Metro style browsing: one engine, two experiences, no compromises


We are very happy to have received such a warm welcome from developers yesterday as we kicked off a pretty big opportunity with Windows 8. Our focus on B8 now moves to the Developer Preview and what is in it and how it evolves. We hope those choosing to participate in the blog are installing and using the build. While it is early and focused on developers, it is also quite fun to use. I am doing all my posts from the conference via the Samsung Preview tablet!

We wanted to talk some about Metro style browsing and the work we have done to deliver a truly chromeless browsing experience.  We are very much focused on HTML5 and standards support with the very best performance and reliability along with IE’s well-regarded safety features. We also continue to evolve and deliver the desktop experience that uses the same HTML5 technologies. That’s how we deliver a no-compromise browsing experience with IE10. This post describes the IE10 platform preview 3 in Windows 8 developer preview. Dean authored this post. –Steven

There’s so much more to moving the browser experience forward than just putting it on a touch device. To deliver the best browsing across any form factor running Windows 8, we re-imagined the experience of the web browser and the underlying architecture.

Our approach in Windows 8 starts with one great HTML5 browsing engine that powers two different experiences. The single engine provides strong support for web standards, hardware-accelerated performance, security, privacy, and more. Then, we built two experiences on top of that engine: a new Metro style experience as well as a more traditional, current-generation desktop browser with tabs and relatively minimal “chrome.”

The result is that you can carry one device and it provides both experiences without compromise, acting as an immersive tablet and a flexible laptop. You can have both experiences on a powerful multi-monitor desktop as well – no compromise.

You’ll get the best immersive, touch-first experience of HTML5 websites with the Metro style browser in Windows 8. If you prefer more traditional window and tab management, you have that in improved form with IE on the desktop. Both run on the same IE10 engine.

While building the entirely new Metro style experience, a funny thing happened: we realized it might just be a better way to browse even if you have a big screen, a desktop computer, and a mouse and keyboard. While it’s a touch-first browser, it works well with keyboard and mouse or trackpad. If you’ve been doing more and more browsing on your phone, then you’ve likely become used to having almost no “chrome,” far more visual tab management, and a more immersive, less “desktop”-y, more manual browsing experience. You might find that you prefer the new Metro style experience of Internet Explorer 10 to the desktop.

Just as a reminder: the Metro style browser in the current Windows Developer Preview is for developers, not consumers. There is work ahead with the developer community to make the experience consumer-ready (for example, having sites update older, out-of-date libraries that don’t work well with IE10, or making sure that sites that already run plug-in free for other devices work that way with the Metro style browser).

One engine, two experiences

Because great HTML5 support on both desktop IE and the Metro style IE is so important, we adapted the IE10 engine’s architecture to power both experiences. The two experiences share browsing history, typed addresses, settings, and more. The common engine delivers a consistently fast, safe, and powerful experience for today’s sites as well as Metro style applications:

  • Performance. Metro style IE has the same industry-leading performance as IE on the desktop. This includes full hardware acceleration of graphics, video, and audio, compiled JavaScript, and new layout and formatting engine optimizations for touch responsiveness.
  • Safety. Metro style IE also has the same industry-leading security, privacy, and reliability features as IE on the desktop. This includes SmartScreen, XSS filtering, and InPrivate browsing.
  • HTML5. Metro style IE delivers the same commitment to a richer HTML5 web programming model as IE on the desktop. At BUILD, we introduce new support for CSS Text Shadow, CSS 3D Transforms, IndexedDB, Web Sockets, HTML5 File APIs, HTML5 History, hyphenation, CSS Transitions and Animations, and HTML5 Application Cache, in addition to the other new features previously shown in IE10 Platform Previews.

You can read more about desktop IE and technical details of the underlying Trident browser engine and Chakra JavaScript engine on the IE Blog.

Re-imagining the browser as a Metro style app

When we re-imagined the browser as a Metro style app, we saw a totally new way to move the web forward.

For example, the Metro style is immersive. For a web page in Metro style IE, there are no visual distractions at all. You can use standard gestures to get to functionality that otherwise distracts you from the web. You can search and share from Metro style IE using “charms,” just as you do in other Metro style apps. You can use the Devices charm, for example, to play and project videos from web pages to external devices. You can “snap” IE side-by-side with another Metro style application. Using websites and Metro style apps together is easy because we built them to work together.

The new Metro style is much more than a visual design. For example, it enables you to get to your important sites with less typing. You see a touch-friendly, visual list of your frequent and pinned websites when you open a new tab or bring up the address bar:

Image showing several tiles under the heading "Frequent" and  several under the heading "Pinned" and below that, the web address bar with onscreen keyboard
A
touch-friendly, visual list of your frequent and pinned web sites in the Metro style browser

Typing in the address bar filters this list. When you bring up your open tabs, the address bar is immediately available so you can get to the site you want if it’s not already open:

Image of the Metro style browser open to the BUILD website, with several open tabs above the webpage, and the address bar at the bottom of the screen.
Open tabs and the address bar in the Metro style browser

Spell-checking and auto-complete also reduce how much typing you need to do as you use sites. Notice that you can even browse with InPrivate and Tracking Protection.

To make the websites you care about easy to get to and work with, you can pin them to the new Windows 8 Start screen, the same way you pin Metro style apps there.

Pinning a site to the Start screen
Pinning a site to the Start screen

IE10 draws controls (like check boxes and radio buttons) with more space around them to be more touch-friendly. Developers can make their web pages much more touch-friendly using standard web patterns like CSS to style controls. For example, below you see an HTML5 range input type control with a custom background image:

HTML5 Control with custom background image in IE10, in Chrome, and in Mozilla Firefox
HTML5 control with custom background image in IE10 (top), in Chrome (bottom left),
and in Mozilla Firefox (bottom right)

Metro style IE supports touch panning and pinching to zoom. Pages are fast and fluid like the rest of the system because the HTML5 engine takes advantage of full hardware acceleration. You can see this in the scrolling and panning performance.

Here’s a demo that shows the performance as well as other parts of the browsing experience:


Download this video to view it in your favorite media player:
High quality MP4 | Lower quality MP4

Metro style IE: looking ahead

We see new opportunities to move the web forward as a result of this new browser experience. There is work ahead with site developers to take full advantage of it. Touch is very important, and so is the immersive experience. The opportunities here are huge, given how much time people spend on the web today.

The current Windows Developer Preview is for developers, not consumers. For example, there’s work ahead to make sure that sites that already run plug-in free for other devices can work that way in IE10. Similarly, some sites may need to update older, out-of-date libraries that don’t work well with IE10. Including the current desktop style browser to deliver the compatibility that people expect from a Windows release is also important.

Pessimists may criticize what they will call “two browsers.” There’s only one browsing engine, which you can use with two different “skins.” Over time, the Metro style experience will serve more and more mainstream browsing scenarios, even as the desktop browser continues to play a key role in many people’s lives. You can set your default to either style, seamlessly switch between them, or use any other browser you choose on Windows 8.

