Using Task Manager with 64+ logical processors


Ryan Haveson, a group program manager on the User Experience team, wanted to update folks on some progress with Task Manager since the Windows Developer Preview. In this post you’ll find the updated Task Manager tools for managing systems with a large number of logical processors. This is scalability well beyond desktop PCs, and is designed for the server and data center. A big part of Windows development is that the OS scales across a wide range of form factors and CPU architectures.

Note on comments.  Please keep comments up to community standards.  Just a reminder that there is no moderation of comments other than automated spam protection.  –Steven Sinofsky

We talked about the new Task Manager in a previous post, and many of you have installed the Developer Preview and seen it for yourself. There was some interest on this topic so we thought we would take a moment to quickly share with you a feature that just showed up in our daily builds that you will be able to see for yourself in the future, in the Beta release.

The pictures below relate to a feature that server admins and people with access to mega-PC setups with lots and lots of logical processors often ask us about. One key thing to note up front is that here we are talking about logical processors, so if you have a system capable of hyper-threading, you will see multiple logical processors for each physical processor.

For those of you who have access to one of these many-processor systems, you know that the task manager CPU charts in Windows 7 have a few limitations:

  • Lack of real-time comparisons: When you are looking at a CPU graph for lots and lots of logical processors, it is the anomalies that are interesting. At scale, it is pretty hard to compare moving line graphs of a 60-second window of CPU utilization to understand what is going on.
  • Tiny graphs: When you get to the 64+ logical processor range, the graphs get pretty small. If you are trying to figure out which processors are being heavily used, you really have to squint to figure it out. When you get over 256 logical processors, you can barely read the charts at all.
  • Finding the processor ID: If you do identify an anomalous graph, there is no easy way to get the corresponding processor ID.

Below is the Windows 7 Task Manager CPU performance tab on a system with 160 logical processors.

CPU Usage History table contains 160 tiny cells, each showing a moving line graph of usage.
Figure 1: Old Task Manager showing 160 logical processors

As you can see, it is really hard to compare the cells in the CPU Usage History table to each other. The graphs are hard to read, and if you want to compare instantaneous CPU utilization, it is nearly impossible because each cell is showing a moving 60-second graph. Moreover, all the graphs in the CPU Usage History table look identical, so you can’t easily find the processor ID for a specific graph. In our previous post on Task Manager, we discussed the benefits of using a heat map as a visualization to convey and compare large amounts of numerical data. When we looked at designing the graphs for the “many-core view” of the new performance dashboard, a heat map was a natural fit.

In the screen shots below, taken from a current build of Windows 8, it is now easy to see all the logical processors at a glance and know which are being utilized to high and low capacity.

(Note: The screen shots below show Task Manager on a system with 160 logical processors with a simulated workload.)

Performance tab has 7 views: CPU, Memory, Disk 0, Disk 4, Disk 8, Ethernet, and Ethernet. In CPU view, table of logical processors is in form of a heat map, with percent usage indicated in each cell with a number and corresponding color.
Figure 2: New Task Manager showing 160 logical processors

In the new CPU graph, you can also get the logical processor ID that maps to each entry via a tooltip, by hovering over the entry with the mouse.

Tooltip for an entry at 100% usage reads "CPU 0 (Node 5)"
Figure 3: Tooltip showing the logical processor ID

A major benefit of a heat map is that it scales really well to large data sets. The new Task Manager will show as many logical processors as the OS supports (up to 640!). To make sure you always see the information at a meaningful size, when the data set gets too big for the window, the heat map scales to best fit, and a scroll bar appears as needed.

Heat map is still easy to read, as it shows 13 rows and 9 columns of data, with a scrollbar that allows you to see additional cells below the first 13 rows
Figure 4: With 160 logical processors, the CPU graph scales using a scrollbar

For those of you who really like to (micro-) manage every last detail of your system, you can even set which logical processor(s) each of your processes can use. To do this, you first find the ID of the logical core by hovering over one of the cells in the heat map, then go to the Details tab, right-click the process you want, and click “Set affinity.”

User has right-clicked "iexplore.exe" on the Details tab of Task Manager, which reveals context menu with commands for: Open file location, End process, End process tree, Debug, UAC virtualization, Create dump file, Set priority, Set affinity (shown selected), Analyze wait chain, Search online, Properties, and Go to service(s).
Figure 5: Set process affinity from the Details tab

Dialog reads "Which processors are allowed to run "iexplore.exe"? There is a dropdown list for Processor group, set to "Group 0". Below this is a set of check boxes for CPU 0 (Node 0), CPU 1 (Node 0), CPU 2 (Node 0), etc., and OK/Cancel buttons.
Figure 6: Select the logical processors for the process

Of course, setting processor affinity is only for the super-technical user who has a need or desire for that level of control—you can severely affect your system’s power management and performance if you don’t know what you are doing—so we made sure the OS would do a great job taking care of this for you. It is hard to do better than the sophisticated algorithms that Windows uses to automatically manage which processes are allocated to each logical processor based on hardware capability and topology.

–Ryan Haveson

Comments (190)

  1. Kalpesh Chheda says:

    First

  2. Alberto Hatman says:

    Second… and wow… what a super computer

  3. GregH says:

    Third… we are cooking with gas now.

  4. that is just a great improvement, even if i cannot take advantage of it πŸ˜‰

    but in the future

  5. This is just a great improvement, even i f i cannot take advantage of it at the moment πŸ˜‰

    but in the future

  6. thartist says:

    Fine. How much longer revolving around the same topics? It's been all about metro and task manager, it's not so interesting anymore, show us something new Steven.

  7. Another says:

    160 cpus can it run BF3?

  8. tsonga 97 says:

    what pc overkill !!!!!!!!

  9. ACE says:

    Note that one can set affinity in windows 7 as well. Perhaps allow to set which core runs which "program" in addition to just processes?

  10. Thanks for the post. By the way, the blue window borders are really neat. Should this new desktop style be there to stay (instead of the aero style), this would be refreshing and surely more metro-like.

  11. ScaraX says:

    The most interesting thing in this post is the new window deesign πŸ™‚

    Is this going to be the new Aero look for Win8? I like this!

  12. Tristan says:

    Is this blue background based on current load, or average load over period of time ? Graphs allow you to look at past CPU load. Switching from app to task manager may take few seconds. Could be good, to add some graph as tooltip to core or to task

  13. will you giveaway that PC in a contest ? πŸ˜‰

  14. notyourmom says:

    1TB of RAM!?! Gigabyte per second disk IO!?! 160 cores!?! Where can I buy this beast!

  15. gmj says:

    Another great use of heat maps …

    Have you considered adding to the tool tip a moving line graph of a 60-second window of CPU utilization for that particular processor to provide additional understanding of what is going on?  I.e., in the Figure 3 heat map, you'd also know that CPU 0 Node 5 was at 100% for the entire time or momentarily peaked at 100%.

    Thanks

  16. fas says:

    # ScaraX

    It is the same as the basic theme in the Developer Preview. (I think).

  17. Miller says:

    I call it THE IMAC KILLER!

  18. @Microsoft says:

    Ok, first of all, I really love the heat map implementation.  Overall I think this feature is great, and much better than the the "old" (current) view in Task Manager for multiple processors.  Although it does bring up the question of the purpose of seeing each individual processor load?  When you start to get past a certain number of CPUs, isn't it easier to look at overall CPU usage or individual process CPU usage?  No fault of the design, but just curious as to who is looking for this information… and what exactly do you use it for?

    For example, if I am troubleshooting a problem and looking at resource utilization… I am more likely to pull up perfmon (or similar) and chart overall CPU, Memory, Network, and Disk usage as a stating point.  At the same time, I would take a look at processes and watch which is grabbing the most of any given resource.  At what point would you need to know that CPU 2 is spiking specfically?  As long as the other 159 CPUs are not maxing out, there isn't that much of an issue in most cases, no?

