WindowsVista567

    Well all the people posting think otherwise, including staff at the theverge.com. They just wrote an article about some of these concepts. I am not saying you can't access Aero though if you desire. It would be nice if it was a theme.

    "How is Metro fluid? Using Metro on a desktop PC, it has never, ever, been fluid. It gets in the way of everything."

    Metro isn't just the start screen. Metro is design guidelines. Metro is a style like Aero.

    "As an option, Metro on the desktop is not a bad idea, but I don't think Microsoft should ever retire Aero."

    Then we are in agreement because that is what I was proposing lol   : )

    Also @MS here is another design that you should take a look at: cdn0.sbnation.com/…/8b357c7cff026daa20807ea9e1130ed5-d4qw8bx.jpg

  229. Matthew Kol says:

    To further lend credence to what everyone else is saying, THIS: blog.gsmarena.com/this-is-what-windows-8-on-desktop-should-have-looked-like

    Please. I'm sorry. Everyone else is saying it, and this is what we want.

    I know you're way too far in the design process to go back, but please, if you could just do a do-over completely, this would make my life so much better.

  230. @Steven Sinofsky

    Why did my last two attempts at commenting result in a green "your comment has been posted" message, yet neither comment appeared (I should have posted one)?

  231. GregH says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    Can you not see the excitement and positivity that the wide community have for a new desktop UI – Metro is just a start screen – we appreciate the work you have done there, please do some work on the desktop UI!

  232. Matthew Kol says:

    I commented about changing the Metro UI about some concepts, but I realized that you guys have an amazing thing going. Just…pay attention to new ideas.

  233. Carles says:

    I'm Valencian, and Valencian is just a dialect of Catalan.!!!!!!!!

  234. NNCOLOMBIA says:

    First excuse my English, I know this is not the issue but I would like to see a desktop interface that impresses as the vision of Sputnik8 member of the official forums of The Verge. I'm no expert on these issues but I am studying to be one day but I saw and I liked this GUI is the link where I found the publication.

    http://www.genbeta.com/…/atencion-microsoft-un-concepto-de-la-interfaz-de-windows-que-deberias-estudiar

  235. @Steven & Team,

    Can you have a look at it? I just read one article on Win8. some feature requirement (see details)  are valid one from end user perspective.

    Article: http://www.digitaltrends.com/…/five-important-features-microsoft-must-add-to-windows-8

  236. Frustrated says:

    My frustration is incredible! why aren’t you just intelligent enough to actually do something like this:

    http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

    You’re so slow to catch on it is unbelievable – I thought Windows was the most important product in your business – you mean I have to spend the next 3 – 4 years hanging around with a very slightly improved Aero UI – not likely, I won’t be multitasking in Metro either, will I?!!??

  237. Solution says:

    I will make this very clear for you now, to balance the unrest about Metro, provide desktop professionals with some comfort that you actually care about desktop use and to increase sales and positivity of Windows 8 at release – you must:

    Dedicate a team of high end designers to create a new visual Style for Windows 8 release.

    Clear enough for you?

  238. Back to reality says:

    Out of the 35 teams there, who are the designers – Graphics Platform?

    And if you’re on one of the design teams, just to be perfectly honest – you haven’t done your job properly; you should be ashamed of yourselves.

    i39.tinypic.com/1zgvndw.png

    Why should a product like Windows fail just because of design, do you really want the community at large to accept Windows as inferior to competitors because you can’t take design seriously.

  239. Judith Ormelliada says:

    Suggestion: Easy Accessibility to Shut Down Options in start screen/ Guide how to shutdown in Windows 8.

    Hello!

    I have used Windows 8 Developer Preview and i find that new users of Windows 8 did not knew

    how to shut down/restart the OS (for desktop users). I just find out how to shut down when I have searched the internet.

    that the way to shutdown is Windows Key+I.

    Searching the way how to shut down is too complicated.

    Now, can you make a way for easy access for shut down options?

    My Suggestions:

    1.) If Windows Key+I is the way to shutdown the OS,

    can you please make a guide included with the Windows Package?

    Make a guide of how to access the shut down options included with the Windows Packaging.