Pessimists may also try to debate how much they need or don’t need different aspects of each browser style. If you want to stay permanently immersed in that Metro world, you can. You won’t even see the desktop, and Windows will not load the code unless you explicitly choose to launch it. But if you do see value in the desktop experience – in precise control, in powerful windowing and file management, in compatibility with plug-ins – those capabilities are just a finger tap away. In the architecture and design, we’ve been very deliberate to provide a no-compromise experience for your needs, even if you carry only one device. So, browse where you’re comfortable.

Dean Hachamovitch

Comments (96)

  1. Jarrich says:

    Since when does Firefox has such huge tabs? Going the Apple way Microsoft with Photoshopping evidence?

  2. raymond says:

    some of the metro elements look really bad especially when it's a solid black color rectangle housing all the buttons/tabs.

    on the desktop side the tabs are too sharply corned (way too square) and more importantly way to close. there is no space between the tabs creating a very ugly look. Tabs like the windows media player look much less severe and jarring.

  3. raymond says:

    adding a little depth to metro would be nice instead of everything being so flat to the point where it's legibility/visibility is lost.

  4. raymond says:

    a bit of chrome for metro would be better than being severely flat. such as the typography that only works when the background is a solid color but when it's a detailed image, it is barely visible.

  5. Groundpeak says:

    @Jarrich Stopped to think that that might be a touch-optimised version of Firefox?

  6. @Jarrich – I took the screenshot of Firefox – it's just the current public Firefox release – and I was surprised that the tabs were that large, too, but couldn't explain it.  

    If you’d like, you can run the same code yourself.  The page is a code sample for new Form Controls.  You can download it at the link below.  The example in the screenshot is the Range control.

    code.msdn.microsoft.com/…/Form-controls-part-1-abae6a9e

    John Hrvatin [msft]

  7. Love it, I must say the ability to share from any app to any app is something I've never seen before, ever! I can't imagine the behind the scenes work to get this working correctly so hats of to the entire team for that!

  8. @Jarrich, I guess is the usual Fx behavior… Ain't Photoshopping for sure. Some times, if you add something out of the normal specification on the nav-bar, stretches the UI. Generally, Fx's UI breaks easily. At the moment, certainly, Fx isn't designed to work on Win 8. If the Screenshot was on Windows Basic Mode, you'd notice Fx loses its colors. and again, you could say "Photoshopping".

    Although, I've installed Nightlies 9 x64 and nothing has been broken apart of that ( in basic mode ).

  9. nou says:

    thanks for this article…

    find another similar article at http://newsonlineupdate.com

  10. Alireza Noori says:

    There are moments in the video that Jane is not sure whether she's clicked on the link or not and she moves her hand to click that again. That shows a problem. There should be an indication that the page is loading in the Metro style IE. One more thing. I haven't used the IE10 yet (downloading…) but I couldn't find the option for InPrivate browsing and the tools button (for instance printing, saving to file, Internet options, etc). Where are those?!

  11. The metro style goes great on my phone but I'm having my doubts about how it would work on a tablet alongside of the typical Windows themed desktop.

    Can't wait to get home… this is more exciting than going on Christmas break!

  12. w1ngnut says:

    The video says for itself. The integration between apps on W8 is all I ever wanted and the demos show it's rocking! Great work MS!!!

  13. Briantist says:

    I guess this Metro-thing really going to have to be a "grower" because it just seems, at first glance, utterly vile.

    I'm trying to think of putting it in front of people in a business and explaining why you spend loads of money to upgrade from Windows 7 to what seems like Windows Vista II.

    Everything seems just vile.  The colours are vile.  The scrolling boxes are vile.  The switching between green-land and desktop-land is vile.  

    Some things HAVE HUGE SHOUTY FONT LAYOUTS ("Control Panel") and other things are tiny.

    It's not a user interface, Microsoft, sorry, this is FAIL written big  letters – on a green background.

    I want my start menu back.  I don't mind if I have to press CTRL or something I just want to be able to pin a programme to the bar at the bottom.  I know I can registry hack it back, but that's not the point.

    I can't get over how presumptive the "Weather" application is.  It seems to have worked out that I live near the sea and is providing pictures of a sandy beach.

    Except I don't live in California and we have, and are very happy with, pebbles on our beach.

    More annoying is that you can't scroll the silly start menu replacement by dragging on the background, you have to use an awful scroll bar at the bottom.

    I much prefer Android Honeycomb to be honest.  I can make gadgets my size, I can have my own background.

    Windows 8 is just, well, square.

  14. Joe Capel says:

    Really looking forward to B8. This is the release I have been waiting for since I was a kid. I'm downloading the DEV preview now. I'm really hoping it all comes together as expected. Single most exciting feature, roaming profiles!!! I hate to say that is is about time M, but it's about time. No longer have to relay on chrome to keep all fo my internet settings/favs/history saved. Yaa Hoo!!

  15. ServerDude says:

    Hello Microsofties!  

    When will we be able to get the preview bits for Windows Server 8 without purchasing an MSDN license?

    Can we get it now with just a TechNet or Action Pack license?

    Thank You!!!!

  16. RichardDeeming says:

    How about the IE WebBrowser control embedded in other applications? When will we be able to tell the control to use the latest engine (instead of the sucky IE7 engine) without hacking the registry?

    http://www.west-wind.com/…/Web-Browser-Control-Specifying-the-IE-Version

  17. Quppa says:

    > IE10 draws controls (like check boxes and radio buttons) with more space around them to be more touch-friendly.

    This makes sense for the Metro style interface, but can we get the traditional style back for the desktop interface? The scroll bars in particular clash with Aero. (And mouse hover effects are missing in at least IE8 and IE9 – it would be nice if you could update your owner-drawn versions to support that.)

  18. revanmj says:

    I hope that you will add normal bookmarks to Metro IE. I know about pinned sites, but I don't want every site I bookmark, to be visible on my Start screen, removing them manually isn't too comfortable (there seem to be no way to pin site in IE, but not add it to Start screen). And with pinned sites there is no way to organize them into folders (which is necessary when you have 100+ bookmarks).

  19. raider says:

    IE10 is simply great. Finally the unique refresh/stop button and the spellchecker. But… Please, restore the old scrollbars in IE10 desktop, they are good for Metro UI but not for classic interface, looks awkward. And too many issues with websites, even with compatibility mode, I ended up installing Chrome. I hope for the Beta to use IE10, 'cause I liked it very much.

  20. Coder says:

    @JohnHrv [MSFT]

    What I learned from that demo is that once again MS is driving ahead with making up their own non-standards.  What on earth is #steps::-ms-thumb supposed to be?