  19. Scott says:

    You've been able to set affinity since NT 4. I do like the heat map though.

  20. Euphoric says:

    How would this thing look with 4 processors? There is no need for heat map with 4 cores and there is more than enough free space for old graphs. Will there be difference in how this tab looks with few and lot of processors?

  21. r3loaded says:

    From my calculations, that server has a total of eight 10-core Xeon CPUs, with each core hyperthreaded for a total of 160 logical processors. An eight-socket motherboard, even in the high-end multi-socket server realm is pretty insane!

  22. Wouter says:

    While the tool tips are an improvement, I would really like to get a more instant overview of the physical groupings of the logical cores. I'm not sure how your "nodes" and "groups" translate in terms of cores, dies, sockets and higher level hierarchies, but it would be great if you could see your affinity and energy policies in effect, given how important those spacial properties become for performance and efficiency in massive multiprocessor setups.

    Speaking of that, I would love to be able to quickly disable n-1 cores of n-way multithreading processors (without going through the BIOS) and to disable all but one socket or core for power efficiency. All I've got to play with now is some meaningless percentage in the power plan.

  23. Skiz says:

    @@microsoft – actually, it is important to know specifically when a process has a single thread that is "stuck".  The symptom is easy to describe on a desktop PC.  If you had a single CPU box, you'd obviously be concerned with something always using 100% CPU.  Say you have a dual core PC.  You should absolutely be concerned if a single process is constantly consuming 50% CPU.  If you have a four core, you should be concerned if a single process is constantly consuming 25% CPU.  Yes, it becomes less and less noticeable to the overall system performance as cores increase, but it is still a big problem nevertheless.  Any process that exhbits this behavior for a long period of time can easily be in an unrecoverable state and may need to be restarted.

  24. Ankur Patel says:

    Awesome feature… I feel heat map representation is really helpful in troubleshooting scenarios as previously we had to do guess work with real percent values. Please make heat map representation as default across the OS wherever we are depciting system resource utilization.

  25. @@@Microsoft says:

    Yes… When a given process is stuck, and I can see that by looking at the processes.  When do I need to look at each core specifically?

  26. ordag says:

    Looks very nice. But in that category list i want to see "GPU" with information about it's memory (shared + own), speed, etc. πŸ˜€

  27. Hi,

    I think MSCONFIG should be improved too, like Autoruns from Sysinternals, It shoul have more features that help us to know what is going on with the system startup.

    Thanks!

  28. Robin Holt says:

    notyourmom, Not sure if anybody else is building these, but SGI has them.  At the size they are using, I think our largest config would be 4TB of RAM, but it might be 8TB.

    I really don't like the scroll bar idea.  Now you lose the ability to see the whole machine at once.  Before, you could see all the cpus at one time.  You could also group them by socket and have a more manageable graph to look at.  Is that option retained?

    One feature that would be helpful is being able to select a set of groups or cores and filter only the tasks running on the selected set.

  29. Gary says:

    So, is 160 processors the recommended spec for Windows 8, or can you get away with 64?  πŸ™‚

  30. mvadu says:

    Most of these new features are direct copy of Process Explorer. (you can set processor affinity in Win XP SP3 as well using ProcExp)  Again, why can't you merge ProcExp with Task manager instead of reinventing the wheel? For basic view show all new shiny Task manager, and for advanced just show Process Explorer.

  31. alewind says:

    Stefen has mentioned a really magic word: Beta.

    Things goes really well. Good job.

    A question please: Any comment about a hypothetic Windows 8 – Windows Phone Apollo convergence?

    Thank you.

  32. Ron says:

    1TB ought to be enough for everyone

  33. I like the heat map idea too, but I really think it would be nice to still have some way to access the historical information for each CPU, perhaps via tool-tip, or make the heat map historical and the percentage instantaneous. Finally, I think it is important that we be able to group processors. Especially since hyperthreaded cores will show up twice and in many instances their utilization will trend together even if a single thread is running on the core. I would love the option to turn off the view of hyperthreaded cores and just see the core as a whole. Otherwise the graph of utilization can be quite misleading.

    Also, the suggestion about being able to turn off cores and/or sockets from within Windows is a great idea for power management and for testing. Of course, such a feature would be enhanced if we could see processor utilization grouped together. Perhaps you should use an expandable or drillable heat map like many disk utilization programs use to show hard drive utilization (drive, folder, subfolder, files; socket, core, hyperthread).

  34. @ Dany Rodier

    If this would become the new desktop style, then it is one more reason for me not to upgrade to "FullScreen 8"

  35. nilsm says:

    love it πŸ™‚

  36. what will happen if i have for example 60 logical cores, will i have the classic view?

  37. GregH says:

    @Site-Jumper – this is not the new desktop style – it is the non-aero basic theme like Windows 7 has.

  38. One issue already raised before which I had hoped to see addressed here is how to display process-level CPU usage in a sane way in a multi-core setting. For instance, for my 4 cores/8 threads setup, a process will seemingly never occupy more than 13% of the CPU as long as it only runs in one thread. This is misleading and not very informative, especially for the above 100+ processor scenario, where it makes the data completely meaningless, with CPU load never moving above 1%(!).

    Please consider modifying the way CPU load for individual processes are calculated, or provide a way (tooltip, for instance), to see individual core utilization for that specific process.

    (Is that a new, more Metro-like desktop UI I glimpse in the above screenshots? πŸ™‚ )

  39. Edward says:

    But can this system play crysis?

  40. Martin says:

    Wow, looks really cool!

    I like how you can set the affinity, and how simple it actually is.

    And while it's simple, the advanced users have a lot of control over their machine!

    PS. Finally new design on those scroll-bars! Thanks Microsoft! πŸ˜€

  41. asdf says:

    1. can you use KiB instead of KB

    2. can you display numbers like "5120 KB" with a number locale that can insert commas in them like "5,120 KiB" instead?

  42. I would like there to be just a line repersenting total CPU usage system wide, with individual graphs below the universal line, witha  white background so it looks like theres no grid, just a free flowing line.

    [IMG]i39.tinypic.com/mc6kpy.png[/IMG]

    you will probably notice the green line (lazy photoshopping, i apolagize) it'd be nice if there was a universal total CPU usage graph, or a number indicating the total cpu usage there.

  43. Oh, yes, for ALL number measurments, such as RAM usage, you shouldn't stick to a specific measurment system such as kilobyes, megabytes, etc. you should atuomatically scale to understandable terms. if an app is using 1000 mb of ram, say that it's using 1GB. simplyfy it.

  44. DamionM says:

    In the CPU usage history window .. Can there be an option to show the CPU graphs that are in their own boxes in one chart with 64 series that are check-able. That would probably be more visually better? Similar to how Speedfan shows their charts.

    Also don't forget to allow set affinity through the icon/tile options/settings  if possible..

  45. wait. there IS a total CPU usage. sorry i just assumed there wasn't one.

    you should try to make the task amanger not be such a clusterfuck tho. no effecne, but there's ALOT of stuff going on.

  46. I like that task manager recognizes the difference between partitions and drives πŸ™‚ good job guys! Task Manager seems perfect. whodathunkit? πŸ˜‰

  47. Oh, you should also let me right-click multiple items and set ALL of their affinity, ADN remember the affinity after a reboot πŸ™‚

  48. francesco pira says:

    it's a really nice idea. good work. way to go

  49. Please use a Lion like scroll bar.

    don't force me to make Cloud8

  50. BTW, i know that y'all just LOVE blue, it's been your color for like, ever. but no one associted blue with heat. you should really use different shades of red.