    2.) If Windows Key+I is the way to shutdown the OS,

    Can you please include the Welcome Center application that has information on how to shutdown the OS.

    3.) Can you please make a shortcut in the start screen of shutdown options?

    Something that we can click.

    Example: There is a box or rectangle labeled Shut Down in the startscreen.

    When I click that Shutdown app, It will shutdown the OS or show me the shutdown options.( Less complicated, one click)

    Thanks and more power to Microsoft. Hoping that you will consider my suggestion.

    God Bless!

  240. Judith Ormelliada says:

    Suggestion: More supported codecs in Windows Media Player

    Hello!

    Can you please add more media file extension support for Windows Media Player?

    Just like .mkv .ogg .

    Thanks and more power to Microsoft. Hoping that you will consider my suggestion.

    God Bless!

  241. Stefano says:

    1) A "Shutdown TILE" in the Start Screen.

    2) A "GPS TILE" with maps already included, to use a tablet as a car navigator (I hope Windows 8 tablets will have GPS global positioning system functionality).

    3) At least another browser (Firefox) Metro version, already integrated by default. Do it for the European antitrust laws.

  242. The text says:

    "The release of English for the United Kingdom is also a trial run for us. Adding a second language under an already existing primary language code—ISO 3166-2 EN—poses some engineering challenges for us (which is why this took us so long to do). We have had to pay attention to the language fallback chain, for instance. If there are no localized resources available at any time, we fall back to secondary choices and then to English. That used to be English US. But, now there’s English UK as well. Which do we fall back to?"

    Prior to this, says:

    "We believe that this version of Windows [UK English] will also be widely used in India, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, the Republic of Ireland and many other places."

    In a roundabout way, isn't that answering your own question? The dialects of English that are just minor variations on UK English, will now fallback to UK English rather than US English. What am i missing?

    As i alluded to in my previous comment, something is not quite right with the very notion of English dialects like Australian English, which are slowly but surely evolving into US English, and away from traditional British spellings. For example, there is the British Labour Party, and the Australian Labor Party. So, what is the correct Australian English spelling of 'labor' – the current party of (minority) government in Australia and the Internationalization department at Microsoft do not agree on this. For me this begs the question, where are you getting spellings for the various dialects from, statistical analysis of common usage, or 'official' dictionaries? The problem with the later is their partly museum-like nature. I asked several people about the spelling 'gaol' versus 'jail', and all but one spelt it the the US way.

    Having thought about this some more, this is how i would like language configuration to work. Assume the user wants some dialect of English that is not US or UK English. The user nominates their default language. Windows then nominates either US or UK English as the fallback language, based on which of these English language versions is most appropriate. The user can choose to override this system choice. For example, i personally would make en-US my fallback language (from en-AU), rather than en-UK. The system-wide spell checker should then have two operational modes, user configurable. The default mode is normal/strict mode. The alternate mode is fallback-forgiving mode. In this mode, the spell-checker will accept *either* the current language spelling, *or* the fallback language spelling, as the correct spelling. So in the case of en-AU -> en-US + fallback-forgiving spell mode, 'defense', 'traveler', 'personalize' and 'theater' are all considered acceptable spellings. Perhaps programs like Word would use an alternate spell error signifier for these cases, like a yellow squiqly underline. Did i just invent spell warnings? 🙂

  243. Alxandr says:

    Don't know if you guys saw this; but if you ever want to truly reimagine windows design; this is (one of) the way to go: http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept

  244. Btw, in cultures that speak some variant of UK English, 'stores' are usually and traditionally referred to as 'shops'. 'Store' is synonymous for 'repository', not 'a retail outlet'. So in that sense the name 'Windows Store' is actually a localized name. Will buyers of the UK English version of Windows 8 buy their apps from the Windows Shop, rather than the Windows Store? Otherwise, will they get confused and think their Skydrive is contained within Windows Store? Will they also place apps in a shopping trolley, rather than a shopping cart?

    So there are US terms for important commercial concepts and entities, that are used globally. Do English speakers outside the United States care about this, or even notice? I don't think so, but trying telling one of these people they should quit spelling 'centre' the culturally correct way, and start spelling it the phonetically correct way, and you're likely to find yourself in an argument!