    Please tell me that those of us writing metro apps using js/html5 won't constantly being held back by ie's continual shoddy and non-standard "support"

  21. alvatrus says:

    It looks like the two experiences are for completely different tasks.

    One is a media consumer UI, like movies, photos, social, browsing, etc. The typical tablet environment.

    Then there is the business end, represented by the traditional desktop. For example the Office-line, photo-editing and other traditional desktop applications.

    Why can't we switch between these interfaces, Metro vs. desktop (i.e.: Ctrl+Start+Alt, for example, *and stay in that interface.*

    If I want to share a snippet from the desktop environment, I can copy it, jump to Metro with the 3-finger keypress, share my snippet and jump back. (Also, this would work the other way around.)

    I love the desktop, and I am impressed by Metro, but don't mix them. They represent completely incompatible workflows/types of work.

  22. Awesome says:

    I think it looks awesome.

    I love the tiles. It's so much better than icons. They are alive!

    Can't wait.

  23. Will we ever see plugin support (Silverlight and Flash) in the Metro style browser?

    If not, what is the justification for it?

    iPad gets tons of criticism for only showing "part of the web" and the benefit of PCs has always been the no-compromise features — but now we must compromise and live with the same iPad restrictions if we want the cool tablet look and feel.

  24. 6205 says:

    I am sure that final theme will be more polished. Loking forward to new blogs regarding new msstyle progress report…

  25. fotis says:

    Really good job guys!!

    Keep up the good work.

  26. UberUrban says:

    Using windows 8 on desktop just doesnt feel right…feels like im using a touch device with a defunct touch screen…doesnt look like its meant for the desktop/laptop users 🙁

    *sigh*

  27. Kevin Menzel says:

    The once compromise that seems to have been made is in plugin support – is there a particular reason that plugins that fine in the "desktop" ie don't work at all in the Metro ie? Flash is one of the biggies I'm thinking about.. web browsing without being able to watch old Strongbad e-mails just doesn't feel right…

  28. Keith Nicholas says:

    "Pessimists may criticize…."          I thought the point of all this was to get alternative opinions.   If you are going to defend your decisions and not listen to feedback and continue to try and convince us to drink the 'kool aid' you are going to end up making big mistakes.   Microsoft have done this before, tried to rev everyone up, tell us its great only a bit later to go….oh, woops, we missed the mark.

    A lot of people are having concerns with this split personality operating system, and having played with the developer preview, I'm really not conviced by all this.    This whole re-imagining seems to actually lack imagination….. it more seems to be less about imagination and more about trying to marry two UIs, one for touch, one for desktop and trying to get UX designers to make it work.  

  29. Mitchell Jones says:

    This makes me excited just seeing how cool Windows 8 will be.

  30. Jeremy says:

    On topic with this post (all of this typed from the metro browser!):

    So far, I am very impressed and delighted with what I have seen about Windows 8! However, there are some rough edges related to missing features and the user experience when using Metro without touch. These are things that I'm sure will improve as this is only a developer preview.

    Why doesn't the Metro browser have a favorites feature? Do you plan to add this in later? I have a ton of bookmarks. I don't use all of my bookmarks frequently, so I do not want to pin them all to my Start screen. For example, I have a bunch of links in a "Research" folder that I might save for later and do not access on a regular basis.

    I plan to use an ARM tablet running in the Metro UI most of the time. I'd like to do a lot of web surfing this way, but if I have to stick all of my bookmarks on the start screen, things will get cluttered very quickly.

    It feels strange having two browsers that don't sync together. I expected to be able to see my favorites in both browsers. I also expected that if I switched between the desktop and metro browsers, they would both be showing the same tabs and all. Almost like they are the exact same instance only with two UIs.

    ==

    Off topic with this post: I also wanted to mention my thoughts on using Metro without touch.

    Windows 8 will clearly dominate all tablets. Next to Metro, the iPad and Android tablets out there look like Barbie's First Tablet. However, using Metro with a mouse and keyboard makes me feel trapped. I feel like I should be able to touch everything but can't. Using a mouse within Metro makes me feel like I'm using some kind of work around to be able to operate my computer.

    You have to do a lot of horizontal scrolling. Most applications don't support the scroll wheel so you end up having to physically drag the scroll bar. If every horizontal scrolling app supported the scroll wheel, this wouldn't be so bad. With my laptop's touchpad, this results in constant finger swiping to see things off screen. Making sure Home+End and PageUp+PageDown are supported in all apps for horizontal scrolling would make things easier.

    Here are some random negatives I have noticed while using Metro so far. Take these with a grain of salt as I realize this is a dev preview only. It just makes me feel better to voice them so I feel like they won't be overlooked:

    – You -have- to add a Windows Phone style multi tasking UI to Metro. Please! Please! I feel like I am playing a shuffle game flipping between apps. Which app will come up next? Nobody knows!!

    – You -have- to add a way to close Metro apps. I know that they consume no resources and Windows manages them in a glorious way. I still want to be able to close Metro apps so they don't pollute my list of running apps. As I open more and more apps, it gets harder and harder to find the app I am looking for when I want to switch to it. I beg you Mr. Sinofsky. Please. Let me close my apps. They don't even have to close. Just hide them from my app switching list.

    – It took me forever to figure out that clicking in the bottom left brings up the Charms menu. This is not discoverable at all. Hopefully you guys will fix that so users can find it.

    – Why isn't there a shutdown/sleep option under the user menu at the top-right of the start screen?

    – Why isn't there a date+clock on the start screen? I know you can open the charms menu to see it, but its nice to be able to glance over at the computer and see it without interaction.

    – As I am typing this with the metro browser, there is a bit of a lag between me pressing the keys and them showing up in the textbox. I can outrun the pace at which the text is drawn on the screen.

    ==

    Don't think that I am unhappy with Windows 8, just because of all of the negative feedback I found. I am delighted with Windows 8 and look forward to making it my primary OS when it comes out. Keep up the good work!

  31. Keep the promise: allow the option to change to normal desktop format, and allow changes if you need it on the go, i'am an engineer i wont be touching screens aften else i wont even see the screen after. mertro style is not for every one, websites are deferent for a particular audiance cnn.com or bmw.com will have defferent UI, for that market or user group, person computer devices should have a standard interface (or customised by user) like normal desktop. all computer devices (desktop, laptop, palmtop (table and phone) should have standard UI rative to the brand, device and use not foreced into a specific style or design out millions or billions UI ideas that it could be, ALLOW USERS TO CHOOSE WHAT UI THEY WANT AND CUSTOMISE TO ANY UI POSSIBLE IN ANY FORMAT ON YOUR ENGINE.

  32. samhunt says:

    will there be a way to access the charms by moving the cursor to the left side of the screen? that would be excellent. It would be great if all the hidden Metro controls could be accessed that way.

    will we be able to replicate the touch controls on a laptop touchpad? Optional gestures would be such a great plus! perhaps we could do two-finger swipes to move left and right on the Metro app screen! It would be cool if we had gestures to bring in the charms/ immersive app controls too!