  51. Alan Burchill says:

    Heat maps look hot… πŸ˜‰

  52. Alireza Noori says:

    These works are really awesome. I really enjoy reading these recent posts. Especially the task manager.

    On a side note, the new design looks great. I can see metro in the design and I really love it. I hope it is global (across all of the Windows components). And I pray (figuratively) that you guys have a dark version of this design for people like me who spend more than 10 hours a day in front of their PC.

  53. Windowsfan says:

    I realize that this is the "basic" theme, but the scroll bars and arrows are quite unattractive. I agree with BumbleBritches57: a Lion-like scroll bar, one that GETS OUT OF THE WAY WHEN YOU ARENT USING IT, is the way to go. On the other hand, I realize you need to differentiate OS from Lion, so i don't expect the scroll bar to look like it was lifted from Lion haha.  

  54. AndyP says:

    anyone else notice the ui change around the outer edges of the window

  55. James M. says:

    Speechless…. =O

  56. Billy says:

    I know this isn't the final design but damn that UI is horrible.

  57. RonV says:

    @notyourmom

    I think this is Steven's new home computer. :))

  58. Moderator says:

    @BumbleBritches57, hey cowboy easy easy, first compile all your talks into a single comment then post. don't make the comment space messy!

    @Billy, the UI is super new and pretty cool. your comment is horrible though!

  59. Rita says:

    @Microsoft, @BumbleBritches57, @Windowsfan

    I guess there should be a system wide scrollbar that is used in Metro IE. The one that gets out of the way when the cursor focus is out and it is slick and slim.

    You can see the example here:

    s3.amazonaws.com/…/399949900.png

  60. Joe before says:

    What windows needs is an awesome terminal and a simple notepad like iWriter App on iPad. They have to make this both elegant and simple to use. Simple principle: get out of the way . Let the user interact  in the simplest and the easiest way.

  61. Off topic and i apolagize for that, but please Microsoft include an ALAC codec with Windows 8

    Apple just open sourced it, and it's under an Apache license. at least look into it?

    http://alac.macosforge.org/

  62. I'm sorry moderator, i get hyper kind of often, and think i'm done, but then i think of something else. sorry

  63. @Joe before says:

    Wordpad is shipped since windows 98 i guess… iWriter has no advantage over wordpad. Notepad, OTOH, is for raw look at the text/data.

    OAN, those who mention about apple cloud. that's another thing Apple decided to copy from Microsoft (SkyDrive, Office365, Azure…), and pretend that they invented it. so before you think about defending apple, just remember apple is ALSO a thief.

  64. @@Joe Before

    Apple didn't copy Microsoft, Microsoft and Amazon RUN iCloud. lmfao. n00b

  65. tpi2007 says:

    This is useful to a point, but you should allow people to switch to a graph because that allows you to see the load history of the cores and not just the instantaneous value, which can be of little meaning in certain cases – for example, how do you determine if you are CPU bottlenecking in a game with a heat map after you Alt-Tab ?

    Also, from a usability standpoint, that is too much white! Make the background of the task manager a little grey so it's easier on the eyes, just like with the current task manager.

  66. No. don't do grey. grey looks stupid.

  67. No. don't do grey. grey looks stupid. just turn down the brightness of your monitor.

  68. tpi2007 says:

    BumbleBritches57:

    I have the brightness of my monitor down to the minimum, and yes I am using Windows Developer Preview on a system, so I know what I am talking about, that color scheme does not work, it's too much white. The current task manager has a better (although not perfect) color scheme. I'm not talking about putting in grey per si, just a shade of grey that cuts the extreme white that you can see in the Task Manager as it is right now in the Developer Preview, which is excessive.

    Besides, the best of both worlds, let the user decide, no ? It's not that hard to put that option in there.

  69. sreesiv says:

    Super, heat map rocks and can get information at a glance. Looks awesome.

  70. Alvaro says:

    stay on topic…. about the heat map… it's great but we loose historical data (histogram grafic) /—/_/v ..  you could make the % instant but keep the histograms.. just make te color intensity reflect the usage -> heat map ??

  71. I like "Analyze Wait Chain"     How does that entry work?

  72. Rita says:

    @Alvaro, in Resource Monitor under performance tab, you can still get to that graph view.

  73. SomeoneWhoKnowsAboutApple says:

    @BumbleBritches57 iClod is run by Apple in it's new N.C. data center.

    I also like the idea of a heat map but the graphs in task manager are still nessesary.

  74. The new task manager is concise, effective and adds a lot of functionality/value over the existing one.

    Just beautiful and another proof of were the Windows kernel is heading for, i.e. perfection.

    Keep doing the excellent job you are currently doing, this is what we need from Windows.

  75. Quppa says:

    Looks great, except for the empty SysTabControl32 window at the top. What's going on there?

    The screenshot of the old task manager features the Windows Basic theme window chrome, but all the controls are drawn in the Windows Classic theme style (which is not available in the Windows Developer Preview). Will the Windows Classic theme make a return in Windows 8? (Thanks for making all themes use the DWM, by the way.)

    Again, will 'Direct UI' ever be opened up to the public? Desktop programs will probably never become obsolete, and native developers I'm sure would appreciate a lightweight UI framework.

  76. Tony says:

    Can this run Crysis 2 in DX11 Ultra?

  77. Curious says:

    @Sinofsky,

    Can you write some words about the used hardware?

    1TB memory? 981MB/s HD? Cool stuff.

    Cheers.

  78. Wolf says:

    @Seven Sinofsky

    2 Queston and request regrding the TaskManager

    Can we SAVE both Set Affinity and Set Pirority to Processes so that when one closes and then opens it have the same custome set options liek the above.

    IE : BF3.exe, I set my Affinity to CPU 0,1,2,3 out of 6 totaly and have the Pirorty to Above normal. And when I close the game and re load it can that processes load the setting with out me having to redo it ever time?

  79. Yes, apple runs iCloud out of their north carolina data center, but they use Windows Azure and Amazon EC2 as a redundant backup

    How about you actually read at least one article about the topic. I've been reading about it for months, stop accusing me of being wrong ehen i'm not.

  80. FZB says:

    @wolf

    try to start your program with a batch like this:

    c:windowssystem32cmd.exe /C start /affinity 1 notepad.exe

  81. xpclient says:

    Is the processor affinity saved for that app permanently or it is still reset after it exits? Take a look at this app: http://www.koma-code.de/index.php . It gives more control over CPU affinity. Similar features can be integrated in Task Manager.

    Just a reminder once again: The footprint of Task Manager must be low. The old Task Manager was very efficiently written. Even under the most resource consuming scenarios on the slowest of systems, it would manage to start with Ctrl-Shift-Esc and help to terminate any process that was misbehaving. The new Task Manager's EXE (TM.exe) is 1.36 MB compared to Taskmgr.exe's 222 KB. Memory consumption is 11 MB compared to Taskmgr.exe's 2 MB. You should still heavily optimize it or compile it using a compiler that doesn't emit bloated binaries (I read somewhere on some MSDN blog that Visual Studio 2010 was being used to compile Windows 8?). Also if your goal really is to improve upon the old Task Manager without breaking or removing features as you stated in the earlier post, please fix all of the issues I brought to your attention in the earlier post.

  82. HungryPanda says:

    Can we get more info on consumer oriented features.  Comeon… Give us some news on mouse improvements (over the dev preview), office apps, etc etc.

    Comeon Stevie, I need some Windows 8 goodness…. nom nom nom

  83. HungryPanda says:

    Can we get more info on consumer oriented features.  Comeon… Give us some news on mouse improvements (over the dev preview), office apps, etc etc.