    A good watch – http://www.youtube.com/watch (The Adventure of English – English in America – Ep 5).

  245. @Peter Constable [MSFT] – "Note that the window for adding a language is resizable and can be maximized to fill your screen, if you'd like."

    Ok, but that's just one more window to manipulate because i find the defaults poor. I spend my life …

    • Maximising window's vertical dimension to minimize excessive scrolling

    • Scrolling or tabbing around in unresizable dialogs

    • Snapping windows left/right to minimize pointless window overlap

    • Dragging tree-view columns to the right, because the maximized window defaults in apps like Explorer and Regedit are ridiculously narrow

    • Manually correcting column widths that should auto-fit to content by default or at least by option, but don't – Explorer and Regedit again being the prime culprits

    • Making cmd window layouts larger than the 1980s 25 row by 80 column standard default

    • Missing fullscreen mode in all apps except IE, WMP & WMC

    … and i'm over it. I want this nonsense fixed and these limitations removed. It is very much an attitude of wanting to see the basics done right before getting excited by any fancy new stuff.

    The windowing functions introduced in Windows 7 are just brilliant. Lately i've been looking at and using inbox apps and Control Panel items in snapped left/right mode (where applicable). This windowing mode works well for many of these, and would often make better default window dimensions and positions than existing defaults. Control Panel should open snapped left (halfscreen width and maximized height). Control Panel items should open snapped right. This would make perfect sense, because it uses available screen space without concealing options from the user, and it creates a quasi-dual pane config. Compare this to an app like Wordpad, with default window size and position being about 1/3 of screen pixels, and approximately centered onscreen. What exactly is the point of this? Desktop apps with resizable parent windows should open maximized or snapped left/right, by default. In general, the side-by-side windowing configuration is very good in terms of using the screen efficiently, avoiding window overlap and enabling the end user to perform visual comparisons. Windows should be doing much more to exploit these benefits.

    Another windowing function i would like to see or at least try, is the idea of title bar click-through. If multiple windows are snapped left/right, clicking the title bar of the topmost left/right window (with focus) should move it down one position in the z-stack – revealing the next topmost window. Ditto for maximized windows. Title bars are obviously wider than Taskbar items, and have infinite size above their topmost edge, so their Fitts Law fit is superior to Taskbar items, and consequently should be available as an end user option for switching between windows.

    Re the Language and Add languages dialogs.

    • In spite of the use of tiles, 'English (United States)' has to wrapped – a jarring look

    • In the 'Hindi language has been added' screenshot, the United States keyboard layout is abreviated to US, but Hindu Traditional is not abreviated to HT. Why?

    • I don't understand the use of multiple columns for lists or search results (anywhere). Has any web search engine ever done SERPs with multiple colums? My brain can't handle more than 2 columns. Have you got usability data you could share or point to that shows people use multi-column lists faster then single-column? The 'Add languages' dialog should be in Content view, not Tile view.

    • "Once selected, the language is added to your language list, but does not download and install the display language until you choose to do so. To add it as a display language, click Options." That is going to confuse. 'Add a language' might be more accurate as 'Add to list' or 'Preinstall a language' and Options should appear as Install, until the user does that.

  246. @LLP707 and others linking to The Verge's mock-ups

    That picture that LLP707 linked to is much, much better than any of The Verge's mock-ups. It's still not perfect (and I still prefer Aero), but it looks like a better idea than any of the pictures from The Verge.

  247. Languages says:

    For me, you have to give the language files to the community, in the way that who want can translate (in a free way) in the dialects that he knows, then upload these files to Microsoft!!!!! for me this is a good idea because Windows can take a functionality thAT NO OTHER O.S. has…….also having the interface in their dialect, could be nice, and some easier for some people

  248. Languages says:

    For me, you have to give the language files to the community, in the way that who want can translate (in a free way) in the dialects that he knows, then upload these files to Microsoft!!!!! for me this is a good idea because Windows can take a functionality thAT NO OTHER O.S. has…….also having the interface in their dialect, could be nice, and some easier for some people

  249. Jordi says:

    Catalan and Valencian are exactly the same language, one that is named Catalan.