  33. jj says:

    No compromises? maybe there should have been!

  34. Duke says:

    I hope you all make both metro and desktop "skins" for all of your apps. I want to be able to use the desktop version if I am using a large monitor and can display multiple windows at a time, while the metro is better for casual use on my notebook monitor. Also I think it would be cool if you give developers a way to include both metro and windowed versions of their apps in a similar fashion, and let the user choose which version they launch.

  35. Jhabril Harris says:

    Seven Sinofsky, how do you bring up the tabs and other things in metro styled IE10 with mouse and keyboard?

  36. I just had a thought that maybe the reason browser plugins don't appear to work is because the Metro browser is 64bit while the desktop browser is 32bit (maybe). When I tested, I installed 32bit Silverlight and Flash plugins — they didn't work in Metro browser. Has anyone tried 64bit Flash? I think Silverlight is 32bit only. I can't try it until the morning.

  37. Test.Result says:

    Can anyone confirm the score of Acid3 on ie10pp3? http://acid3.acidtests.org

  38. @Jhabril Harris. You right click, or use window key +z which is the universal shortcut to the appbar.

    Also as i showed yesterday, all your favorite keyboard shortcuts work..ctrl+t ctrl+k ctrl+e ctrl+l alt+d and so on

  39. Chris McGrath says:

    On the topic of IE. One thing I HATE about IE9 (I think IE7&8 were the same) is that when you middle click to close a tab it it closes on Mouse Down. This is just terrible it's surprising annoying to see it disappear before you do a proper click.

  40. Dennis says:

    How come all the processes are labled iexplorer.exe, I accidentally thought I was killing rouge versions of ie running, only to find I took down the interface.  Two questions, if parts of the interface are using IE rendering engine (ala IE4/Win95 antitrust) shouldn't they be named the process in which parts of the interface like controlpanel.exe or taskbar.exe or desktop.exe?  I think this is foolish if you don't do something about this, otherwise another scandal will arise from the general public discovering this too

  41. @Steven Sinofsky: Great work on all of this.  There are going to be a few users (the ones complaining here) that the Metro UI is not something they like, but I think we'll see that most users love it.

    What regular users seem to miss is that Windows Metro apps are "designed" to look flat compared to other users.   That's the whole point.   Commercial apps can use live tiles, animations, backgrounds, and several lines of text, and even on the phone, they can look very "pretty".

    And for the guy that thought the weather app was poking fun at something by showing a sandy beach; did you ever think that (just like Bing maps does today) the app, which could have GPS and/or IP geolocation, is using that to pick out a picture that is specifically targeted to the location that the user is operating in, or the city they are asking about?   That's nothing to get perturbed about, certainly.

    BTW, I'm still trying any angles I can to get in "touch" with one of those Samsung tablets.   There are just a few kinks in it, but I think the design is so good that Samsung could sell a boatload of them, at least to Windows 8 developers, and what a way to catapult Metro Style apps!

    Most developers are probably not averse to paying for the thing, if they can get a reasonable price.

    Seriously think about it.

    -thanks

    -e

  42. I don't care what users say. let people for mouse and keybored choose if they want metro. I don't care if i have to scroll i love the idea of metro. If people are having a problem let them choose between the old start menu and the new and improve start screen. I'm crossing my fingers for the start screen on mouse and key bored. I scroll all the time, i don't get what the problem is.

  43. n/a says:

    Is there an explanation why all word out of development constantly repeats the exact phrase "no compromise"? It's not common enough to be natural or appear so frequently (unless everyone talking publicly has caught the same meme), but I'm wondering if the marketing machine is already gearing up to pretend that the public has somehow been compromising.

  44. sreesiv says:

    "One browser, split personalities, no compromises…" would have been a better sentence to summarise it.

  45. Tim Ehlers says:

    Please remove the zones-model from IE. It is much too complicated for most users. And esp. the zone for non-trusted sited doesn't make sense: Every unknown site (Internet-Zone) must be seen as insecure. No other browser has this zones-model and they're secure too.

  46. @Chris McGrath says:

    Did you report it on connect.microsoft.com/ie ? Can you pass me the bug id so I can vote up ?

  47. "There is work ahead with site developers to take full advantage of it."

    Hands up who else finds this phrase extremely disturbing, since even Microsoft is now trying to throw the horrible shackles of IE6 off the web?

  48. Why you should change the metro UI style

    As an mechanical engineer i wont be using my fingers rather a pen or mouse on tablets or phone. The interface can generally be in any visual format (metro style included), if your products force people to change when they don’t want to change this will affect market share and you might loose, allow people to choose what kind of interface they want to use not force a particular visual style on them allow default windows desktop format enlarged to accommodate touch.

    Website interfaces are different relative to the audience or user group, windows OS should have non specific style for a general purpose, this style is not appealing for business, government, academic, student, home users its more appealing to a niche design group, a style that will go out fashion like clothing or any other design. This UI hides the desktop, rather than find software programs or application icon within the desktop, laptop or palmtop (tablet or phone). It should have a main board or platform on its interface where you find all installed software programs/applications not pin social media as core, in business only PR and marketing will use this, how about accounting, operations, Research, Human resource etc, how about government units, how about academic units the user that use this.

    Recommendations: if you like so much allow users to choose between metro UI and other millions of UI ideas that can be formed (designed by third parties including other that come with the OS). Or simply enlarge normal windows UI to allow touch (this ui only works for touch not pen or mouse) for all computer devices (desktop, laptop, palmtop (tablet or phone) with a consistent normal window UI enlarged with a main board/platform with software programs/application icons on it. Allow open use as windows has always been, allow user to reconfigure it in any they like, add external devices (printer, etc drivers coming from a download etc) easily with all the devices like always.

  49. I hope you intend to provide access to favorites in the metro browser. I don't want to fill up my start screen with websites.

  50. Den says:

    Dude,  who cares about HTML when there is XAML?

  51. Jason says:

    It's very exciting to have hands on the up-and-coming. I'm lacking a touch screen so I can only really comment on the mouse/keyboard scenarios.

    I imagine myself carrying around a windows slate. I arrive at work, plug into a dock and switch to the desktop to do productive work. Not much changes here for me since I'll be in the same familiar win7 interface I'm used to. All my favorite programs are pinned to the taskbar so I'm not really affected by any "jarring" (as some users put it) of a new start experience (which I think is pretty cool and just as functional as the old start menu).

    However, once I'm done with work and I undock and head to the bus, things change. Sinofsky said "if you never leave the metro environment, we don't load the desktop files." Well they're loaded now, and I'm noticing that the desktop apps don't seem to get suspended when out of focus. So does that mean I miss out on the power saving features of Win8? Since the desktop is "just an app," can't it be suspended too?

