Hello world! Welcome to AzureCAT Guidance!

Welcome to the AzureCAT Guidance blog! What is AzureCAT? CAT stands for “Customer Advisory Team.” We work with customers who act as feedback Advisors back to our product teams, by working on engagements with those customers and building ground-breaking solutions! We then have unique lessons we’ve learned from those solutions. And, thus, we publish them back…


Cloud SOLID Part I: Cloud Architecture and the Single Responsibility Principle

Authored by Casey Watson. Edited by RoAnn Corbisier. Reviewed by Rick Rainey and Kirk Evans. This article is also available as a Whitepaper PDF download on Azure.com: Whitepaper Download What is SOLID? First introduced in 2003 by Robert “Uncle Bob” Martin, SOLID principles are a set of prescriptive guidelines that, when followed, can help developers write code…


What Azure content would you like to see?

AzureCAT is a customer engagement team (“CAT” stands for Customer Advisory Team). And along the way, we want to share our insights and best practices with you! What Azure content would you like to see? First, please review our existing content on AzureCAT’s CATalogue page: http://aka.ms/theCATalogue Next, leave a comment with your answer! What Azure…


AzureCAT – Technical Customer Profiles

Last Updated: 12/08/17 Over in this blog post, we mentioned why we’re named AzureCAT: CAT stands for “Customer Advisory Team.” We work with customers who act as feedback Advisors back to our product teams, by working on engagements with those customers and building ground-breaking solutions!   While we help customers architect those solutions, we learn…


Using Azure Management APIs to Get Data About Your Deployed Resources

Authored by Abhisek Banerjee, Rangarajan Srirangam, Mandar Inamdar, and Rakesh Patil. Edited by Nanette Ray, Tycen Hopkins, and Mark Simms. Reviewed by Mark Simms, Manbeen Kohli, and Mike Wasson. This article is also available as a Whitepaper PDF download on Azure.com: Whitepaper Download Overview This article and the accompanying sample files show you how to collect…

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Using a custom Service Fabric configuration provider with ASP.NET Core

Authored by Mike Wasson (AzureCAT). Reviewed by Vaclav Turecek. Edited by Nanette Ray and RoAnn Corbisier. This sample shows how to expose Service Fabric configuration settings to ASP.NET Core, using the ASP.NET Core configuration API. You can find the sample files on GitHub at ServiceFabric-AspNetCore-Sample. ASP.NET Core uses configuration providers to load application settings at runtime. This sample implements a custom…

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AzureCAT Guidance – What Content Should We Refresh?

Earlier, we asked you what Azure content you’d like to see. And we’re digging into the opportunities around your excellent feedback. Now, we ask you… What AzureCAT content should we refresh? First, please review our existing content on AzureCAT’s CATalogue page: http://aka.ms/theCATalogue Specifically, please review our top content on the Azure Architecture Center: http://aka.ms/Architecture Next, leave a comment with…

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Choosing the right Kubernetes object for deploying workloads in Azure – Part 1

This material has been added to a full eBook, Kubernetes Objects on Microsoft Azure. Introduction This post covers getting started with local development using Kubernetes. It will cover configurations, tools, and common troubleshooting. For an overview of this blog series, use this introductory post. Getting started with Kubernetes In a typical development scenario, developers start…


Parallel File Systems for HPC Storage on Azure

Authored by Tony Wu (AzureCAT) and Tycen Hopkins. Edited by RoAnn Corbisier. Reviewed by Larry Brader, Xavier Pillons, Ed Price, Alan Stephenson, Elizabeth Kim, Dave Fellows, Dan Lepow, Neil Mackenzie, Karl Podesta, Mike Kiernan, Steve Roach, Karlheinz Pischke, and Shweta Gupta. Overview The high-performance I/O requirements and massive scalability needs of high performance computing (HPC)…

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Deploy a collectd agent in a Kubernetes cluster on Azure

Authored by Stas Kondratiev. Edited by Nanette Ray. Reviewed by Ben Hummerstone. To gather metrics about your Kubernetes cluster in Azure, you can collect telemetry from the nodes and store it in Graphite, InfluxDb, or another time-series database. This article describes how to use collectd, a popular daemon that collects system and application metrics and…

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