    Comeon Stevie, I need some Windows 8 goodness…. nom nom nom

  84. jm says:

    Heat map is very good but we should be able to check the graph as before. For example there's an error in Windows 7 with IPHelper service – it can make frequently peaks of CPU usage. I experienced this also. If you look for the heat map you won't be able to see what is going on because average usage is not so big but frequent CPU peaks will make whole system sluggish..

  85. Stephane says:

    Hello,

    The Heat map is a good idea, but I think that you didn't finish the job and that Microsoft could/should go further :

    If a user need to look at this heat map, it is reasonable to think that it is to find something wrong, like a process which use too much cpu. Showing a tooltip with the processor ID is one thing (don't know if it's useful), but don't you think that what is really important is to know which process run on this particular processor, and which one is eating about 100%… and i say 100% of the processor, not 100 divided by the number of core (like 12.5% when you have 8 cores).

    I don't know what could be the better GUI for this function, perhaps "show heat map of all the processes running on the processor).

    It makes me a little sad as it seems that like many many times, Microsoft start something with good ideas, but don't "polish" it. I have dozens of examples, like the media center which can't be a "playto" receiver when the media player can…..

  86. That's pretty cool.

    I want to play GTA5 on that beast!!  πŸ˜€

  87. SomeoneWhoKnowsAboutApple says:

    even I cannot believe that apple can be so dumb

  88. Mel Padden says:

    I'm impressed with the way this and other improvements to the Windows UI have been thought through. Keep it up.

  89. Mike says:

    Update the property window from the the local drives as well, the diskspace graphics are from 9X era, and dont fit to the modern design.

  90. Mic says:

    " (up to 640!)" – 640 factorial is a big number :D. Anyhow, i like the changes, keep it up

  91. Zeek says:

    Why don't you put this to metro? so you could view only 6CPU boxes at one time, and to view other you could scroll, that would be so much better, right?

    Or you could made metro to show 160start menu items at the same time…

  92. Parrotlover77 says:

    I LOVE IT!  But… I do use the graphs from time to time as a quick way to view the history of processor usage without having to open up and configure PerfMon.  I hope there's a way to see trends quickly, still.

  93. Alvaro says:

    @Rita Ok you can see historic data in PM

    @those talking about set affinty manualy … i dont think it's a good idea, like the poster said "It is hard to do better than the sophisticated algorithms …", overriding this automated asignation could affect features like Core Parking..

    … About core parking: It's true that it's a perfomance compromise???? I read in some gamers forums that disbling it by reghacks translate in performance boost…i understand that CP work when the system is iddle or with low load .. but maybe the transition from full cores working to some parked and back isn't that good for performance???

    if that's the case Window should include a option to disable Core Parking in some power profiles for gamers and high perfomance usage….

    Alvaro πŸ™‚

  94. g3@live.jp says:

    Requested many times to take this opportunity to Windows 8 team!

    Metro UI font is very beautiful, it is very nice.

    But very, very ugly fonts in Windows.

    Do not consider calligraphy and typography, as no words of Steve Jobs.

    Must be improved to the level of Mac OS X fonts in Windows.

    Double-byte fonts are too severe, especially in Asia, no one'll Nantes ugly, I feel dizzy.

    To show you the fonts watchable level custom applications using as a reference.

    It should always be improved to this level to Windows 8 release.

    Moshimo, ugly as if I have ever been released Windows 8 fonts are converted to the Mac!

    skydrive.live.com

  95. Yvan Rodrigues says:

    What I'd really like to see is the name of the running process of the selected CPU.

    –Yvan @ http://two-red-cells.com

  96. The task manager is completely broken now for identifying misbehaving single-threaded programs, as I mentioned in the previous blog entry on task manager, and as @Skiz, @pip25, and @Stephane have mentioned in this post already.  The old school way on single-CPU computers was to just look at total CPU usage and if it was 100%, an app was hung.  That doesn't work now.

    The % CPU for an individual single-threaded process will never exceed 1% on your fancy 160 core computer, even if the program is misbehaving in an infinite loop and is completely hung!  You could look at the individual logical cores in your fancy new heat map, but then you won't know which misbehaving single-threaded process is sucking up that core.

    One commenter suggested allowing you to drill down into each logical core to see a heat map of what each process is using on that core.  The problem with that is there is no guarantee that the misbehaving single-threaded process will be concentrated on a single core.  The Windows scheduler is free to distribute a single thread across multiple cores.  In the extreme, it could distribute the misbehaving single threaded process across all 160 of your cores.  That means that the process CPU usage will be < 1% and no logical core usage will exceed 1%.  It would not be possible to identify the hung process at that point using the existing user interface.  This is not a hypothetical discussion; I have observed the Windows scheduler doing exactly this on my hyper-threaded quad-core computer.

    The solution is relatively simple and might be as easy as adding a new column to the Processes list:

    CoreLoad=TotalCPUUsagePercentOfProcess * TotalNumberOfLogicalCores / 100

    Since you have so many cores now, you have to do this with floating point numbers and not integers.  If there's a value >= 1 then you know that the process is using at least a complete logical core.  A value approximately equal to 1 means that the process is likely a hung single thread program.  Heat map this appropriately and I think you'd have a very valuable addition.

    (A very interesting feature for developers might be the ability to drill down and view core load for each thread in a process.  But if you can at least do this at the process level, I'd be happy.)

  97. Copy paste? says:

    Will that window with processor percentages of Figure 4 be copy pastable? In a tab delimited format? So I could paste in Notepad, or Excel? You see, screenshot no more enough, because some is hidden.

  98. DarkUltra says:

    @JamesJohnston

    Process Explorer does this, but if that capability was in regular Task Manager we don't have to install Process Explorer on every PC we troubleshoot. The new Windows 8 task manager looks much better too πŸ™‚

  99. Curious says:

    Why is the limit 640? Is there something special about 10 x 2^6 in the current architecture?

  100. I am Windows says:

    Great job. These are the improvements that I want. Features that enhance the user experience, speed, resource usage, efficiency and robustness. Please work on the restoration-of the applications after a failure. Some applications after a failure, a change of settings or removing a file by mistake executables and no longer require formatting the computer, such as Windows Media Player or the wireless network settings that are remembered even after being eliminated. My experience on Windows 7.

  101. I am Windows says:

    Great job. These are the improvements that I want. Features that enhance the user experience, speed, resource usage, efficiency and robustness. Please work on the restoration-of the applications after a failure. Some applications after a failure, a change of settings or removing a file by mistake executables and no longer require formatting the computer, such as Windows Media Player or the wireless network settings that are remembered even after being eliminated. My experience on Windows 7.

  102. Alvaro says:

    @Copy paste?  Great idea…maybe even a export button-> get an xml,clv,or excel file??

    About my preview comment about core parking ..im still wondering if its a perfomance compromise..any toughts??? or maybe im goin to much OT

  103. Maybe it would be possible if the CPU manufactors work on it, that i can deactivate the cores i dont need in the Taskmanger.

  104. @JamesJohnson

    so, you're mad at Microsoft for us having powerful computers? sorry bro, you can also look at the "Application" (should be renamed "Apps") and see which app isn't responding and end it, OR you can just say open iTuens, see that it dosen't work, and close it manually.

    if super fast and efficent computers are our only worries, i think we *** too damn much.

  105. Taylor Hall says:

    This is cool, but let's add more features.  For instance, if I click on a logical processor in the heat map, it pulls up a graph for that processor, along with which processes are running on there.  Those can be killed directly from that.

    Also, there should be a graph view that shows individual usage, but on the same graph, which different processors showing up as different colors.  This allows another good comparison of usage.  You could throw in a pie chart as well into the mix.

    It would definitely then be nice to shutdown certain cores in taskmgr if we don't want to use all 160 cores.