    I also share concerns about not being able to close metro apps. They seem to have closed themselves in some instances, but they really do clutter up the switcher UI. Escape key maybe? Alt+F4 should at least work… Also – while it's true they don't use CPU, they ARE using memory. Hopefully when I crank up a memory intensive program they get shutdown for me otherwise that new task manager is about to get a lot more use…

    But this is a post about the browser – "one engine, 2 UIs". I guess this means 2 processes. I was sad to see that if I had a news posting open in a browser while doing desktop work, that when I go to slate mode, those open tabs wouldn't be accessible from the metro interface. Which means when I get on the bus, I'm going to be using clumsy fingers in the desktop environment to continue reading. I, like Jeremy above, really expected to see that a tab open in one UI would be open in the other – one program running in memory, accessible from either interface. THAT would have been cool.

    I'd like access to my extensive bookmark collection from inside the metro UI.

    One final thought about the browser: If Sinofsky hadn't mentioned the right click to bring up the UI, I would have never found it. When I launched metro-IE, it felt like full-screen mode of desktop-IE. I expected tabs to show up when I moused to the top of the screen and an address bar when I moused to the bottom. When that didn't happen on hover, I started clicking… I think onHover should work like right-click: Windows 7 was all about reducing clicks and has all sorts of hover behavior on the taskbar. It's not unreasonable to have action bars show up when you hover at the top/bottom of the screen.

    Thanks!

  52. Not Impressed by HTML5 says:

    @Den, I wish I saw more comments praising XAML instead of HTML5. I HATE the idea of writing HTML5 apps (for business systems) instead of ones based upon WFP. In that domain, HTML5 is the wrong choice (and unfortunately in my work, I don't get to choose the platform and there is a title wave of interest in HTML5 right now!)

  53. Jason says:

    @Jeremy I just found a way to clear metro apps. Go to control panel, click privacy. You can select the number of apps that stay in the app-switcher and "delete history" will close them all.

  54. Michal Volf says:

    @Steven Sinofsky In this blog post it's written: "If you want to stay permanently immersed in that Metro world, you can. You won’t even see the desktop, and Windows will not load the code unless you explicitly choose to launch it."

    Is this true only for Metro or classic desktop as well? If I choose classic desktop, I won't see Metro and it won't be loaded? I'm asking because in the Developer version it doesn't seem this way (I know it's Developer version….). Thanks…

  55. The computer (PC) should swallow the phone.

    PC is a computational devices like a phone or tablet, Microsoft dominates PC (desktop) which can transform (allows a socket for a SIM card to be a phone, allow its screen to be feel touch to be a tablet, unplug its self from the wall and make its self smaller to fit your Desk (desktop), Your Lap (laptop) or Palm (phone or tablet))to any format running  the same engine. This is the route Microsoft should take instead off calling it a phone call it a mini PC (or palmtop) in its marketing campaigns and functioning.

    You should not allow a distinction between the same computational devices (non mobile or mobile) this confuses consumers and producers present a clear path forward just computational devices in deferent physical formats for particular purpose and function running the same engine and not allowing deferent UI across the devices keep the traditional Microsoft UI feel to remind users this is a computer device in your all your marketing campaigns.

    To achieve this remove the metro UI or allow users to choose between normal icon view on a platform (desktop).

    As an mechanical engineer i wont be using my fingers rather a pen or mouse on tablets or phone. The interface can generally be in any visual format (metro style included), if your products force people to change when they don’t want to change this will affect market share and you might loose, allow people to choose what kind of interface they want to use not force a particular visual style on them allow default windows desktop format enlarged to accommodate touch.

    Website interfaces are different relative to the audience or user group, windows OS should have non specific style for a general purpose, this style is not appealing for business, government, academic, student, home users its more appealing to a niche design group, a style that will go out fashion like clothing or any other design. This UI hides the desktop, rather than find software programs or application icon within the desktop, laptop or palmtop (tablet or phone). It should have a main board or platform on its interface where you find all installed software programs/applications not pin social media as core, in business only PR and marketing will use this, how about accounting, operations, Research, Human resource etc, how about government units, how about academic units the user that use this.

    Recommendations: if you like it so much allow users to choose between metro UI and other millions of UI ideas or concepts that can be formed (designed by third parties including other that come with the OS). Or simply enlarge normal windows UI to allow touch (this ui only works for touch not pen or mouse unless you want waste space) for all computer devices (desktop, laptop, palmtop (tablet or phone) with a consistent normal window UI enlarged with a main board/platform with software programs/application icons on it. Allow open use as windows has always been, allow user to reconfigure it in any they like, add external devices (printer, etc drivers coming from a download etc) easily with all the devices like always.

    A quote from steve jobs “users that are familiar with something that, you know, they don’t want a car with six wheels. They like the car with four wheels. They don’t want to drive with a joystick. They like the steering wheel.” allthingsd.com/…/d5-gates-jobs-transcript

    My predictions: The Computer is going to or should swallow the phone, why because it’s a computational device that allow a socket for a SIM card to be a phone, allow its screen to be feel touch to be a tablet, unplug its self from the wall and make its self smaller to fit your Desk (desktop), Your Lap (laptop) or Palm (phone or tablet)

  56. Jhabril Harris says:

    @Steven Sinofsky Thank you very much, now I'm enjoying a better metro styled experience. 🙂 Although, could you/someone else post a post/page on a list of shortcuts for metro styled Windows? Thank you.

  57. In Windows 7 the greatest part of the Start menu was the ability to hit Start and begin typing the program I want to load.  I type V-i-s-u-a and before I know it Visual Studio 2010 is there and I just hit enter and its up and running.

    Fortunately, this still works in Windows 8, however the workflow now contains two very jarring transitions: one when I'm transititioned into the Start screen, and another when I hit enter to run the classic Windows application (like Visual Studio or Notepad).  While the Metro UI is very minimalistic (and stylish!), the transitions of running classic Desktop applications isn't very smooth.  I lose focus with what I'm doing when all my classic Desktop applications are replaced with Metro tiles, only to be suddenly pulled back into the classic Desktop.  I want these two transitions to go away.  In Windows 7, this procedure doesn't require any large graphical transitions, which means your eyes don't lose focus on what you're doing.  I keep wondering "Why do I need to go this fancy screen when its only going to bring me back to where I was at the Desktop?".

    One partial workaround is to type Start+R within the Desktop, but that only works for applications like Notepad and Calculator (which I use a lot) where the .exe is in the path and is easily knowable.

    A more "Metro" suggestion:

    1. I'm at the Desktop

    2. I click the Start button on my keyboard

    3. the charms show up above the Start button, additionally the "Search Apps" bar appears on the right side of the screen.  However I'm still in the Desktop.

    4. I type the application I'm looking for (e.g. "V-i-s-u-a" as mentioned above)

    5. As I'm typing the application name, results are being displayed in the "Search Apps" bar which I can select via keyboard or mouse.