    You may check that site: http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp, just as an example. Surely you should ask Universities and not politicians, before feeding artificial divisions between languages.

  250. @MSFT Dev. Team

    Little off topic:

    Could you guys make it possible to move your home (User) dir. to a different drive sort of how Linux does when you setup your /home in a different partition? That way when Windows goes belly up my data is still safe? Do this through a GUI please! I think you can do it now but it kind of wonks stuff up so i just make a fake user folder on a different drive.

  251. WTF says:

    WTF

    Hey guys! I hate IE because is SLOW like a pig, but i LOVE OFFICE 2007 AND WINXP WHY?

    BECAUSE IS NOT FAST/ NOT STABLE BUT  

    CUSTOMIZABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!SO: as we see there is no progress to CHROME or Firefox!!!!!!!!!

    I need ONE Thing that i miss since WINDOWS VISTA it is:sorting headers in list view.

    iF anybody read this please comment.

  252. JGodo says:

    Post for people complaining about valenciano and catalan language:

    A ver pesados con el catalán y valenciano. También el inglés de UK y EEUU son el mismo idioma y van a incluir los dos. Vivid ya vuestra vida y dejad a los valencianos tranquilos. ¡Pesados! Por mi como si meten bable.

  253. WinUser says:

    Maybe that Language Center could be made for all MS prodcuts, so that office will linked there too and the oter ms apps

  254. Prayaas says:

    I know that's offtopic but a really good suggestion.

    PLEASE! Color the new Windows logo. Blue isn't so good. The logo's awesome but the 4 Windows colours (Red, Green, Blue & Yellow) would look best on it.

  255. @BumbleBritches57 Think MS should have some kind of age restriction to stop kids like you from commenting here. It's embarrassing reading your comments.

    @Boots112233 British did invent the English language. Obviously. It does not matter if it uses words from other languages, as many languages do this anyway. Most English words are spelt and pronounced different as well. Technically the British did invent English.

  256. Quppa says:

    @Drewfus: I think you're overstating the influence of American spellings on Australian English. The Australian Labor Party uses that spelling for historical reasons*, but in all other cases 'labour' is spelt with a 'u' – there's no confusion there. 'Gaol' is indeed old fashioned, but I think that the same is true in Britain.

    Words that appear frequently in Windows like 'centre', 'colour', 'personalise', 'customise', 'favourite', etc. are not controversial: most Australians use the British English spellings.

    * http://www.alp.org.au/…/labor-history

  257. Nitz Walsh says:

    "Don't know if you guys saw this; but if you ever want to truly reimagine windows design; this is (one of) the way to go: http://www.theverge.com/…/windows-desktop-ui-concept&quot;

    See, *that* is actually what I expected the Windows desktop to look like when I saw the Start Screen.  There's actually a flow from one environment to another.  

    But *so far* (qualifying that because of the beta), to "Metrofy" the Desktop, we get removal of rounder corners (make the window borders appear that much thicket, even though they aren't), and toning down of transparency, and the ribbon which now clashes with Metro design principles even more.  It's just bizarre.

  258. Countdown says:

    -2 days to Windows Consumer Preview. I hope there will be an announcement in here.

  259. KeepItConsistent! says:

    I forgot.. having localized language packs it's good but having localized keyboard shortcuts it very bad…. i roam a lot between machines in different languages with no problem (i don't need to even read the messages anymore) , but when i try to do something with keyboard shortcuts  too often i got mad because these don't work the same….  HOW ABOUT KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS IN LOCALIZED WINDOWS?????

  260. Carles says:

    I'm Valencian, and Valencian and Catalan are different languages.!!!!!!!!

  261. Keyboard shortcut says:

    Why is there a keyboard shortcut to change keyboard layout? And why is it so similar to the shortcut to insert an equation in MS Word? It is too easy to accidentally change the layout, before I had to restart word every half hour or so to get the keyboard layout back because I didn't know it was a shortcut that changed it. So frustrating.