    Also, it would be nice to "sort" the heat map, so we can quickly identify the processors that are doing work and those that are just idling.

    Great work though.  I am very much enjoying the new Task Manager in the developer preview of win8 and serv8.

  106. @Microsoft says:

    Please don't make it an endless features thing. Don't make it super techy. Just add the required and most significant features and ship it. As always, the power user will use the advance tools like process explorer and there is no end to the feature request no matter what you throw at them.

  107. rice says:

    It's off topic, but I must say it here because I know the windows team read. Please, ask Mr. Elop for Nokia tablets!!!! The world need a nokia tablet running Windows 8 ASAP!

  108. Great post Steven I just wanted to know the exact number when the Task Manager is going to use the heat map for the CPU data, Thanks!

  109. dennism0706 says:

    So is this new blue-basic theme going to be the main theme in Windows Server? From, what I've seen the Windows Classic theme is now gone–is this for certain or will it be added back in a later build? I actually don't mind it that much and its much better than aero basic's theme in Vista/7

  110. dennism0706 says:

    So is this new blue-basic theme going to be the main theme in Windows Server? From, what I've seen the Windows Classic theme is now gone–is this for certain or will it be added back in a later build? I actually don't mind it that much and its much better than aero basic's theme in Vista/7

  111. Chris says:

    Will it use the same heatmap interface when there are a small number of cores?

  112. Scrollbar says:

    Is there anyone who is familiar with making custom themes.. I have a question.. can we define our own scrollbar like the one in metro IE (shown in Rita's picture^^)

  113. @Scrollbar

    I make my own theme, it's called Cloud7 and YES we can make our own scrolllbars in the theme.

    the problem, is the DWM WILL NOT ACCEPT a transparent scrollbar, without rendering it as black

    (thanks Microsoft. #sarcasm)

  114. Justwai says:

    will there be a metro-style taskmgr?

  115. Bob says:

    Cannot wait for my first 160 core computer – Great! But has practical limitations.

  116. rfog says:

    What about put in RED those 100% core. They will be seen instantly.

  117. wosborne says:

    I too would like you see and use GPU information in the task manager. Things like % utilization, memory usage and temperature. thanks!

  118. Bob says:

    So this helps something like 0.0001% of Windows users.  What happened to pulling statistics out to justify effort and direction?

    I'm not saying this isn't an important change for a few important users, but where's the consistency here?

  119. Bydia says:

    Are you closing comments on past topics?  We still have more to say…

    My friend had a good idea for the Apps search:  Let apps categories themselves and provide a way to filter apps by Categories.. like: Games, Utilities, Business Apps. etc.

    In the Zune player on the PC the each view level has another list of ways I can view my media collection. Like Music has: Artists, Genres, Albums, Songs, Playlists.  Do the same with every other list in the system.  For Apps: All (Alphabetically by Company), Installed Date, Categorically, etc.   For Settings: All (Alphabetically), Categorically, etc.  

    For Apps I cannot find what was just installed.  Settings now is missing a way for me to browse all settings… it makes me search… but I do not know what I'm looking for.. I just want to browse thru all the settings.

  120. Bydia says:

    Posting here since other raloted areas' comments are closed.  Maybe setup a discussion web for these discussions.

    Photos and videos can have additional meta data added like tags, captions and descriptions.  Allow us to do the same with other files.

  121. Suggestor says:

    Please add the option to view the temperature of the cores. It's a pain to use a 3rd party software for that.

  122. Jay says:

    Useful stuff. Hope you keep revealing more such features until the beta release and maintain the excitement.

  123. @bydia. We decided to close comments on posts after a week since they gradually became unrelated to the post and folks indicate they were moving to forums.

  124. WindowsVista567/mt327000 says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    I'm temporarily breaking my "no comment" rule to say something short. First off, I applaud your new decision to disable comments after a week. Second, to contribute to your usage research, I've posted a picture of my Windows Desktop in this thread: (social.msdn.microsoft.com/…/a72da911-0355-4e85-b337-ab7605bdbe9c).

    @Ryan Haveson

    This new Task Manager design looks great. A heat map is definitely the way to do when handling servers or desktops with many cores. Though, I do admit, blue seems like an odd color choice for a heat map. That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with it, though.

  125. P.S.

    I did post the "WindowsVista567/mt327000" comment displayed above.

  126. This is just a great improvement over the previous the previous task manager. Another great job for Windows. Usually I would start task manager to just go a start resource monitor. Now I can get a preview and be informaed directly. For details I can still launch resource monitor frm within task manager to get extract data on disk activity like which files are actually involed during some disk operations or particular UDP traffic.

    If resource monitor is supposed to go away at some point (now a small less visible link at the bottom somewhere) those specific defails of actually file objects or network addresses involed would be valuable to be able to have directly in the new task manager view.

    Those details are very supportive for some quick pin pointing debugging in sys ops.

    P.s. Getting to know the Metro UI better. I am beginning to understand what immersive and full screen means for virtualization in the UI. It's rather great. Didn't see that in my previous posts. So such screens can be implemented by anyone and binded. The new API's are very well thought trough in seems. There are just many "screens" in the new Windows.

  127. I've got sticky fingers … typos …

  128. One suggestion and question: Will there be an immersive version of Task Manager?

    (i.e. on a 24 inch screen and so, you can do different stuff than tabbed views)

    Regarding the P.S. – the off topic comment: That's it. Problem is not lack of launch virtualization in UI. It's everywhere in WIndows 8. So launch becomes imaginary (and thus harder or more complicated to understand – i.e. there is in fact no single start screen). Users looking for that will tend to think in a "singular" way about that (one point of launching something) – while imaginary means launching does not start or end in any particular place (i.e. some Start Screen). So there you go … virtual. Great. Just explain to user that the current defailt Start Screen is mainly provided for consumers. New WIndows is immersive, there are many screens – and then don't really start or end anywhere special or needs to be related to a Start Screen. That's the hard thing to grasp – may be because of the concept "Start" (f"or all"). Windows Desktop is just another screen. But for all immersive apps – they are their own screen. Somewhat similar to previous WIndows – associations and tool capabilities.

    But that I think is your problem … hammering your head against preceived "introduction" of something new. The NEW Start Screen. A single point for starting everything. Well, not really, right – according to launch in WIndows … nobody launches a lot from Start. Not even legacy Windows. But now you are promising to change that or ? … while the new launch system is actually based on capabilities, file associations and similar events. Be careful of saying the catchy a one and only "A NEW Start Screen" … when you actually decided to remove Start from Windows legacy /nobody used it) because they are really using launch instead of start. Tell people Start Screen just a consumer screen of tiles … and may be skip the concept of Start (since understanding singular conflicts with understanding imaginary, that is launch). There can be other screens. Windows just doesn't have 1 screen or 1 window.

  129. One suggestion and question: Will there be an immersive version of Task Manager?

    (i.e. on a 24 inch screen and so, you can do different stuff than tabbed views)

    Regarding the P.S. – the off topic comment: That's it. Problem is not lack of launch virtualization in UI. It's everywhere in WIndows 8. So launch becomes imaginary (and thus harder or more complicated to understand – i.e. there is in fact no single start screen). Users looking for that will tend to think in a "singular" way about that (one point of launching something) – while imaginary means launching does not start or end in any particular place (i.e. some Start Screen). So there you go … virtual. Great. Just explain to user that the current defailt Start Screen is mainly provided for consumers. New WIndows is immersive, there are many screens – and then don't really start or end anywhere special or needs to be related to a Start Screen. That's the hard thing to grasp – may be because of the concept "Start" (f"or all"). Windows Desktop is just another screen. But for all immersive apps – they are their own screen. Somewhat similar to previous WIndows – associations and tool capabilities.