    5. I hit enter and and the application starts in the Desktop (without any transitions to the Metro tiles), the Charms and the "Search Apps" bar goes away.

    6. If I want to back to the Metro tiles, I would hit the Start button while the Charms are being displayed above the Start button (effectively double clicking the Start button).

    Another way would be to just bring back the classic Start menu, but allow another way to transition back to the Metro Start Screen.  This would surely lure more unsure Windows 7 fans over with a more familiar UI.  Don't mistake me, I've been using Windows 8 and I love the new Metro Start Screen… it seems very touch-friendly, attractive, and easy-to-use.  I *don't* want a solution which removes/disables the new Start screen.  I'm just concerned about the noisy workflow right now for those of us who will primarily be using the Desktop and Desktop applications.

  58. Alom the man says:

    In the start screen. mouse drag and scroll should be allowed. One should be able to click and hold the mouse to scroll. I think its a must have.

  59. ray says:

    windows 8 develop preview is slower than windows7

  60. Well one engine 2 experience and no compromises seems kind of hilarious considering you are limiting browsing without plugins in one of the experiences (aka Metro).

  61. i love that metro browser, but i want o add that it would be cool if you could implent a home button in the metro browser as well. also i use this only with keyboard and mouse and when i search in bing for e.g. i often open more pages in a new tab with the mouse wheel. this is posiible, i know, but the site which i selected opens, so must go back to the tab, where bing is opened and select another site. back and forward, thats not fast and fluid, wehn i want to open more sites first and than read them.

    best regards and i know that this is an early build 😉

  62. Metro Apps for Enterprise!!!! says:

    Very much needed MS comments!!! Is it true that you can not deploy WinRT without a subscription developer without Market?? http://yfrog.com/hw103p I very much needed service deployment of my applications to bypass the store (for my company and my partners)!!! #panic

  63. @Metro Apps for Enterprise!!!! We have only done a demo of the store and said more details to follow.

  64. Cristi-M says:

    Sorry… Metro UI looks like an intersting ideea for tablets or touchscreen pc, but is far, very far to be an solution. It will take to much time to make it usable and refined enough to be an viable solution.

    Navigation is such a pain… I have try for an hour how to close IE 10 and found no way…

    Dificult to believe it will be ready for Windows 8…

    And for an Desktop ? No way…

  65. The Metro style browser does not handle pop ups well. Everything is full screen so a popup takes up the entire screen leaving the user to manually toggle the tabs view to see what's going on. It would be nice if the tabs view automatically appeared when a site launches a popup

    On that note, I hope you all include better mouse support for Metro style IE (and other Metro apps) such as displaying the tab and address bar when the user moves the mouse to the top (or bottom) of the window. Or even allowing the user to make the tab and address bar permanently visible…

    I know, I know, Windows 8 seeks to remove clutter, but hey, just introduce the "dot dot dot" (more options) button like Windows Phone, toss a More options button in the context sensitive Settings controls–something.

  66. Roland S. says:

    ShellExecuting an URL (http://) always opens the Metro IE in the developer build, even from Win32 apps. When using the jump list from the desktop IE to open a recently used page, the page opens in the Metro IE and not in the desktop IE as expected.

    This is very confusing and limiting. From the desktop, ShellExecute on URLs should always launch the desktop browser, not Metro IE.

  67. QAMAR ZAMAN PAMEC says:

    One caveat though, with Parallels, the default Administrator account created by Parallels is no use and has lot of security issues. To around it, I have created another user with Administrative privileges and voila! everything works. I have even converted my ID into live ID to take advantage of the cloud syncing features (Have loaded Windows 8 on a 32 bit PC as well and saw the settings sync)

  68. QAMAR ZAMAN PAMEC says:

    One caveat though, with Parallels, the default Administrator account created by Parallels is no use and has lot of security issues. To around it, I have created another user with Administrative privileges and voila! everything works. I have even converted my ID into live ID to take advantage of the cloud syncing features (Have loaded Windows 8 on a 32 bit PC as well and saw the settings sync)

  69. Paul says:

    If the user interface and interaction paradigms are SO different as "Metro" vs desktop then it is best to always keep them separate and never mix the two.

    Unfortunately, Microsoft has got this SO wrong here – trying to kludge together two entirely different user interfaces simply just doesn't work!

    As much as I hated all the different versions of windows I think "Metro" should only be in "Windows 8 Tablet Edition". Only when there is a TRUE single UI paradigm should the two be brought together. I suggest that this could be done by working from the classic desktop UI and making a morphing UI when tough input is detected – this would keep the same UI controls as the desktop UI, but simply morph with an animation into more touch-friendly controls.

  70. JOE says:

    Why isn't there an easier way to switch between running aps in the metro screen ????????????????????????

    If you have 20 + running aps, it would be tedious to swipe from the left 20 + times

  71. Finally I have to remove Metro UI and use standard desktop. It's a pain to use it. You should at least put an visible CLOSE button in the Metro Aplications. As in IE 10 Metro there is a button for closing "tabs" why not puttying an close button for the entire Application.

  72. Shal says:

    Metro can be good on phones and tablets, but it is not the best idea for large monitors.

  73. Smith says:

    Please use the classic desktop theme in meters as well

  74. Brendan says:

    Can someone please help.  I can't seem to zoom out in the start menu using keyboard/mouse combinations.  This means I can't label "Start Menu" groups.

    Massive oversight, IMO.  These things should be documented somewhere…

  75. MohanV says:

    Hello, please, please, please have one button to get back to Win7 start menu interface.  Corporations will be annoyed if you just don't have that, don't get sucked into all the positive comments here, your bread and butter comes from Enterprise deployment from Win8, from what I see here this will never be an iPad killer but you got an opportunity if you really promise "no compromise" win7 experience.

  76. THE DESKTOP

    I think the desktop must continue to be the main space in a PC, like a "welcome home", but improved in many ways.

    To make it clear, in first place, please take a look at this image:

    http://www.moquo.com.ar/…/w7.jpg

    You’ll see here and empty an almost not functional default desktop. In this image you can access only the recycle bin. The whole thing in desktop can be improved by giving it “life” to it.

    No-one likes a desktop full of icons (like this one: http://www.moquo.com.ar/…/desktopfull.gif), messed up, or I’m wrong?

    Ok, what can be made to improve the desktop in a very interesting way?

    This image says it all: http://www.moquo.com.ar/…/desktop+metroapps.jpg

    I show you here that it can be possible to integrate Metro Apps right in the desktop without compromising desktop organization! And, the best thing is: there’s no need to press Start button to switch between apps and the desktop!

    If you take a look at this screenshot again: , you will see -apart from metro apps and the taskbar-, a bunch of icons and shortcuts, organized inside “Fences”. Fences is a 3rd party program that allows you to organize the desktop icons much better than the “organize” native function of Windows.