    But that I think is your problem … hammering your head against preceived "introduction" of something new. The NEW Start Screen. A single point for starting everything. Well, not really, right – according to launch in WIndows … nobody launches a lot from Start. Not even legacy Windows. But now you are promising to change that or ? … while the new launch system is actually based on capabilities, file associations and similar events. Be careful of saying the catchy a one and only "A NEW Start Screen" … when you actually decided to remove Start from Windows legacy (nobody used it – only like the Apps List) because they were really using launch instead of start.

    Tell people Start Screen is just a consumer screen of tiles … and may be skip the concept of Start (since understanding a singular concept like Start conflicts with understanding imaginary, that is launch – thus Start and Launch contradicts just llike singular and imaginary)..

    In other words using the word "Start" will simply block peoples mind from thinking about launch. And Windows previously was never about Start … but launch. Still is – only you are pushing the new "Start Screen" and making every body thinking about the notion of "Start". Pushing that screen should only be as a demo of using tiles. Get it corrected …

    In Windows there can be other immersive screens from where to launch. Windows just doesn't have 1 screen or 1 window.

    But still curious to see how I am going to open my documents immersively … will that be "Document screen"?

  130. >> But still curious to see how I am going to open my documents immersively … will that be "Document screen"?

    … it will be search of coures (hm, no immersive navigation) …

  131. >>Windows just doesn't have 1 screen or 1 window …

    wll, it has … the desktop. So you don't need to look for documents. Nobody simple mr and mrs smith consumer can find anything unless they save it on the desktop, frontpage or really the default view. So new default screen of tiles will have to be easy to save them files to (or integrated pin). Those consumers are really used to not even navigating (1-click only to open documents after booting the machine).

  132. B says:

    Looking Good! Both Task Manager and the new look window.

  133. jason says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    one big problem in any PC is crashing system when insert CD or DVD .

    can you create new algorithm or new  way for this problem.

    threathing IO bus or …

  134. @jason

    The system crash not, when you insert a CD/ DVD! Only the Windows Explorer could not respond, if CD/ DVD can not be read, because of scratches.

  135. jason says:

    @Bastian92, yeah exactly. It can go into seperate thread to avoid the WinXplorer UI frezee!

  136. Can you please get rid of that ugly green from the Metro UI?  My God.. I actually like the Metro UI but that green is so ugly.  It should have landscapes or better backgrounds, but the green is horrible.

  137. mike says:

    Please dont includ both version of the taskmanger in win8. in wdp i have both. only the new one

  138. Stefan says:

    There are third party programs that do better and give info the different types of users want and need. This is too much… I like Your ideas though, but still not what the users want. There are other comments that explain better than i do, so i don't go in to deatails…

  139. Rick says:

    i think windows 8 will be the best OS ever with such power for server's and Workstation's

  140. Bladehawk says:

    1st, the updated task manager is nice, it will make it easier to determine what CPU's are under load.  There is one thing that I have to contest in the article above:

    "For those of you who really like to (micro-) manage every last detail of your system"

    For those of us that like to micro manage our system metro, and therefore windows 8, are deal killers.  I've been running the OS since it came out and metro really gets in the way.  I hate loosing a whole monitor to start an app.  It's jarring and loosing flip 3D is a real hassle.

    I do want to micro manage my PC and I want metro off it.

  141. Valkyrie-MT says:

    I certainly hope that the touch gesture targets are larger than the UI implies with those skinny buttons on the title bar.  

  142. xyz says:

    I might be the only one to find this so but – This design is so windows 95!

  143. Steve says:

    I think it makes windows look more "generic". I do like the clean borders but I think more can be done with it to prevent the generic-look while maintaining Microsoft's new look.

  144. @Steven Sinofsky

    Many people have noticed the new display scheme in the screenshots of the Task Manager in the post above.

    Here is a PCWorld story on this topic:

    http://www.pcworld.com/…/windows_8_desktop_gets_a_taste_of_metro.html

    Just wondering, isn't that theme just the Windows 8 equivalent of Windows Vista Basic? I seem to remember seeing that display style when I changed the theme in my copy of Windows Developer Preview.

    Please don't remove Aero from Windows 8. If anything, Windows 8 needs more Aero-style designs on the desktop than it has today (such as an Aero-style Start Screen).

    The other interesting thing I spotted in that article was that people seem to hate using the Desktop on a tablet as much as I hate using Metro on a desktop PC. Please don't take this as evidence that Metro is better for everything, though.

  145. Rahul says:

    THANK YOU MICROSOFT. ITS ABOUT DAMN TIME PEOPLE REALIZED GLOSSY TRANSPARENCY DOES NOT MEAN DESIGN INNOVATION. FINALLY YOU HAVE THE BALLS TO INNOVATE.

    THANK YOU MICROSOFT. ITS ABOUT DAMN TIME PEOPLE REALIZED GLOSSY TRANSPARENCY DOES NOT MEAN DESIGN INNOVATION. FINALLY YOU HAVE THE BALLS TO INNOVATE.

    THANK YOU MICROSOFT. ITS ABOUT DAMN TIME PEOPLE REALIZED GLOSSY TRANSPARENCY DOES NOT MEAN DESIGN INNOVATION. FINALLY YOU HAVE THE BALLS TO INNOVATE.

    THANK YOU MICROSOFT. ITS ABOUT DAMN TIME PEOPLE REALIZED GLOSSY TRANSPARENCY DOES NOT MEAN DESIGN INNOVATION. FINALLY YOU HAVE THE BALLS TO INNOVATE.

    THANK YOU MICROSOFT. ITS ABOUT DAMN TIME PEOPLE REALIZED GLOSSY TRANSPARENCY DOES NOT MEAN DESIGN INNOVATION. FINALLY YOU HAVE THE BALLS TO INNOVATE.

  146. Coffee says:

    Please, IΒ΄m ok with no glossy and minimalist desing but PLEASE, don't combine dark blue with black typography… the perfect contrast is white

  147. Razor says:

    This is a good start but what is with the chrome? Why not take cues from Zune and create pivots instead of tabs? This looks like some sort of unholy marriage of Metro and Aero. It's about time the entire Windows UI was transformed to look like Zune/Metro.

  148. darksomos says:

    Glad to see Windows 8 smoothly scaling even the little details extraordinarily.

    Also, these screenshots may be from a server variant of Windows 8,

    which has Aero off for obvious reasons (servers have to focus on more important things).

    Heck, I don't even know if server edition allows Aero at all.

  149. How many possible articles can there be about Task Manager? This is like the 4th! It's not a feature consumers are (or at least should be) using frequently, and the same goes for developers. The only reason I have to fire up task manager is because your metro-style WInRT programs keep playing music even and game sounds even after I navigate away from them, and I have no other way to close them.

    I know you guys did something else in the desktop. C'mon. How about Voice, which you've had forever in WIndows and the amazing Microsoft Voice Command in Pocket PC, but never really developed? Then Tell Me was bought and nothing of note went into it, so now Siri makes it look silly? How about the Voice Macros worked on by people like Rob Chambers that could have become a part of Windows but was ignored? Make an API for voice and put it in Windows and Windows Phone.

    Or when will we know how media will be handled? I'm sure there'll be some big reveal about the XBox Live brand swallowing the Zune brand.. how about telling us whether Windows Media Player (which I stumbled on in Win8 purely by accident) will be one and the same as the Zune player? Or that WMP will be as functional as WMP11 again, with proper tag editing (and multiple genre support)?

    So many applets to hear news about.. will Picasa always have a cooler photo viewer than Windows? Will the behavior of the taskbar be fixed so that clicking cycles through windows?

    Sure it's only November, but Windows is a big big thing. Even for unfinished features, you can give us insight into what's in store for some feature other than Task Manager. If you gave us a post per day per feature, it would last until launch next year

  150. magicalclick says:

    Off-topic, this is reply to the orientation blog since I cannot post reply for unknown reason.

    Hello, I just want to say, the demo of portrait has small fonts, and it is not good for my eyes. Is there anyway I can make the fonts larger? Thank you.

  151. magicalclick says:

    For the task manager,

    can we have something simple for HDD monitor? Like many times when my computer is slow, it is busy doing HDD work. And it is hard to know which process is responsible for the problem because it spikes when multiple process shares the same HDD queue. I just want something simple that tells me what is the culprit that eat up my HDD activites. Thank you.

  152. UserInterface says:

    @Microsoft

    Does anyone read these comments after the article being posted?

    There seem to be some very good points (and some bad) mentioned here. How do we know if you are just telling us "this is how it’s going to be", or if you are taking these suggestions on board?

  153. LD says:

    @craig.smikle

    Aside from a new files system I don't think they have anything more for PC users.

    Congrats on making a nice tablet OS, now please go and build a PC operating system.  This is nice for developers, but is a downgrade for PC users.  Metro, aad the start screen are atrocities.

  154. LD says:

    @UserInterface

    They are willing to look at small changes based on prior posts, but ignore those of us that think Metro is a bad idea for desktops.

  155. @LD You might be interested in downloading the brief guide that provides an overview of the features in the Developer Preview.  download.microsoft.com/…/Windows_Developer_Preview-Windows8_guide.pdf

    @magicalclick — Click on the Resource Monitor from task manager or Start Screen — that is a great place to diagnose this sort of activity.

  156. "…it is now easy to see all the logical processors at a glance and know which are being utilized to high and low capacity."

    …Except that you have to hover on cells to get CPU & Node #. This is because logical processors are sorted by processor ordinal, with current load percent displayed in the cell (along with heat map color/gradient). Alternatively, a useful option might be to sort by processor load, with the CPU & Node # displayed in the cells, and hovering on a cell gives you the load percent. Now if the heat map is as useful as claimed, it should be able to provide enough info "on its own", for users to determine at a glance what processors have high usage or not, and be able to get a clearer picture on what *portion* of processors have high or low load. What is more important, seeing what processor numbers have high load within a range, or knowing a processors more exact load at that instant, but probably having to hover to get processor details? So i'm suggesting a 'Sort by load' option should be added to the context menu.

    A couple of issues this option would highlight are:

    1. There is no key to determine what the heat map color gradients refer to in terms of load range, and there is no space for a key even if it was deemed desirable.

    2. The higher the load, the darker the color displayed in the cell, so the contrast ratio of cell color to numerical data gets worse at higher values, possibly the opposite of what would be preferably in terms of readability. (What might work better is to grey-out cells with low load, and use semi-bold and bold text in cells with high load. A more colorful option would be to use more of the color spectrum to indicate high/low load.)

    Issue 1 could be resolved if the Performance tab was freed of Task Manager and became a standalone app. Each resource type could get its own tab, and the CPU tab could include a key – or – a tab could be added called something like Notes or Troubleshooting, that included the key plus links to relevant KB articles. Having a seperate app would also mean users could look at performance and process data side-by-side.

    A more general issue is that the cells can only display instantaneous data. What would be really interesting to see is average load over a period, either in sort by ordinal or sort by load view. For either view, the user could determine at a glance how *evenly* processors were being loaded, and of course the absolute loadings. The evenness of processor load over a known period might help when manually configuring process-processor affinities.

    A couple of small points regarding the Details tab:

    1. The 'CPU' field should be renamed 'Load%'

    2. 'Memory (private working set)' should be renamed 'PWS (MB)'

    3. The memory field should display amounts in the format MB.#

    4. The left to right order of fields should match the MSB -> LSB sequence, which is probably; Image, CPU, Memory, User name, Description.

  157. LD says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    I've seen the before thank you, I meant there's no new information. The one button rebuild is nice, but aside from that and a better copy/Task manager there's not much reason to upgrade.  For PC users this isn't as significant an upgrade as windows 7 or XP was.

    The limited new features, removal of functionality, (Flip 3D, starting apps without loosing my screen) and the additional overhead (I mean steps for the power user during day to day work) means there is no compelling reason to upgrade and, IMHO, significant reason to avoid the new OS.

  158. Picea says:

    640 logical processors ought to be enough for anybody…

  159. Mark Balan says:

    When is next blog be released? (sorry for the bad english)

  160. Jadefish says:

    Please at least try to have consistent font subrendering throughout the UI. The heat map picture featuring 160 processors is VERY inconsistent. The menu items and "Logical processors" string are rendered without cleartype, whereas the window title, tabs, and other elements are rendered with cleartype.

    I do realize that this IS a beta, but these kinds of problems exist currently in Windows 7, even in SP1 (which is certainly NOT a beta-stage product). Small UI inconsistencies like this need to be fixed before release.

  161. LW says:

    Jadefish was right. Windows 7 UI is currently a mixture of Segoe UI (mostly) with MS San Serif, Tahoma and even Arial

    I must use a simple registry hack to make all font displayed in Segoe UI. To make them CONSISTENT.

    Please fix this. And prolem above, too

  162. LongARM says:

    Muuhhaha bruhahaha XD *fell down from chair*

    No Ms you don't need to do it. Who the **** has a computer like this? In the future, over 6 years there won't be laptops or desktop pcs like this. What is it? HAARP's computer or UFO-recognizer? Maybe space research or Milky Way-mapping PC? It simply has no sense. This pc is more than a server with 1024gb RAM! Nobody has pc like this.

    Some tip (I read the information from your XPS):

    – ultrabook

    – tablet

    – all-in-one built desktop pcs

    These are for the 0,01% or population! Ultrabook too costly, tablet (no comment), all-in-one is really rare.

    Why can't optimize screen and metro thingies for a normal 15,6" or 10,1" laptop/desktop pc?

    You always look the extreme situations not a normal – in windows 8!

    And: Please tell me somebody why is so beautiful the Metro?

    And… who wants only social and messaging apps?

    !!!You even now can't convice me why so good this windows 8. Good luck for windows 9 where maybe a normal UI with more new functions.!!!

    But grat for ribbon UI.

  163. Sir Miscel says:

    That's so old, my operating system, Coturnix OS is even more stable than the Mac, just try it out!

    You'll get impressed of it's functions!

  164. Nate says:

    @Steven

    I'm curious to see how the major productivity tools work in Windows 8.  Our business runs on MS, and I foresee that user adoption of the new metro apps/windows 8 will be driven by how 'useable' Office and Lync will be on this new platform.

    Is there a commitment to release a version of Lync that works well in then new app format / metro – when 8 releases?  This really is the lynchpin for us when it comes to adoption.

  165. Lucy says:

    Will there be a Metro interface for Task Manager?  Some of the less experienced users may appreciate the experience of having their 640 cores displayed in grid format.  They could arrange them into groups perhaps having their favourite cores listed on the first page.  Maybe in an 8 x 4 grid, I’d list the prime cores first, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13 etc then have a secondary group of less preferential cores, maybe the evens.  If that was too large I could always pop in an active Gallery app or Weather app tile to make the experience of scrolling through 20 windows worth of cores to see them all more exciting.  Also, can you make the Heat Map use reds, if they are blue then surely feeling them on a tablet they would be cool, make then reds and you could feel, nay experience, the core temperature. That would be cool.

  166. A few points on Win7 versus Win8 TM Performance tab, and related stuff.

    "When you are looking at a CPU graph for lots and lots of logical processors, it is the anomalies that are interesting. At scale, it is pretty hard to compare moving line graphs of a 60-second window of CPU utilization to understand what is going on."