    This program/technology can be acquired for Microsoft for its implementation in the next version of Windows.

    So, with this screenshot, it’s proved that 4 elements can coexist well together: desktop + icons/shortcuts organization + apps + taskbar.

  77. METRO & AERO

    Both UI are really good. There’s no discussion about it. Metro is modern and minimal than Aero, that’s something that almost everyone knows.

    If you use a Windows Phone, you will see how simple and great can be Metro UI in front of your eyes and fingers. It’s just awesome.

    Aero haves something great and unique: Aero Glass. It does a great and innovative invent from Microsoft, and I’m glad to see it every day when I use my PC.

    But, till I’ve test W8P, I’ve release that something could be wrong, let me explain why.

    I use my laptop with an external monitor connected (it’s more comfortable for working), a Samsung monitor with a resolution of 1920 x 1080, with a matte screen.

    My first reaction with Metro screen was “wow”, I like the movements and transitions, and the excitement of having a new “toy” like the apps, but later, when I start using the whole OS, I release that is not very funny using it as is (at least).

    I feel the W8 Preview is very oriented to touch screen devices with medium & small screens with a glossy surface. In a bigger screen, Metro UI lacks style and bright; it looks flat and empty, and the full screen apps with a mouse don’t feel good at all. It have not sense viewing a weather app in full screen. It has no sense viewing a group of apps that fill the screen in a desktop PC. It’s only to play around the first time… but… what will be happen when you saw this start screen every day? In a desktop PC could be really annoying.

    All the bigger fonts used in Control Panel, Settings and more, as well as the whole Metro UI feels like a too simple and flat design for an HD monitor. Just imagine Metro UI in your 24” monitor, without touching it! Only with a mouse and keyboard… Don’t get me wrong, I love Metro UI but I think it’s more suitable for smaller devices with touch screens.

    By using a Desktop PC, just make yourself these questions:

    – It’s really necessary to go fullscreen, and switch between 2 stages to see the weather report app?

    – It’s really necessary to go fullscreen to open Control Panel?

    – What will happen when you use IE app, and try to watch some YouTube video, or Flash website, and you release that plug-ins don’t work on IE10 app?

    – How many “clicks” you’ll have to do for only view an app and do a fast action?

  78. Lance says:

    I'd really like to hear about improvements that have nothing to do with Metro (like the improved copying feature), since it's not that great for PC's and I don't care about tablets ATM and Metro is a bit unfriendly with a keyboard and mouse.

    If Metro is the main improvement, there's no reason for me to upgrade and that's the first time I ever thought that about a Microsoft product.

  79. Dave says:

    It is both pathetic and sad to see how hard Microsoft is trying to copy Apple.  Its even even more patheric to see how they keep failing after each and every try.  It is time that Microsoft leave the OS business to the pro's – they will NEVER be good enough to compete with Apple.

  80. xpclient says:

    Dear Steven and Dean,

    Initially I didn't like IE9 very much, but I've grown to like it slowly and it's now my primary browser. However, I do not agree with the approach Microsoft is taking with IE. It is taking away without any user choice options that have been in IE and people depend on for years. I agree some want a clean, clutter-free experience but others want power browsing with all the bells and whistles. Why not offer a balance by hiding/turning off features by default but giving *users* the choice to turn on the features they want? While IE9 was being developed, the feedback I posted on Connect which also received several up votes btw resulted in zero visible changes in the shipping version of IE9, so you have no idea what customers want from IE. I posted feedback very actively on the IE blog and on Connect during IE9 development but to no avail. There are many many users at Connect and at Microsoft's forums who are asking for features which Microsoft removed instead of hiding from IE9. Clearly, the design of IE9 is so heavily influenced by a select few at Microsoft who want a minimal chrome that they have zero consideration for users who prefer a more full featured UI with more buttons and indicators. The IE9  experience for me is full of compromises for me compared to IE8 and I expect something to be done in this regard for IE10. Btw I love what you have done previously with IE7 and IE8 and also love all the rendering engine and performance improvements in IE9. In fact, now that Metro style IE is also available, this might be a very good opportunity to restore some lost power to the desktop IE experience. I want these please re-considered for IE10:

    1.  Dedicated search box with OpenSearch provider discovery and sound notification. Allow me to explain the request for dedicated search box:

      * You don't discover new OpenSearch search providers any more with a sound or visual indication.

      * If you search with say search engine 1, to search with the same search terms using a different engine 2 after you have searched with one and navigated elsewhere, you have to copy paste the search terms in the address bar or type them again.

      * You only see icons now for search providers, no quick way to view their textual name, many search providers don't supply favicons and hovering over each search provider icon is time consuming and confusing with many providers showing the magnifying glass icon.

      *  You can't quickly switch between 2 search engines using the keyboard using the same search terms. e.g. Ctrl+E, then Down arrow key. I know Ctrl-E now takes focus to one box but selecting another search provider using keyboard isn't easy after that.

      *  You have to remember the keywords for searches. i.e. 'gi' for Google images, 'gm' for Google Maps which I don't want to.

      *  The terms from a search box on a web page do not sync with search terms in the one box (as it has to show the address there!)

      *  Whenever I search from the IE9 address bar with the search terms inside quotes, I get a blank page that says "Internet Explorer has modified this page to help prevent cross-site scripting." Doesn't happen when I don't use quotes.

      *  Searching from address bar was always available in IE right since IE6 even before IE7 added the search box. So please please add the search box back for IE10 will full IE8-like functionality

    2.  Tab list menu button (Ctrl+Shift+Q) – feature which IE7 and IE8 offered. A list style view of tabs is important. It was very useful and more importantly it took a very tiny amount of space in the browser chrome (just a very tiny dropdown arrow).

    3.  Fully functional status bar with page loading errors and Done message on status bar, a progress bar, Protected Mode status and zone information, cookie blocked icon and website privacy policy/report. Again, the status bar in Windows Explorer is being made more useful for the Windows 8 release

    4,  Notification bar should appear above the status bar if the status bar is enabled, it should not cover the status bar

    5.  Completed MB and progress bar for downloads, no % complete is not enough, MB completed is required

    6.  Download complete notification with only a sound instead of both a sound and a visual notification like IE8 offered

    7.  Prompt for location for each download like IE8 allowed. I do not want a default download location.

    8.  Local help files! Seriously WTH?

    9.  Option to turn off reputation-based downloading for power users without turning off SmartScreen

    10. Not disable BHOs and addons in Pinned Site mode in desktop IE10.

    11. Chakra engine in the 64-bit version

    12.  Fully customizable position of toolbars and address bar – feature with IE6 offered

    13.  Automatically restore previous session option – feature which IE7 offered

    14.  The ability to delete ActiveX controls (note, not just disable them but remove them). This is missing in IE8 and IE9 and is a serious concern

    15.  Ability to change pinned site shortcut icon – like a regular .URL shortcut allows

    Almost all of these are regressions/step back from previous versions of IE so I expect them to be handled with priority. The search box, status bar features and tab list are the absolutely most critically requested features on Connect yet IE9 did not add them back. If these features are added back, then it will be a truly no compromise experience and with Metro IE serving minimalists needs, desktop IE10 needs them.