    Is it hard to understand because the graphs are too small, because the graphs are moving, because the use of graphs overwhelms the user with information, or some combination of these? It seems to be inconsistent to be claiming that what is interesting are the anomalous graphs, but then state that these are difficult to find because doing comparisons of graphs is hard. The first is a reference of graph data to graph grid, whereas the second is a reference of graph to graph. Also, what you're saying implicitly here is that viewing recent CPU history of very many processors is not very helpful when trying "to understand what is going on", but viewing constantly changing instantaneous values is. How was this conclusion reached? You're really begging the question as to why graphs help in understanding what is going on in the case of relatively few processors, but not for many, and conversely, why a constantly changing number works well for lots of processors, but not for a few. There is also the question of what is meant in this context by the term 'anomalies' – once again not specifically defined. How does a user learn what an anomalie is, and how the heat map can implicitly indicate an anomalie, without even providing a key to indicate what the range of color intensities is indicating? A gradient map without a key has limited value.

    You seem to be bringing a "Task Manager mentality" to the understanding of performance data that may not be appropriate. In a datacenter or server farm, the emphasis would be on *maximizing* resource utilization, so that high CPU usage would in general be regarded as a good thing (because of the desire to minimize hardware requirements), and therefore that 'anomalie' in this context means, if anything, *low* utilization. With Task Manager, the traditional attitude has been that high utilization represents some sort of fault or error that needs to be rectified by a user – high = bad/fault, low = good/normal. In contrast, the engineering of datacenter server loads would be on the basis – high = efficient, low = inefficient. Also, with "rogue" processes, you are more interested in instantaneous values, whereas performance data *should be* history-oriented. These to me are other good reasons why the Performance tab should be removed from Task Manager entirely, and a new app created specifically for monitoring this performance data. Doing this may also reduce the risk that these new heat maps are going to be seen as indicative of implicit value judgements about what is right/good/normal and what isn't. Please consider that the important point here from a users PoV is that any understanding low/normal/high/anomalous processor utilization has to be on the basis of – compared to what?

    "If you do identify an anomalous graph, there is no easy way to get the corresponding processor ID."

    Of course that has nothing to do with the use of graphs versus cells – rather its simply means that Win8 TM supports tooltips, whereas Win7 TM does not. More importantly, if identifying processor IDs is important, then why is the display of processors in Win8 DP indicating utilization in two ways (color gradient + numerical value), but not the processor ID until the users hovers on each "anomalous" cell, one-by-one? Surely if the heat map can unambiguously display zero/low/normal/high/anomalous utilization, then the default numerical value in the cells should be the processor ID, and not a more accurate indicator of what the heat map is already representing?

  167. pmbAustin says:

    Is there a touch-based way to 'hover' in order to get the tool-tip info?

  168. again-repeat-again says:

    @Steven Sinofsky,

    The PDF file you linked above is exactly what is wrong with Win8 for the desktop.

    Please re-read it and listen to all here that keep telling you the same thing: Metro on Desktop is Death to Windows.

  169. Tink5150 says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    Bring back The Courier project  running windows 8 on a dual screen tablet!

    Also fix the windows 8 experience for the desktop interface.

  170. @again-repeat-again says:

    Why you even bother is beyond me, it's a start menu.

  171. DCMonkey says:

    Looks good. Will any of this UI improvement make it any deeper into the desktop UI of Windows 8? For example, will Control Panels that never got "Aeroized" in Vista/7 get some attention? Or more desperately, will the terrible UIs of many of the MMC Admin Tools get an overhaul (I'm thinking the Event Viewer, Task Scheduler, and to some extent, the Resource Monitor here)?

  172. Tyler says:

    That is exactly right @Tink5150. If Metro is the default UI for windows , it looks like i'm getting a mac…..

  173. pmbAustin says:

    Some other topics I'd like to see covered:

    Media player enhnacements

    Future of Media Player vs. Zune vs. Media Center

    FileSystem enhancements

    Device Manager/Management enhancements

    Printing from Metro apps

    Areo/Desktop UI improvements (please, font consistency at least?)

    Security improvements (more info on Windows Defender vs. MSE)

    Windows Live Essentials integration (calendering? contacts? events?)

    Notifications in both Desktop and Metro worlds

    Multi-tasking in Metro, Desktop, and both together (management, flow, effeciency, etc)

  174. Always On Top says:

    Can we add the always on top to all windows?

    Sometimes I am copying files and wish to keep it on top (there are heaps of other times I want it to). Would be good if it was just hidden in the icon on the top left of all windows (the one that double click closes the window) so I don't need another tool to do it all the time.

  175. @Microsoft

    you all should build in 7-Zip for compression and decompession right into Explorer. it's opensource, and would support MUCH more formats.

  176. alex says:

    @Steven Sinofsky

    one algorithm for CD-DVD Running.

    if inserted CD-DVD to system >> EXPLORER.EXE run cdexplorer.exe >> cdexplorer.exe run cd-dvd contents.

    without busy explorer.exe or freezing Desktop .

  177. Karl says:

    @ alex :this would be a real "innovation" , the solution of a very old problem. Or still better,  uncouple

    shell and file explorer!

  178. Nitz Walsh says:

    "Bring back The Courier project  running windows 8 on a dual screen tablet! "

    Considering Mr. Sinofksy is reportedly one of the reasons Courier was killed, I'd say you're asking the wrong person. πŸ™‚

  179. Nitz Walsh says:

    "Bring back The Courier project  running windows 8 on a dual screen tablet! "

    Considering Mr. Sinofksy is reportedly one of the reasons Courier was killed, I'd say you're asking the wrong person. πŸ™‚

  180. Tink5150 says:

    @Nitz Walsh

    So Mr. Sin cannot recognize a good idea when he see's one.  Still never hurts to plant the seed.

  181. rhelmer says:

    I'm not sure if anyone has requested this yet, but… it would be absolutely fantastic to be able to point the Task Manager at a remote computer for troubleshooting and system admins, similar to how you can point other admin tools like Computer Management, Services, etc. Right now, it seems the best alternative is the PsList CLI tool or PerfMon, but the new Task Manager is so lovely and useful that it'd be a shame if you could use it locally only!

  182. @but you have remote desk to do this, what do you need more?

  183. rhelmer says:

    @Bastian92

    Remote Desktop takes over the user's computer, disconnecting their session and logging in as someone else. If someone reports slowness or erratic behavior, it's tremendously useful to let them continue working as normal while monitoring their machine using remote diagnostic tools. It also becomes an issue of screen real estate if the issue occurs only while working in an application and Task Manager obscures too much of their workspace. Also, sometimes you have issues where a machine is misbehaving and you cannot connect to a machine via Remote Desktop, but other remote administrative utilities still work–it would be very useful to be able to fire up Task Manager and see what kind of activity is happening.

  184. Over all I like the new task manager.  It has a nice style to it.  The heat map is a good idea, though you will want to retain the ability to display usage over time charts.  If you want to you could even combine them.  As an example, Ganglia uses a heat map with the usage over time chart inside of each box.

    I'll second the request to be able to view remote performance data.  There are other ways to do that, so it's not vital.

    I'm sorry all of the start-screen comment fields are locked.  There were a few things I wanted to suggest.

  185. If It is possible. I want to feature measure the temperature of the device such as smartphone, pc(graphic card cpu mainboard), notebook in native design too.

  186. VanOne says:

    Well the changes to the task manager are quite welcome, however the rest of the UI like Windows Explorer and the Desktop seem to give more of an Office 2007-ish feeling, instead of the Metro UI look and feel. Why haven't the design principles that have been applied to the Control Panel (which looks awesome), not been applied to these other screens as well? Because of that the overall UI just doesn't seem uniform across the OS.