  81. xpclient says:

    Note that in spite of so many removals, I stuck with IE because it has superior usability and performance but IE9 surely has made my browsing a lot more difficult so I expect these features to be restored. With Metro IE debuting in Windows 8, at least one version of IE should be powerful and offer more features.

  82. Matt says:

    Metro Dynamis let you develop the new Metro Style Applications very easily. Take a look at http://metrodynamis.com

  83. windows user says:

    Microsoft must provide the ability to build live tiles for legacy applications. And they need to improve the new metro desktop manager to manage multiple windows (either metro or classic apps). Anything else will be a big fail!!!

  84. abdo says:

    You don't discover new OpenSearch search providers any more with a sound or visual indication.

    full-windows8.blogspot.com

  85. abdo says:

    You don't discover new OpenSearch search providers any more with a sound or visual indication.

    full-windows8.blogspot.com

  86. I'm really enjoying both IE10 experiences and I'm gravitating towards using the Metro-style interface for most of my daily casual browsing. The thing that I think really needs to be added is syncing of history and favourites between the Metro and desktop version. Right now, there is no coherence between them at all and I have to keep remembering on which interface I viewed a particular site to try and access it again (as history isn't synced). I also have a feeling this would confuse many consumers, as at the moment the two UIs just look like completely separate browsers.  

  87. oliver says:

    Pleasey can we have a persistent tab bar are the top of the window? Mobile devices have shown us how annoying it is to have to touch twice just to switch tabs.  Likewise with basic controls such and back, forward and refresh

  88. Lewis Robinson says:

    Multilingual Web Addresses display in IE10, please (like Firefox, Opera)

    W3C Link: An Introduction to Multilingual Web Addresses – http://www.w3.org/…/idn-and-iri

  89. jps says:

    Real live experience:

    My wife just tried using my //Build Samsung tablet machine today and tried to go one of her regular sites (which uses Flash BTW) and it fails. She asked why doesn't Flash work on this computer? As a deverloper, I had to guide her to the desktop browser but my explanation was unsatifactory. She said "Why is there two browsers? I don't think I want to use this computer, it's too confusing."  

    This shows me that the Windows 8 experience is a complete failure as it is! I should NEVER have had to explain this to her. This has to work out of the box or people will flee Windows!!  Telling her there are two browsers, just use the other one is simply unacceptable!

  90. IE Freak says:

    good bye Internet Explorer Metro

    It is natural as a browser that Flash is renewable.

    The browser which cannot perform even a natural thing is unnecessary.

    Although new IE was expected very much, new IE will not use.

    It is too inconvenient that Flash and silverlight are unreproducible, and it is because it has not played the role of the browser.

    Both are important for Web experience.

    This is really regrettable although he liked the way of thinking itself called the browser of a touch panel very much.

    He cannot understand why can neither Flash nor silverright be seen and it is making.

    However, the developer of Microsoft made light of the user too much, and only the very selfish thing has been understood.

    Flash which silverright liked was convenient.

    I wanted to operate it by the touch panel of new IE.

    It is really regrettable although IE was used until now.

    Microsoft gets to know the company which made a fool of a user so far, and is very shocking.

    From now on, it cannot but become skeptical about Microsoft.

    the talk that Silverlight application is convertible for Metro application makes a fool of a user  I cannot consider.

    Probably, there is no flexibility too much.

    New Internet Explorer which was being looked forward to has gone to pieces.

    It is very shocking.

    good bye Microsoft

    The company which ignored the user cannot be followed.

  91. Boo says:

    Im a little confused because ths normal desktop and the metro style "apps" are going to be very disjointed with little to no itnegration

  92. Wait a minute! I've noticed the same problem here that I have on the "Designing for Metro style and the Desktop" post and on other posts on this blog. You said:

    "If you want to stay permanently immersed in that Metro world, you can. You won’t even see the desktop, and Windows will not load the code unless you explicitly choose to launch it. But if you do see value in the desktop experience – in precise control, in powerful windowing and file management, in compatibility with plug-ins – those capabilities are just a finger tap away. In the architecture and design, we've been very deliberate to provide a no-compromise experience for your needs, even if you carry only one device. So, browse where you’re comfortable."

    What about users who want to use ONLY the desktop web browser? Will they be forced to use the Metro-style IE10 as the default IE? For users on desktops, this is what tha quote should say:

    If you want to stay permanently immersed in the desktop world, you can. You won’t even see Metro, and Windows will not load the code unless you explicitly choose to launch it. But if you do see value in the Metro experience – in touch-first control, in Metro Snap and touch-obased navigation, in compatibility with Metro-only design – those capabilities are just a mouse click away. In the architecture and design, we've been very deliberate to provide a no-compromise experience for your needs, even if you carry only one device. So, browse where you’re comfortable.

    At this point, I see no benefit to desktop users of Metro-style IE10. It hides the UI away in an app bar where people won't want to click because the UI should already be present. Also, it breaks compatibility with tons of existing sites, and while YouTube may work properly with plugin-free IE by the time Windows 8 is launched, what about small websites that rely on Adobe Flash Player and that users will visit frequently? I'd hate to have to switch back and forth between browsers every time I click on a link from a Bing search. Thus, it makes more sense to just use the desktop version of IE all of the time. I would like to see the issues with Metro-style IE and all Metro-style apps (why bother with the app bar?) addressed in a future post.

  93. @xpclient

    With my book mode idea, you could get the best of both worlds – simplified UI but optional twin-pane view gives options like dedicated search bar, improved status/download/notification feedback, etc.

    social.msdn.microsoft.com/…/4f367181-33a7-402b-af9d-a2b5779f38f2

    The nice thing here is you can exploit all sorts of advanced features without adding a sidebar, so the Metro look and feel is not compromised.

  94. Richard says:

    Please explain "how to" disable the IE redirect from Outlook mails. Every time I click on a link in my mail "AUTO" defaults to the Metro IE app. Very frustrating! now have to read my news direct on ZDnews page for example.

    Is there a registry entry to "dis-able" this auto feature?

    thank you !! love Win 8, but this one issue….

    also the chat window in Facebook is a disaster to type messages… ?

    any ideas why?

    again thanks

  95. Taylor Hall says:

    I'd like to see IE's metro and desktop application talk — in fact, I think that any metro app running, should also show up in the taskbar when in desktop mode.  I really don't want to not be able to use the metro apps if I'm in desktop mode.

    If I open up a tab in IE in metro, and then switch to the desktop, it should be in my desktop version as well. — not two different programs, but two different skins of the same program.

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